Volume 19 - Issue 6 - June 2006

Sports Medicine »

How To Recreate The Benefits Of Low Dye Strapping With Orthotics

By Scott A. Spencer, DPM | 11995 reads | 0 comments

How many of us have put on a low Dye strapping that successfully alleviated the patient’s symptoms only to prescribe foot orthotic devices that did not have the same outcome? I would think anyone who has been in practice long enough has done this. What happened between the low Dye strapping and the foot orthotic device that changed the outcome we anticipated?
One can use the low Dye as a treatment modality in and of itself or as a means of assessing whether or not a patient would benefit from a pair of foot orthotic devices. There are many variations of this strapping and many of us have s



News and Trends »

Study Examines Combination Of Procedures For Hallux Rigidus

By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor | 8406 reads | 0 comments

Can a combination of two procedures yield positive results for patients with hallux rigidus? A recent study, presented as an abstract at the annual meeting of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), notes increased function and decreased pain in patients who underwent a combination of a hemi-implant arthroplasty with a decompressional osteotomy.
As part of the study, 11 patients with hallux rigidus underwent the combination of surgical procedures. Patients had either grade III or IV hallux rigidus, less than 20 degrees of first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) dorsiflexion, an



Diabetes Watch »

A Guide To Understanding The Various Wound Classification Systems

By Kathleen Satterfield, DPM | 39351 reads | 0 comments
There are as many classification systems for wounds as there are clinicians who believe they have developed the proverbial “better mousetrap.” The various wound classification systems include the Wagner classification, the University of Texas scheme, the S(AD) SAD classification, the Red Yellow Black breakdown, which is prominent in the nursing literature, the PEDIS classification and the DEPA Score.

Practice Builders »

Essential Secrets To Marketing Your Practice Successfully

By Kevin McDonald, DPM | 15845 reads | 0 comments

When I was in podiatry school 20-something years ago, there was a podiatrist on the faculty who was very impressive to me. He wore stylish clothes, drove a Mercedes convertible and took vacations to Australia. One day, I asked him: “What does it take to have a successful career as a podiatrist?”
The doctor looked me square in the eye and said “Son, it only takes two things to be a successful podiatrist. One, you have to have a touch of gray hair so that you look experienced. Two, you need to have a couple of hemorrhoids so you look … concerned.”
I did not want to wait for the gray



Orthotics Q&A »

Exploring Orthotic Indications For Various Conditions

Guest Clinical Editor: James Losito, DPM | 17491 reads | 0 comments

In this edition of “Orthotics Q&A,” the panelists discuss various issues ranging from indications for the Richie Brace, Arizona AFO and prefabricated orthoses to whether orthotic casting should reduce supinatus. Without further delay, here is what the panelists had to say.

Q: What are the indications for using a Richie brace versus using an Arizona brace?
A:
For Doug Richie Jr., DPM, each custom ankle foot orthotic (AFO) has a different clinical indication and choosing one to treat a pathology is the same as choosing a surgical procedure. He notes the rigid Arizona AFO has a mol



Feature »

A Guide To Orthobiologics In Podiatric Surgery

Moderator: Mark Dollard, DPM; Panelists: Luis Leal, DPM, Kieran Mahan, DPM, D. Scot Malay, DPM, MSCE, Glenn Weinraub, DPM, and Thomas Zgonis, DPM | 14493 reads | 0 comments

In our ongoing quest to find viable graft alternatives in bone fracture and primary osseous repair, the technology of orthobiologic bone substitutes continues to evolve. Traditionally, we have looked for replacement bone from sources within the patient’s own body. Indeed, autograft is widely considered the gold standard for grafting. While autograft bone is superior in its ability to provide osteogenic mesenchymal stem cells, it does have a couple of inherent problems, namely, a limited supply and morbidity associated with harvesting from donor sites.
Accordingly, we have brought together a