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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
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  • June 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 6
    By Scott A. Spencer, DPM
    12,129 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    How many of us have put on a low Dye strapping that successfully alleviated the patient’s symptoms only to prescribe foot orthotic devices that did not have the same outcome? I would think anyone who has been in practice long enough has done this. What happened between the low Dye strapping and the foot orthotic device that changed the outcome we anticipated? One can use the low Dye as a treatment modality in and of itself or as a means of assessing whether or not a patient would benefit from a pair of foot orthotic devices. There are many variations of this strapping and many of us have s... continue reading
    Dr. Richie notes the Arizona AFO (shown above) is indicated for severe end-stage posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD), Charcot arthropathy and severe degenerative joint disease (DJD) of the ankle.
    Guest Clinical Editor: James Losito, DPM
    17,902 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    In this edition of “Orthotics Q&A,” the panelists discuss various issues ranging from indications for the Richie Brace, Arizona AFO and prefabricated orthoses to whether orthotic casting should reduce supinatus. Without further delay, here is what the panelists had to say. Q: What are the indications for using a Richie brace versus using an Arizona brace? A: For Doug Richie Jr., DPM, each custom ankle foot orthotic (AFO) has a different clinical indication and choosing one to treat a pathology is the same as choosing a surgical procedure. He notes the rigid Arizona AFO has a mol... continue reading
    Here one can see the impregnating of platelet gel concentrate (PGC) into an allogenic OATS plug. Dr. Weinraub says impregnating allogenic bone graft material with the PGC enhances local inductivity.
    Moderator: Mark Dollard, DPM; Panelists: Luis Leal, DPM, Kieran Mahan, DPM, D. Scot Malay, DPM, MSCE, Glenn Weinraub, DPM, and Thomas Zgonis, DPM
    14,728 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    In our ongoing quest to find viable graft alternatives in bone fracture and primary osseous repair, the technology of orthobiologic bone substitutes continues to evolve. Traditionally, we have looked for replacement bone from sources within the patient’s own body. Indeed, autograft is widely considered the gold standard for grafting. While autograft bone is superior in its ability to provide osteogenic mesenchymal stem cells, it does have a couple of inherent problems, namely, a limited supply and morbidity associated with harvesting from donor sites. Accordingly, we have brought together a... continue reading
    Here one can see a severely pronated foot after the patient underwent reconstructive surgery. While an orthotic device may be helpful in providing support for the foot, one must ensure the device has a wide midsole, adequate depth and heel counter support
    By David Levine, DPM, CPed
    16,628 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Everyone pronates and everyone supinates. It is a matter of how much and when each occurs that determines whether lower extremity problems will occur. Shoe companies have marketed their products based on the words “pronation” and “supination.” They have done such a good job at this that people come into our offices thinking they are either pronators or supinators. As we know, high arched feet can pronate too much just as low arched feet may not pronate enough. Now more than ever before, there is more awareness of orthotic devices as a result of foot-related products becoming availabl... continue reading
    By Leon Reber, DPM, and Babak Baravarian, DPM
    32,174 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Yes. After discussing the importance of the plantar plate in facilitating MTPJ stability, this author points out key shortcomings of the flexor tendon transfer and emphasizes the more direct focus of plantar plate repair. By Leon Reber, DPM When it comes to pain below the metatarsal head, clinicians have described this with various names such as predislocation syndrome, monoarticular nontraumatic synovitis, capsulitis or simply metatarsalgia. Although the terminology varies, the one thing they have in common is pressure. Excessive pressure below the metatarsal head is the reason... continue reading