Volume 19 - Issue 6 - June 2006

Technology In Practice »

Can Topical Cryotherapy Provide A Viable Alternative For Pain Relief?

By Anthony Leone, Special Projects Editor | 5033 reads | 0 comments

People who cannot take traditional pain medication for heel pain, sore arches or other podiatric problems may find comfort with Biofreeze (Performance Health, Inc.). The topical modality is designed to help relieve pain from sprains and sore muscles, among other aliments, according to the company.
Biofreeze is a topical cryotherapy analgesic that generates a cooling remedy that numbs painful areas and helps reduce inflammation, according to the manufacturer. The modality incorporates Ilex, a natural extract of holly, which is formulated in a base for topical application, according to Debra A



New Products »

Healing Wounds From The Onset

4535 reads | 0 comments

The latest in the universe of wound care products aims to treat a variety of ulcers and wounds.

Optase is indicated for healing dehiscent wounds as well as pressure, venous and arterial ulcers, according to the product’s manufacturer Onset Therapeutics. The company says the gel product is a capillary bed stimulant that both promotes healing and protects the wound bed area by acting as an occlusive barrier.
Optase is composed of balsam of Peru, castor oil and trypsin–BCT. The company says Optase decreases wound bed disruption during application and patients do not need a



Forum »

Did You Hear The One About The Bigoted Patient?

By John H. McCord, DPM | 2399 reads | 0 comments

The current paranoid hysteria of our country toward protecting our borders from illegal aliens, mainly those of color, has caused the revisit of an abscess on our national soul. Racial and ethnic slurs and jokes are back.
Following the civil rights battles of the 1960s, it became unacceptable to offend racial minorities. We did not have strict laws against racial jokes like other more developed countries such as the Netherlands but insulting jokes or comments seemed to cease.
I have a strict rule in my office that racial jokes and ethnic slurs are forbidden. Employees who forget this rule ge



Editor's Perspective »

Wound Classification Systems: Are They Significantly Utilized In Practice?

By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor | 4650 reads | 0 comments

The variety of classification systems for lower extremity wounds is stunning. There is the popular Wagner Ulcer Classification System, the University of Texas (UT) Diabetic Wound Classification System, the National Pressure Ulcer System, the PEDIS classification from the International Working Group for the Diabetic Foot and diabetic foot infection guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) among other classification schemes.
In a guest column for our “Diabetes Watch” column (see page 20), Kathleen Satterfield, DPM, discusses some of these classification systems an



Sports Medicine »

How To Recreate The Benefits Of Low Dye Strapping With Orthotics

By Scott A. Spencer, DPM | 11287 reads | 0 comments

How many of us have put on a low Dye strapping that successfully alleviated the patient’s symptoms only to prescribe foot orthotic devices that did not have the same outcome? I would think anyone who has been in practice long enough has done this. What happened between the low Dye strapping and the foot orthotic device that changed the outcome we anticipated?
One can use the low Dye as a treatment modality in and of itself or as a means of assessing whether or not a patient would benefit from a pair of foot orthotic devices. There are many variations of this strapping and many of us have s



News and Trends »

Study Examines Combination Of Procedures For Hallux Rigidus

By Brian McCurdy, Senior Editor | 7887 reads | 0 comments

Can a combination of two procedures yield positive results for patients with hallux rigidus? A recent study, presented as an abstract at the annual meeting of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), notes increased function and decreased pain in patients who underwent a combination of a hemi-implant arthroplasty with a decompressional osteotomy.
As part of the study, 11 patients with hallux rigidus underwent the combination of surgical procedures. Patients had either grade III or IV hallux rigidus, less than 20 degrees of first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) dorsiflexion, an



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