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  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • May 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 6
    Accordingly, one can appreciate the drawn medial line on the great toe to be inferior to the metatarsal line.
    By William Fishco, DPM
    68,697 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
    Arthrodesis of the great toe joint has been described for the repair of just about every problem affecting the great toe joint, including hallux valgus, hallux varus, hallux limitus/rigidus, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and salvage of failed surgeries of the first ray. Many foot surgeons view the great toe joint fusion as a salvage procedure and will not consider it for primary repair of hallux valgus or hallux rigidus. One of the reasons for doing any type of fusion surgery is to stabilize an unstable or hypermobile joint. With that said, the great toe joint fusion can be benefi... continue reading
    Here one can see a preoperative view of a pediatric flatfoot deformity.
    By Lawrence DiDomenico, DPM
    23,200 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Podiatric surgeons commonly perform an extraarticular calcaneal osteotomy on hindfoot deformities of the foot and ankle.1 One would typically perform this powerful osteotomy in conjunction with other procedures. Complications with the percutaneous calcaneal displacement osteotomy are rare.2-4 This is in contrast to the customary lateral approach of a calcaneal osteotomy as the surgeon may see complications that include wound dehiscence, sural nerve damage, sural neuritis, delayed union, non-union, infection and invasion of the medial neurovascular structures.2-6... continue reading
    Here one can see an epithelioid sarcoma. Note the ill-defined area of cutaneous/subcutaneous induration with focal ulceration.
    By Bradley W. Bakotic, DPM, DO
    19,184 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The recognition and characterization of soft tissue tumors is central to the practice of podiatric medicine. In many instances, clinicians of the lower extremity serve as the frontline physicians when it comes to the identification of such tumors. Given the inverse relationship between the amount of time prior to diagnosis and patient survival rates, the role of podiatrists may be of paramount importance. Depending upon one’s depth of experience and comfort level, some clinicians might limit their role to clinical recognition and ordering preliminary imaging studies. Others may go a step... continue reading