Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • May 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 6
    By Brian Fullem, DPM
    39,457 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/06
    Plantar fasciitis is often inaccurately referred to as “heel spur syndrome.” Clinicians should no longer use this terminology. Most of the time, the presence or absence of a plantar calcaneal spur has no effect on symptoms or treatment. The term fasciitis may also be a misnomer. Lemont studied the pathology of 50 patients who underwent fascial release surgery.1 The findings did not show any evidence of inflammatory cells within the fascia. The common finding was degeneration of the tissue. The inflammation appears to be in the underlying intrinsic musculature so perhaps the corr ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    3,378 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/06
    You wouldn’t think it would take much persuading to convince patients with diabetes to regularly monitor their blood sugar or stay off of a recently treated foot wound given the potentially serious consequences of not doing so. Yet the statistics tell us a different story. In an intriguing, retrospective study published in the February 2005 edition of WOUNDS, researchers found that patient compliance was poor in 79 percent of patients with diabetes that eventually succumbed to amputation. Experts say there are things clinicians can do to identify obstacles to compliance. It starts ... continue reading
    By William Fishco, DPM
    73,327 reads | 1 comments | 05/03/06
    Arthrodesis of the great toe joint has been described for the repair of just about every problem affecting the great toe joint, including hallux valgus, hallux varus, hallux limitus/rigidus, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and salvage of failed surgeries of the first ray. Many foot surgeons view the great toe joint fusion as a salvage procedure and will not consider it for primary repair of hallux valgus or hallux rigidus. One of the reasons for doing any type of fusion surgery is to stabilize an unstable or hypermobile joint. With that said, the great toe joint fusion can be benefi ... continue reading