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    Jeff Hall
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    Bonnie Shannon
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • May 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 6

    4,953 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    For many patients, stability and cushioning are high on their list of footwear needs. A new shoe may fulfill those needs. The 992 is for the overpronating patient, according to the manufacturer New Balance. The company says the N-Durance® feature provides the cushioning, stability and durability that patients need. In addition, New Balance notes the Encap® provides additional support and cushioning through the polyurethane rim while the Abzorb® SBS absorbs shock at the heel and forefoot. The 992’s C-Cap® midsole is compression molded EVA,... continue reading
    The STA-Peg implant is an example of an impact-blocking device or direct impact implant. Without changing the subtalar joint axis, these implants limit anterior displacement of the lateral talar process.
    By Donald Green, DPM, Mitzi Williams, DPM, and Chul Kim, PMS IV
    63,687 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
    “Collapsing” pes planovalgus or flexible flatfoot is a complex pedal pathological condition with numerous components. In its most significant form, the condition can lead to significant disabling and an inability to ambulate efficiently. Arthroereisis is a relatively modern surgical technique one may employ for pes planovalgus correction. Arthroereisis is defined as the limitation of exogenous joint motion without complete arthrodesis. This procedure, which involves placing a motion blocking implant within the sinus tarsi, has been designed to restrict excessive subtalar joint (STJ) pron... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    5,678 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I used to be humble about podiatry in the company of MDs and DOs. It seemed a necessary part of survival in the medical community. However, this humility has dissolved in recent years. When it comes to medical and surgical care of feet and ankles, we are the best at what we do. There is no need to kiss up to any non-podiatric physicians. I recently attended a medical staff and hospital board leadership conference. I have just finished a two-year term as Chief of Surgery and will assume the job of Board Chairman for our hospital next year. The conference was attended by physicians and leaders ... continue reading