Volume 19 - Issue 6 - May 2006

Continuing Education »

Soft Tissue Masses: When To Treat, When To Refer

By Bradley W. Bakotic, DPM, DO | 18528 reads | 0 comments

The recognition and characterization of soft tissue tumors is central to the practice of podiatric medicine. In many instances, clinicians of the lower extremity serve as the frontline physicians when it comes to the identification of such tumors. Given the inverse relationship between the amount of time prior to diagnosis and patient survival rates, the role of podiatrists may be of paramount importance.
Depending upon one’s depth of experience and comfort level, some clinicians might limit their role to clinical recognition and ordering preliminary imaging studies. Others may go a step



Treatment Dilemmas »

Why The Lapidus Procedure Is Ideal For Bunions

By Babak Baravarian, DPM | 33401 reads | 0 comments

With over 50 different surgical procedures in the literature relating to bunion surgery, there is a great deal of debate as to the best surgical procedure. Some consider a minimum incision technique to be ideal while others believe an open and more extensive correction is the best.
For years, I have pondered the best surgical procedure for hallux valgus correction and have tried many of the procedures. I have come to some conclusions that have dramatically changed my practice and resulted in far better outcomes related to hallux valgus correction.
First and foremost, I have to state that th



Technology In Practice »

Is Microdebridement A Viable Option For Treating Tendinosis?

By Anthony Leone, Special Project Editor | 8217 reads | 0 comments

Many people suffer from tendinosis or similar tendon aliments that involve tissue scarring. In seeking relief for their pain and discomfort, patients may try a variety of conservative modalities ranging from bracing to injections. If conservative methods fail, there is another option before one considers the possibility of an invasive surgical procedure.
The Topaz Microdebrider (Arthrocare) enables clinicians to perform microdebridement of soft tissue, such as tendons, in the foot and ankle. Essentially, the device uses radiofrequency energy to cause microscopic “trauma” to the scar tissu



New Products »

Balancing Patient Needs

4829 reads | 0 comments

For many patients, stability and cushioning are high on their list of footwear needs.

A new shoe may fulfill those needs. The 992 is for the overpronating patient, according to the manufacturer New Balance. The company says the N-Durance® feature provides the cushioning, stability and durability that patients need.
In addition, New Balance notes the Encap® provides additional support and cushioning through the polyurethane rim while the Abzorb® SBS absorbs shock at the heel and forefoot. The 992’s C-Cap® midsole is compression molded EVA,



Forum »

When A 'Foot Doctor' Teaches A Lesson In Humility

By John H. McCord, DPM | 5328 reads | 0 comments

I used to be humble about podiatry in the company of MDs and DOs. It seemed a necessary part of survival in the medical community. However, this humility has dissolved in recent years. When it comes to medical and surgical care of feet and ankles, we are the best at what we do. There is no need to kiss up to any non-podiatric physicians.
I recently attended a medical staff and hospital board leadership conference. I have just finished a two-year term as Chief of Surgery and will assume the job of Board Chairman for our hospital next year. The conference was attended by physicians and leaders



Editor's Perspective »

Facilitating Improved Compliance Among Patients With Diabetes

By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor | 3151 reads | 0 comments

You wouldn’t think it would take much persuading to convince patients with diabetes to regularly monitor their blood sugar or stay off of a recently treated foot wound given the potentially serious consequences of not doing so. Yet the statistics tell us a different story. In an intriguing, retrospective study published in the February 2005 edition of WOUNDS, researchers found that patient compliance was poor in 79 percent of patients with diabetes that eventually succumbed to amputation.
Experts say there are things clinicians can do to identify obstacles to compliance. It starts