Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • May 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 6
    The STA-Peg implant is an example of an impact-blocking device or direct impact implant. Without changing the subtalar joint axis, these implants limit anterior displacement of the lateral talar process.
    By Donald Green, DPM, Mitzi Williams, DPM, and Chul Kim, PMS IV
    63,552 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
    “Collapsing” pes planovalgus or flexible flatfoot is a complex pedal pathological condition with numerous components. In its most significant form, the condition can lead to significant disabling and an inability to ambulate efficiently. Arthroereisis is a relatively modern surgical technique one may employ for pes planovalgus correction. Arthroereisis is defined as the limitation of exogenous joint motion without complete arthrodesis. This procedure, which involves placing a motion blocking implant within the sinus tarsi, has been designed to restrict excessive subtalar joint (STJ) pron... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    5,655 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I used to be humble about podiatry in the company of MDs and DOs. It seemed a necessary part of survival in the medical community. However, this humility has dissolved in recent years. When it comes to medical and surgical care of feet and ankles, we are the best at what we do. There is no need to kiss up to any non-podiatric physicians. I recently attended a medical staff and hospital board leadership conference. I have just finished a two-year term as Chief of Surgery and will assume the job of Board Chairman for our hospital next year. The conference was attended by physicians and leaders ... continue reading
    Night splints are an additional adjunctive therapy that one should always consider in any treatment plan for plantar fasciitis.
    By Brian Fullem, DPM
    38,938 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Plantar fasciitis is often inaccurately referred to as “heel spur syndrome.” Clinicians should no longer use this terminology. Most of the time, the presence or absence of a plantar calcaneal spur has no effect on symptoms or treatment. The term fasciitis may also be a misnomer. Lemont studied the pathology of 50 patients who underwent fascial release surgery.1 The findings did not show any evidence of inflammatory cells within the fascia. The common finding was degeneration of the tissue. The inflammation appears to be in the underlying intrinsic musculature so perhaps the corr... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    3,291 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    You wouldn’t think it would take much persuading to convince patients with diabetes to regularly monitor their blood sugar or stay off of a recently treated foot wound given the potentially serious consequences of not doing so. Yet the statistics tell us a different story. In an intriguing, retrospective study published in the February 2005 edition of WOUNDS, researchers found that patient compliance was poor in 79 percent of patients with diabetes that eventually succumbed to amputation. Experts say there are things clinicians can do to identify obstacles to compliance. It starts ... continue reading
    Accordingly, one can appreciate the drawn medial line on the great toe to be inferior to the metatarsal line.
    By William Fishco, DPM
    68,674 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
    Arthrodesis of the great toe joint has been described for the repair of just about every problem affecting the great toe joint, including hallux valgus, hallux varus, hallux limitus/rigidus, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and salvage of failed surgeries of the first ray. Many foot surgeons view the great toe joint fusion as a salvage procedure and will not consider it for primary repair of hallux valgus or hallux rigidus. One of the reasons for doing any type of fusion surgery is to stabilize an unstable or hypermobile joint. With that said, the great toe joint fusion can be benefi... continue reading
    Here one can see a preoperative view of a pediatric flatfoot deformity.
    By Lawrence DiDomenico, DPM
    23,198 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Podiatric surgeons commonly perform an extraarticular calcaneal osteotomy on hindfoot deformities of the foot and ankle.1 One would typically perform this powerful osteotomy in conjunction with other procedures. Complications with the percutaneous calcaneal displacement osteotomy are rare.2-4 This is in contrast to the customary lateral approach of a calcaneal osteotomy as the surgeon may see complications that include wound dehiscence, sural nerve damage, sural neuritis, delayed union, non-union, infection and invasion of the medial neurovascular structures.2-6... continue reading
    Here one can see an epithelioid sarcoma. Note the ill-defined area of cutaneous/subcutaneous induration with focal ulceration.
    By Bradley W. Bakotic, DPM, DO
    19,182 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The recognition and characterization of soft tissue tumors is central to the practice of podiatric medicine. In many instances, clinicians of the lower extremity serve as the frontline physicians when it comes to the identification of such tumors. Given the inverse relationship between the amount of time prior to diagnosis and patient survival rates, the role of podiatrists may be of paramount importance. Depending upon one’s depth of experience and comfort level, some clinicians might limit their role to clinical recognition and ordering preliminary imaging studies. Others may go a step... continue reading
    Here one can see a postoperative wound dehiscence after a lateral ankle surgical procedure.
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    8,694 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Various classification systems categorize diabetic wounds and infections. One system, devised in 2003, categorizes different levels of non-vascular diabetic foot surgery. How effective is such a system? A recent study, the first to evaluate the system’s effectiveness, suggests including various risk factors in the system may better predict surgical complications. The study, presented as an abstract at the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting, evaluates the classification system’s four categories: elective, prophylactic, curative and emergency surgery. Res... continue reading
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    34,634 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    With over 50 different surgical procedures in the literature relating to bunion surgery, there is a great deal of debate as to the best surgical procedure. Some consider a minimum incision technique to be ideal while others believe an open and more extensive correction is the best. For years, I have pondered the best surgical procedure for hallux valgus correction and have tried many of the procedures. I have come to some conclusions that have dramatically changed my practice and resulted in far better outcomes related to hallux valgus correction. First and foremost, I have to state that th... continue reading
    Here one can see the application of Acticoat to cover a split thickness skin graft. One study found that Acticoat had a more rapid onset of action and better performance than three other
silver-containing dressings. (Photo Courtesy of Alan Cantor, DPM)
    By Chad Friedman, DPM, Elizabeth Bass, DPM, and John Steinberg, DPM
    11,482 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Given the increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, there is a growing interest in emerging wound care products that contain silver. Topical silver has a broad range of antimicrobial activity and has been used extensively to help treat high-risk burn patients. Research has confirmed that silver is effective against gram negative and positive bacteria, methicillin resistant Staph aureus (MRSA), yeast, filamentous fungi and viruses (including varicella zoster and herpes simplex types I and II).1-4 Interestingly, the use of silver for medicinal purposes has been docume... continue reading