Volume 19 - Issue 4 - April 2006

New Products »

Soothing Itchy Conditions

4893 reads | 0 comments

For patients with dermatological conditions, a new product may be able to provide some relief.

Ammonium Lactate Cream 12% is indicated for ichthyosis vulgaris and xerosis, according to the manufacturer, Paddock Laboratories. The product offers 12% lactic acid neutralized with ammonium hydroxide, according to the company.
As Paddock Labs says, when one applies lactic acid to the skin, it may decrease corneocyte cohesion. In addition, the company says an in vitro study showed that in cadaver skin, 6.1 percent of the Ammonium Lactate Cream was absorbed in 68 hours. It is available in a lot



Forum »

Confessions Of A Not So Avid Football Fan

By John H. McCord, DPM | 1661 reads | 0 comments

I have never been much of a fan of American football. This is partly due to a trauma related to the game early in my life. My father took me to a University of Montana Grizzly game when I was 5 years old. Naturally, we sat in the cheap seats, rickety bleachers used mostly by impoverished students and my father.
It was my first opportunity to watch a football game and I tried to concentrate but the tedium of timeouts, huddles and slow movement of huge men adorned in padding and helmets caused me to daydream. I dozed off, fell out of the bleachers and fractured my clavicle. I swore off football



Continuing Education »

Essential Insights On Treating Fifth Metatarsal Fractures

By Nicholas Romansky, DPM, and Todd Becker, DPM | 115839 reads | 0 comments

Podiatric physicians commonly see fifth metatarsal fractures when treating active patients. The actual rate of occurrence is unknown but some estimate the rate at somewhere between 0.7 and 1.9 percent of all foot fractures. Fractures of the fifth metatarsal can occur at a number of locations and while some of these respond well to conservative treatment, other fractures have been notoriously hard to heal with high rates of nonunion and other complications.
Proper classification of these fractures and a strong understanding of the mechanism of injury will help guide the podiatric physician