Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • April 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 4
    Applying foam underwrap in a single layer can protect sensitive skin and hair. It does retain moisture and heat.
    By Tim Dutra, DPM, MS
    79,365 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
    Taping is a critical art as well as a science when it comes to the treatment and prevention of athletic injuries. Taping takes practice, creativity and adaptability. It is a very important part of a sports medicine practice. Not only is taping therapeutic, it can also be diagnostic in the evaluation and treatment of injuries in athletes since the athlete’s response to taping can indicate the effectiveness of orthotics in controlling biomechanical issues. While taping is not a substitute for a comprehensive rehabilitation program, it is a key element in allowing an athlete to return to acti... continue reading
    Overbooking appointments and having staff act annoyed when patients ask how much longer the wait will be are two things that irritate patients, and may lead to them going elsewhere for podiatric care.
    By Michael Z. Metzger, DPM, MBA
    4,406 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Successful DPMs know the right formulas for keeping patients. One should manage medical information professionally, run an efficient office, listen to patient concerns and always keep the patient foremost in mind. On the flip side, if a podiatric practice engages in certain other behaviors, the podiatrist will likely see more than a few patients walk out the door without returning any time soon. That said, here are pearls on what not to do to keep a thriving practice. Unlike articles that suggest ideas to help you keep patients, I absolutely guarantee that the ideas presented in this article ... continue reading
    By Anthony Leone, Special Projects Editor
    5,837 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    When it comes to adjunctive modalities for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy, podiatrists may want to consider the supplement Metanx (Pamlab). Two podiatrists cite the modality as a safe and effective treatment option for those with diabetic neuropathy. Comprised of 2.8 mg of L-methylfolate, 25 mg of pyrioxal 5’-phosphate (B6) and 2 mg of methylcobalamin (B12), Metanx has been proven to increase nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and improve endothelial function, according to Allen Jacobs, DPM, and Theodore Varoz, DPM, PCPM, DFW. Dr. Jacobs notes that B6 facilitates neural regeneration and B12 ... continue reading
    The podiatry profession places too much emphasis on the subtalar and midtarsal joints, according to Christopher Nester, BSc, PhD. (Photo courtesy of Arnold Ross, DPM)
    Guest Clinical Editor: Bruce Williams, DPM
    8,243 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Although what one learned in podiatric medical school is invaluable in a podiatry career, sometimes podiatrists may encounter a different reality in clinical practice. These expert panelists weigh what they learned in school with their experience and the current research. They also detail which directions future orthotic research should take. Q: What is the current research telling us about how the foot really functions as opposed to what many podiatrists were taught in school? A: Much of the current research focuses on the importance of the midtarsal joint(s) and how they have a ... continue reading

    5,324 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    For patients with dermatological conditions, a new product may be able to provide some relief. Ammonium Lactate Cream 12% is indicated for ichthyosis vulgaris and xerosis, according to the manufacturer, Paddock Laboratories. The product offers 12% lactic acid neutralized with ammonium hydroxide, according to the company. As Paddock Labs says, when one applies lactic acid to the skin, it may decrease corneocyte cohesion. In addition, the company says an in vitro study showed that in cadaver skin, 6.1 percent of the Ammonium Lactate Cream was absorbed in 68 hours. It is available in a lot... continue reading