Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • April 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 4
    By Patrick A. DeHeer, DPM
    18,786 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/06
    When a foot and ankle specialist is involved as part of the medical staff for a college or professional basketball team, the demands on injury prevention and rehabilitation are significant. This high level of specialized care in the professional and collegiate setting involves several people, including the players, coaches, trainer, other medical staff and management in professional teams. Since treatment can involve the careers of those associated with the team, there is a certain amount of pressure on the treating physician. With so much at stake, two critical factors play an integral ro ... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    1,832 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/06
    I have never been much of a fan of American football. This is partly due to a trauma related to the game early in my life. My father took me to a University of Montana Grizzly game when I was 5 years old. Naturally, we sat in the cheap seats, rickety bleachers used mostly by impoverished students and my father. It was my first opportunity to watch a football game and I tried to concentrate but the tedium of timeouts, huddles and slow movement of huge men adorned in padding and helmets caused me to daydream. I dozed off, fell out of the bleachers and fractured my clavicle. I swore off football ... continue reading
    By Alan R. Catanzariti, DPM, Robert W. Mendicino, DPM, and Travis L. Sautter, DPM
    17,388 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/06
    Ankle fractures in patients with diabetes and documented neuropathy present a significant challenge to the clinician. The majority of literature has indicated that ankle fractures in this particular patient population are often difficult to manage and complication rates are reportedly quite high. These poor outcomes are similar for both conservative and surgical treatment. There are several factors implicated in the high complication rates one sees in the management of ankle fractures in patients with diabetic neuropathy. Many of these patients have significant osteopenia. The combination of ... continue reading
    By Nicholas Romansky, DPM, and Todd Becker, DPM
    125,541 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/06
    Podiatric physicians commonly see fifth metatarsal fractures when treating active patients. The actual rate of occurrence is unknown but some estimate the rate at somewhere between 0.7 and 1.9 percent of all foot fractures. Fractures of the fifth metatarsal can occur at a number of locations and while some of these respond well to conservative treatment, other fractures have been notoriously hard to heal with high rates of nonunion and other complications. Proper classification of these fractures and a strong understanding of the mechanism of injury will help guide the podiatric physician ... continue reading
    By Paul R. Scherer, DPM
    13,964 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/06
    There is no other disease that so profoundly deforms the human foot as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The pain symptoms from RA foot deformities limit mobility significantly in patients from adolescents to seniors. Although diabetes affects a greater number of people in the United States, the morbidity from RA is more severe. A podiatrist’s expertise in the mechanical treatment of the rheumatoid foot is not only a professional obligation but also a guarantee of continued referrals from the rh ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    3,234 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/06
    Every now and then, I catch an episode of Bravo’s Inside The Actor’s Studio. At the end of the hour, the interviewee participates in a pithy, amusing and sometimes revealing questionnaire. One of the standard questions is “What is your least favorite word?” For me, it would be two words: conventional and assumption. Those who assume are too lazy to seek out the truth. Conventional implies there is one predominant way of doing things but the dynamic nature of our lives suggests different models. Interestingly enough, a number of articles in this month’s issue offer challeng ... continue reading
    By Rachel A. Janowicz, DPM
    36,266 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/06
    The United States Figure Skating Association (USFSA) regulates the testing and competition of 170,000 members, a number that represents a 63 percent increase over just one decade. This surge in popularity can be partially attributed to figure skating becoming more financially accessible in lieu of the newer focus on only the freestyle aspect of the sport. The success of American figure skaters like Michelle Kwan and Brian Boitano have also increased the popularity of the sport. This greater participation has subsequently brought about a higher level of competition. Both the athletic and a ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    6,977 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/06
    Given the substantial rates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in hospitals, early detection is vital to ensure timely and appropriate treatment. A new molecular test may significantly decrease the amount of time it takes to detect MRSA and possibly reduce transmission of the bacteria, according to the authors of a new study. Researchers who conducted the two-year study, recently published in Critical Care, evaluated over 1,000 patients who had been admitted for longer than 24 hours to a medical intensive care unit (ICU) or surgical ICU. Authors of ... continue reading
    Keywords:
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    6,386 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/06
    While ensuring effective patient care is the primary goal of any podiatric practice, the practice is still a business so cutting costs is an important point of emphasis in keeping the practice operating at peak efficiency. There are a number of avenues that DPMs can seek out in order to cut costs. Podiatrists can take a look at staffing procedures to work more effectively and cut costs. Podiatric practices can also be diligent in their interaction with suppliers to provide more affordable patient care. As far as office space and billing, a number of options are available to reduce overhead co ... continue reading
    By Eric A. Barp, DPM, and W. Ashton Nickles, DPM
    15,022 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/06
    The Charcot foot and ankle is a challenging clinical entity for the qualified foot and ankle surgeon. It is a progressive disease with insidious onset. Osteoarthropathy was originally described in 1703 but it wasn’t until 1868 that it was called Charcot neuroarthropathy due to Charcot’s work in linking the disease to tabes dorsalis and neuropathy.1,2 It was Jordan who linked this destructive disease — which is associated with joint dislocation, breakdown and pathologic fracture — with diabetes mellitus.3 Osteoarthropathy has an incidence ranging from 0.16 percen ... continue reading