Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • April 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 4
    By Anthony Leone, Special Projects Editor
    5,825 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    When it comes to adjunctive modalities for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy, podiatrists may want to consider the supplement Metanx (Pamlab). Two podiatrists cite the modality as a safe and effective treatment option for those with diabetic neuropathy. Comprised of 2.8 mg of L-methylfolate, 25 mg of pyrioxal 5’-phosphate (B6) and 2 mg of methylcobalamin (B12), Metanx has been proven to increase nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and improve endothelial function, according to Allen Jacobs, DPM, and Theodore Varoz, DPM, PCPM, DFW. Dr. Jacobs notes that B6 facilitates neural regeneration and B12 ... continue reading
    Overbooking appointments and having staff act annoyed when patients ask how much longer the wait will be are two things that irritate patients, and may lead to them going elsewhere for podiatric care.
    By Michael Z. Metzger, DPM, MBA
    4,393 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Successful DPMs know the right formulas for keeping patients. One should manage medical information professionally, run an efficient office, listen to patient concerns and always keep the patient foremost in mind. On the flip side, if a podiatric practice engages in certain other behaviors, the podiatrist will likely see more than a few patients walk out the door without returning any time soon. That said, here are pearls on what not to do to keep a thriving practice. Unlike articles that suggest ideas to help you keep patients, I absolutely guarantee that the ideas presented in this article ... continue reading

    5,315 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    For patients with dermatological conditions, a new product may be able to provide some relief. Ammonium Lactate Cream 12% is indicated for ichthyosis vulgaris and xerosis, according to the manufacturer, Paddock Laboratories. The product offers 12% lactic acid neutralized with ammonium hydroxide, according to the company. As Paddock Labs says, when one applies lactic acid to the skin, it may decrease corneocyte cohesion. In addition, the company says an in vitro study showed that in cadaver skin, 6.1 percent of the Ammonium Lactate Cream was absorbed in 68 hours. It is available in a lot... continue reading
    The podiatry profession places too much emphasis on the subtalar and midtarsal joints, according to Christopher Nester, BSc, PhD. (Photo courtesy of Arnold Ross, DPM)
    Guest Clinical Editor: Bruce Williams, DPM
    8,218 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Although what one learned in podiatric medical school is invaluable in a podiatry career, sometimes podiatrists may encounter a different reality in clinical practice. These expert panelists weigh what they learned in school with their experience and the current research. They also detail which directions future orthotic research should take. Q: What is the current research telling us about how the foot really functions as opposed to what many podiatrists were taught in school? A: Much of the current research focuses on the importance of the midtarsal joint(s) and how they have a ... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    1,803 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I have never been much of a fan of American football. This is partly due to a trauma related to the game early in my life. My father took me to a University of Montana Grizzly game when I was 5 years old. Naturally, we sat in the cheap seats, rickety bleachers used mostly by impoverished students and my father. It was my first opportunity to watch a football game and I tried to concentrate but the tedium of timeouts, huddles and slow movement of huge men adorned in padding and helmets caused me to daydream. I dozed off, fell out of the bleachers and fractured my clavicle. I swore off football... continue reading
    By Patrick A. DeHeer, DPM
    18,490 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    When a foot and ankle specialist is involved as part of the medical staff for a college or professional basketball team, the demands on injury prevention and rehabilitation are significant. This high level of specialized care in the professional and collegiate setting involves several people, including the players, coaches, trainer, other medical staff and management in professional teams. Since treatment can involve the careers of those associated with the team, there is a certain amount of pressure on the treating physician. With so much at stake, two critical factors play an integral ro... continue reading
    This is a spiral shaft fracture that resulted from a twisting injury. Note the medial displacement and shortening of the distal fragment.
    By Nicholas Romansky, DPM, and Todd Becker, DPM
    124,314 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Podiatric physicians commonly see fifth metatarsal fractures when treating active patients. The actual rate of occurrence is unknown but some estimate the rate at somewhere between 0.7 and 1.9 percent of all foot fractures. Fractures of the fifth metatarsal can occur at a number of locations and while some of these respond well to conservative treatment, other fractures have been notoriously hard to heal with high rates of nonunion and other complications. Proper classification of these fractures and a strong understanding of the mechanism of injury will help guide the podiatric physician ... continue reading
    In particular, when one is managing diabetic ankle fractures, the treating physician should have a high index of suspicion for the development of Charcot.
    By Alan R. Catanzariti, DPM, Robert W. Mendicino, DPM, and Travis L. Sautter, DPM
    17,083 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Ankle fractures in patients with diabetes and documented neuropathy present a significant challenge to the clinician. The majority of literature has indicated that ankle fractures in this particular patient population are often difficult to manage and complication rates are reportedly quite high. These poor outcomes are similar for both conservative and surgical treatment. There are several factors implicated in the high complication rates one sees in the management of ankle fractures in patients with diabetic neuropathy. Many of these patients have significant osteopenia. The combination of... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    3,157 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Every now and then, I catch an episode of Bravo’s Inside The Actor’s Studio. At the end of the hour, the interviewee participates in a pithy, amusing and sometimes revealing questionnaire. One of the standard questions is “What is your least favorite word?” For me, it would be two words: conventional and assumption. Those who assume are too lazy to seek out the truth. Conventional implies there is one predominant way of doing things but the dynamic nature of our lives suggests different models. Interestingly enough, a number of articles in this month’s issue offer challeng... continue reading
    A 49-year-old female presented with ankle joint dorsiflexion motion limited by 10 degrees and pain at the end of the range of motion. As one can see in this X-ray, she had a significant hallux abducto valgus deformity with transverse plane subluxation.
    By Paul R. Scherer, DPM
    13,807 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    There is no other disease that so profoundly deforms the human foot as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The pain symptoms from RA foot deformities limit mobility significantly in patients from adolescents to seniors. Although diabetes affects a greater number of people in the United States, the morbidity from RA is more severe. A podiatrist’s expertise in the mechanical treatment of the rheumatoid foot is not only a professional obligation but also a guarantee of continued referrals from the rh... continue reading