Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • March 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 3
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    6,587 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The benefits of exercise in preventing diabetes and improving general health are well established. Can exercise also facilitate improved wound healing among older adults? A recent study in the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences found that wounds healed faster for patients who exercised compared to those who engaged in no activity. The study involved 28 healthy adults with a mean age of 61. The patients were assigned either to an exercise or non-exercise group. Researchers created small wounds on patients and conducted wound measurement three times a week to calculate the heali... continue reading
    In a recent review of current literature on the use of herbal therapies and vitamin/mineral supplements for people with diabetes, the authors found that the herbal extracts from American ginseng and cocina indica showed good glycemic control results.
    By John Hahn, DPM, ND
    15,782 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Nearly 21 million people in the United States have diabetes, according to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Approximately 6.2 million of these people are not aware they have the disease. The CDC also estimates that over 40 million people have pre-diabetes, a condition that increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Over 20 percent of adults 60 years of age and older have diabetes. ... continue reading
    By Jerome K. Steck, DPM, FACFAS, and George Vito, DPM, FACFAS
    5,638 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I read the recent article “A New Solution For The Arthritic Ankle?” (see page 36, December 2005) with interest. I applaud the authors for their work and agree that this is an option for patients with degenerative joint disease of the ankle. George R. Vito, DPM, et. al., accurately point out that there are few surgeons who have total ankle implant training and regularly perform this procedure. I have had years of training with the inventor of the only FDA approved ankle implant, and have performed a tremendous number of these procedures successfuly. Unfortunately, the authors’ review o... continue reading
    By David Edward Marcinko, MBA, CMP, CFP
    6,892 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Fees are down, expenses are up and the days of fat profit margins for physicians are over. Managed care in some form is here to stay. The tidal wave of baby boomers approaching retirement suggests the pendulum will not swing back to the “good old days” of fee-for-service medicine. The U.S. government, the payer for more than 50 percent of the covered population, continues to ratchet down reimbursement. Accordingly, many doctors are now working harder than ever. Unfortunately, they are also prone to irrational investing behavior and making more investment mistakes than ever before. Here... continue reading
    Here one can see midfoot Charcot in a 52-year-old patient with type 1 diabetes.
    By Glenn Weinraub, DPM
    11,700 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    It is well established that poorly controlled diabetes mellitus leads to vasculopathy, immunopathy and neuropathy, all of which may contribute to osteopathy. However, in order to understand the nuances of bone healing in the diabetic population, one must first have a strong grasp of the fundamentals of bone biology and biomechanics (see “A Helpful Primer On Bone Structure” below). Bone is a dynamic medium with a multifactorial purpose including support of soft tissues, protection of soft tissues, locomotion and being a mineral reservoir. The growth, maintenance and healing of bone require... continue reading
    When screening diabetic feet, one should evaluate nail abnormalities including onychocryptosis (as shown above) and onychomycosis.
    By Peter Blume, DPM, Jared T. Wilkinson, DPM, and Jonathan J. Key, DPM
    22,328 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Due to the nature of the disease, the diabetic patient population has an increased risk of developing nail abnormalities, including onychocryptosis, onychomycosis and other nail structure malformations and injuries. Over one-third of diabetic patients suffer from nail abnormalities and are 2.77 times more likely to have nail mycoses compared to the general population.1 ... continue reading
    Here is a photo of an Achilles tendon wound 10 days after debridement and application of the Integra dressing and VAC therapy. It is now ready for a split thickness skin graft. (Photo courtesy of Stephanie Wu, DPM, and David Armstrong, DPM)
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    7,397 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Which emerging treatments show promise in treating lower-extremity wounds? Our expert panelists detail their usage of various wound care modalities, including topical antimicrobials and negative pressure wound therapy. They also take a look at what the future may bring for wound healing. Q: What new modalities do you use in the treatment of lower extremity wounds? A: When foot ulcers are complicated by impaired microcirculation and secondary infection, Steven Kravitz, DPM, uses the Circulator Boot™ (Circulator Boot Corp.) to help treat patients for whom revascularizati... continue reading
    Here one can see early flattening of a metatarsal head. This is best noted with MRI.
    By Justin Franson, DPM, and Babak Baravarian, DPM
    49,750 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    As practitioners of the foot and ankle, some conditions and their treatment options become second nature to us. For example, it seems we are fairly comfortable with the treatment options associated with a degenerated first metatarsophalangeal joint. However, what does one do with the patient who has pain at the ball of the foot when X-rays reveal flattening of the second metatarsal head and degenerative changes in the second metatarsophalangeal joint? The answer probably should be, “Well, it depends.” Freiberg’s disease can vary in severity and typically undergoes a progression over tim... continue reading
    This intraoperative photo shows the first metatarsophalangeal joint with the silicone implant removed. Note the erosion of the proximal phalanx and the first metatarsal head. (Photo courtesy of Graham A. Hamilton, DPM)
    By Kerry Zang, DPM, Shahram Askari, DPM, A’Nedra Fuller, DPM, and Chris Seuferling, DPM
    40,816 reads | 2 comments | 09/03/08
    Addressing the biomechanics of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) as well as the first ray are the keys to any surgical correction of first metatarsal pathology. According to Rootian theory, the principal etiologies of hallux limitus are as follows.1 • A long first metatarsal or when the position of the first metatarsal head is relative to the second. When the first metatarsal is long, there will be jamming of the metatarsophalangeal joint during the initiation of the propulsive phase of gait. This causes a reduction in the range of dorsiflexion of the hallux and in... continue reading
    By Anthony Leone, Special Projects Editor
    2,863 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Whether clinicians are combating painful symptoms associated with osteoarthritis or easing the postoperative pain of patients, clinicians have found a key ally with a medication that has been around for 30 years. A non-selective, non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug, Nalfon (fenoprofen) is a proprionic acid derivative that is available in 200 mg, immediate release capsules. Clinicians have written over 37 million prescriptions for Nalfon since its FDA approval in 1976, according to Pedinol, which acquired the drug last year. Nalfon provides mild to moderate pain relief in 15 to 30 minutes ... continue reading