Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • March 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 3
    Here is a view of preulcerative calluses. When examining patients who may have diabetic peripheral neuropathy, one should perform a complete dermatologic exam including the evaluation of dyshidrosis, callosities, ulcerations and other abnormalities.
    By Kathleen Satterfield, DPM
    28,678 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a “diagnosis of exclusion.” Diagnostic challenges are one thing but few practitioners relish that phrase when it comes to DPN. For this condition, the practitioner needs to cast a very wide net of tests and keep an open mind regarding clinical suspicion in order to reach an accurate diagnostic conclusion. How likely is it that there could be another neuropathy-causing disease or medical condition resulting in these same lower extremity symptoms? Does the podiatric physician really need to consider thyroid problems, vitamin B12 deficiencies, nerve en... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    2,484 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       I have a small list of items that I prefer patients not bring to the office when they come for care. What is on the list?    • Supersized 32-oz. soft drinks    • Guns    • Pets    • Cell phones    The problem with 32-oz. soft drinks is obvious. I manipulate the painful heel. The patient lets out a screech and the Cherry Coke bounces off the ceiling before cascading onto my bald head.    Guns are a unique and challenging problem. I live in a rural community where... continue reading
    Here one can see a simple, inexpensive and effective bolster dressing for the recipient site. Note the non-adherent dressing cover that is stapled around the perimeter of the wound and to itself over a saline-soaked sponge.
    By Thomas Zgonis, DPM, Thomas S. Roukis, DPM, and Douglas T. Cromack, MD, FACS
    18,493 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The goal of soft tissue coverage is to restore form and function. However, due to the anatomic complexity of the foot and ankle, soft tissue coverage in this area often falls short of Sir Harold Gillies’ adage to “… replace like with like.”1,2 Ideally, soft tissue coverage of the foot and ankle would involve primary repair free of tension and utilize neighboring sensate native tissue that is capable of withstanding the forces sustained during gait.1-3 Soft tissue wound coverage employs various forms of conservative and surgical techniques aimed at creating rapid... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    3,022 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       I have long since given up looking for logic from the Bush administration. However, the recently proposed cuts in funding for diabetes research certainly fly in the face of very disturbing statistics about the prevalence and impact of this disease.    According to a recent news article in Diabetes Today, the proposed budget numbers would slash $11 million from funding for the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease, a research division of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and $20 million from funding for chronic disea... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    6,599 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The benefits of exercise in preventing diabetes and improving general health are well established. Can exercise also facilitate improved wound healing among older adults? A recent study in the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences found that wounds healed faster for patients who exercised compared to those who engaged in no activity. The study involved 28 healthy adults with a mean age of 61. The patients were assigned either to an exercise or non-exercise group. Researchers created small wounds on patients and conducted wound measurement three times a week to calculate the heali... continue reading
    In a recent review of current literature on the use of herbal therapies and vitamin/mineral supplements for people with diabetes, the authors found that the herbal extracts from American ginseng and cocina indica showed good glycemic control results.
    By John Hahn, DPM, ND
    15,805 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Nearly 21 million people in the United States have diabetes, according to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Approximately 6.2 million of these people are not aware they have the disease. The CDC also estimates that over 40 million people have pre-diabetes, a condition that increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Over 20 percent of adults 60 years of age and older have diabetes. ... continue reading
    By Jerome K. Steck, DPM, FACFAS, and George Vito, DPM, FACFAS
    5,645 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I read the recent article “A New Solution For The Arthritic Ankle?” (see page 36, December 2005) with interest. I applaud the authors for their work and agree that this is an option for patients with degenerative joint disease of the ankle. George R. Vito, DPM, et. al., accurately point out that there are few surgeons who have total ankle implant training and regularly perform this procedure. I have had years of training with the inventor of the only FDA approved ankle implant, and have performed a tremendous number of these procedures successfuly. Unfortunately, the authors’ review o... continue reading
    By David Edward Marcinko, MBA, CMP, CFP
    6,901 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Fees are down, expenses are up and the days of fat profit margins for physicians are over. Managed care in some form is here to stay. The tidal wave of baby boomers approaching retirement suggests the pendulum will not swing back to the “good old days” of fee-for-service medicine. The U.S. government, the payer for more than 50 percent of the covered population, continues to ratchet down reimbursement. Accordingly, many doctors are now working harder than ever. Unfortunately, they are also prone to irrational investing behavior and making more investment mistakes than ever before. Here... continue reading
    Here one can see midfoot Charcot in a 52-year-old patient with type 1 diabetes.
    By Glenn Weinraub, DPM
    11,735 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    It is well established that poorly controlled diabetes mellitus leads to vasculopathy, immunopathy and neuropathy, all of which may contribute to osteopathy. However, in order to understand the nuances of bone healing in the diabetic population, one must first have a strong grasp of the fundamentals of bone biology and biomechanics (see “A Helpful Primer On Bone Structure” below). Bone is a dynamic medium with a multifactorial purpose including support of soft tissues, protection of soft tissues, locomotion and being a mineral reservoir. The growth, maintenance and healing of bone require... continue reading
    When screening diabetic feet, one should evaluate nail abnormalities including onychocryptosis (as shown above) and onychomycosis.
    By Peter Blume, DPM, Jared T. Wilkinson, DPM, and Jonathan J. Key, DPM
    22,357 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Due to the nature of the disease, the diabetic patient population has an increased risk of developing nail abnormalities, including onychocryptosis, onychomycosis and other nail structure malformations and injuries. Over one-third of diabetic patients suffer from nail abnormalities and are 2.77 times more likely to have nail mycoses compared to the general population.1 ... continue reading