Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • March 2006 | Volume 19 - Issue 3
    Here is a photo of an Achilles tendon wound 10 days after debridement and application of the Integra dressing and VAC therapy. It is now ready for a split thickness skin graft. (Photo courtesy of Stephanie Wu, DPM, and David Armstrong, DPM)
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    7,420 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Which emerging treatments show promise in treating lower-extremity wounds? Our expert panelists detail their usage of various wound care modalities, including topical antimicrobials and negative pressure wound therapy. They also take a look at what the future may bring for wound healing. Q: What new modalities do you use in the treatment of lower extremity wounds? A: When foot ulcers are complicated by impaired microcirculation and secondary infection, Steven Kravitz, DPM, uses the Circulator Boot™ (Circulator Boot Corp.) to help treat patients for whom revascularizati... continue reading
    Here one can see early flattening of a metatarsal head. This is best noted with MRI.
    By Justin Franson, DPM, and Babak Baravarian, DPM
    49,954 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    As practitioners of the foot and ankle, some conditions and their treatment options become second nature to us. For example, it seems we are fairly comfortable with the treatment options associated with a degenerated first metatarsophalangeal joint. However, what does one do with the patient who has pain at the ball of the foot when X-rays reveal flattening of the second metatarsal head and degenerative changes in the second metatarsophalangeal joint? The answer probably should be, “Well, it depends.” Freiberg’s disease can vary in severity and typically undergoes a progression over tim... continue reading
    This intraoperative photo shows the first metatarsophalangeal joint with the silicone implant removed. Note the erosion of the proximal phalanx and the first metatarsal head. (Photo courtesy of Graham A. Hamilton, DPM)
    By Kerry Zang, DPM, Shahram Askari, DPM, A’Nedra Fuller, DPM, and Chris Seuferling, DPM
    40,873 reads | 2 comments | 09/03/08
    Addressing the biomechanics of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) as well as the first ray are the keys to any surgical correction of first metatarsal pathology. According to Rootian theory, the principal etiologies of hallux limitus are as follows.1 • A long first metatarsal or when the position of the first metatarsal head is relative to the second. When the first metatarsal is long, there will be jamming of the metatarsophalangeal joint during the initiation of the propulsive phase of gait. This causes a reduction in the range of dorsiflexion of the hallux and in... continue reading
    By Anthony Leone, Special Projects Editor
    2,872 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Whether clinicians are combating painful symptoms associated with osteoarthritis or easing the postoperative pain of patients, clinicians have found a key ally with a medication that has been around for 30 years. A non-selective, non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug, Nalfon (fenoprofen) is a proprionic acid derivative that is available in 200 mg, immediate release capsules. Clinicians have written over 37 million prescriptions for Nalfon since its FDA approval in 1976, according to Pedinol, which acquired the drug last year. Nalfon provides mild to moderate pain relief in 15 to 30 minutes ... continue reading
    Here one can see a 72-year-old male with a postsurgical wound dehiscence of a transmetatarsal amputation. The wound has undergone maggot debridement.
    By Stephanie C. Wu, DPM, MS, Lawrence A. Lavery, DPM, MPH, and David G. Armstrong, DPM, PhD
    8,935 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Non-healing skin ulcerations of the lower extremities affect millions of people in the United States and impose tremendous medical, psychosocial and financial impact. These wounds may be secondary to a myriad of etiologies including pressure, metabolic, trauma, venous, arterial etiologies and diabetic neuropathy.1 The Wound Healing Society defines chronic ulcerations as wounds that have “failed to proceed through an orderly and timely process to produce anatomic and functional integrity, or proceeded through the repair process without establishing a sustained anatomic and functi... continue reading

    6,123 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Several bandages are now available in one convenient package to hand out to patients. Physician Packs include CoFlex®, CoFlex® Med and latex-free CoFlex® NL bandages, according to the manufacturer Andover Coated Products. As the company notes, the bandages feature EasyTear® technology. Patients can easily apply and remove them, and the bandages all have non-slip support. With the compact box design and smaller roll counts, Physician Packs are easy to store. The company adds that the tan-colored packs are available in sizes from 1 to 4 inche... continue reading
    Here is a view of preulcerative calluses. When examining patients who may have diabetic peripheral neuropathy, one should perform a complete dermatologic exam including the evaluation of dyshidrosis, callosities, ulcerations and other abnormalities.
    By Kathleen Satterfield, DPM
    28,679 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a “diagnosis of exclusion.” Diagnostic challenges are one thing but few practitioners relish that phrase when it comes to DPN. For this condition, the practitioner needs to cast a very wide net of tests and keep an open mind regarding clinical suspicion in order to reach an accurate diagnostic conclusion. How likely is it that there could be another neuropathy-causing disease or medical condition resulting in these same lower extremity symptoms? Does the podiatric physician really need to consider thyroid problems, vitamin B12 deficiencies, nerve en... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    2,484 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       I have a small list of items that I prefer patients not bring to the office when they come for care. What is on the list?    • Supersized 32-oz. soft drinks    • Guns    • Pets    • Cell phones    The problem with 32-oz. soft drinks is obvious. I manipulate the painful heel. The patient lets out a screech and the Cherry Coke bounces off the ceiling before cascading onto my bald head.    Guns are a unique and challenging problem. I live in a rural community where... continue reading
    Here one can see a simple, inexpensive and effective bolster dressing for the recipient site. Note the non-adherent dressing cover that is stapled around the perimeter of the wound and to itself over a saline-soaked sponge.
    By Thomas Zgonis, DPM, Thomas S. Roukis, DPM, and Douglas T. Cromack, MD, FACS
    18,493 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The goal of soft tissue coverage is to restore form and function. However, due to the anatomic complexity of the foot and ankle, soft tissue coverage in this area often falls short of Sir Harold Gillies’ adage to “… replace like with like.”1,2 Ideally, soft tissue coverage of the foot and ankle would involve primary repair free of tension and utilize neighboring sensate native tissue that is capable of withstanding the forces sustained during gait.1-3 Soft tissue wound coverage employs various forms of conservative and surgical techniques aimed at creating rapid... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    3,022 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       I have long since given up looking for logic from the Bush administration. However, the recently proposed cuts in funding for diabetes research certainly fly in the face of very disturbing statistics about the prevalence and impact of this disease.    According to a recent news article in Diabetes Today, the proposed budget numbers would slash $11 million from funding for the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease, a research division of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and $20 million from funding for chronic disea... continue reading