Volume 19 - Issue 3 - March 2006

Letters »

Raising Questions About Ankle Arthrodiastasis

By Jerome K. Steck, DPM, FACFAS, and George Vito, DPM, FACFAS | 5483 reads | 0 comments

I read the recent article “A New Solution For The Arthritic Ankle?” (see page 36, December 2005) with interest. I applaud the authors for their work and agree that this is an option for patients with degenerative joint disease of the ankle.
George R. Vito, DPM, et. al., accurately point out that there are few surgeons who have total ankle implant training and regularly perform this procedure. I have had years of training with the inventor of the only FDA approved ankle implant, and have performed a tremendous number of these procedures successfuly.
Unfortunately, the authors’ review o



Diabetes Watch »

Understanding The Potential Impact Of Diabetes On Bone Biology And Biomechanics

By Glenn Weinraub, DPM | 11147 reads | 0 comments

It is well established that poorly controlled diabetes mellitus leads to vasculopathy, immunopathy and neuropathy, all of which may contribute to osteopathy. However, in order to understand the nuances of bone healing in the diabetic population, one must first have a strong grasp of the fundamentals of bone biology and biomechanics (see “A Helpful Primer On Bone Structure” below).
Bone is a dynamic medium with a multifactorial purpose including support of soft tissues, protection of soft tissues, locomotion and being a mineral reservoir. The growth, maintenance and healing of bone require



Wound Care Q&A »

Inside Insights On Emerging Wound Care Modalities

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 7085 reads | 0 comments

Which emerging treatments show promise in treating lower-extremity wounds? Our expert panelists detail their usage of various wound care modalities, including topical antimicrobials and negative pressure wound therapy. They also take a look at what the future may bring for wound healing.

Q: What new modalities do you use in the treatment of lower extremity wounds?
A:
When foot ulcers are complicated by impaired microcirculation and secondary infection, Steven Kravitz, DPM, uses the Circulator Boot (Circulator Boot Corp.) to help treat patients for whom revascularizati



Surgical Pearls »

First Metatarsal Pathology: Can An Implant Provide A Long-Term Solution?

By Kerry Zang, DPM, Shahram Askari, DPM, A’Nedra Fuller, DPM, and Chris Seuferling, DPM | 39663 reads | 2 comments

Addressing the biomechanics of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) as well as the first ray are the keys to any surgical correction of first metatarsal pathology. According to Rootian theory, the principal etiologies of hallux limitus are as follows.1
A long first metatarsal or when the position of the first metatarsal head is relative to the second. When the first metatarsal is long, there will be jamming of the metatarsophalangeal joint during the initiation of the propulsive phase of gait. This causes a reduction in the range of dorsiflexion of the hallux and in



Feature »

Closing Difficult Wounds

By Stephanie C. Wu, DPM, MS, Lawrence A. Lavery, DPM, MPH, and David G. Armstrong, DPM, PhD | 8569 reads | 0 comments

Non-healing skin ulcerations of the lower extremities affect millions of people in the United States and impose tremendous medical, psychosocial and financial impact. These wounds may be secondary to a myriad of etiologies including pressure, metabolic, trauma, venous, arterial etiologies and diabetic neuropathy.1
The Wound Healing Society defines chronic ulcerations as wounds that have “failed to proceed through an orderly and timely process to produce anatomic and functional integrity, or proceeded through the repair process without establishing a sustained anatomic and functi



Feature »

How To Diagnose Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

By Kathleen Satterfield, DPM | 27639 reads | 0 comments

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a “diagnosis of exclusion.” Diagnostic challenges are one thing but few practitioners relish that phrase when it comes to DPN.
For this condition, the practitioner needs to cast a very wide net of tests and keep an open mind regarding clinical suspicion in order to reach an accurate diagnostic conclusion. How likely is it that there could be another neuropathy-causing disease or medical condition resulting in these same lower extremity symptoms? Does the podiatric physician really need to consider thyroid problems, vitamin B12 deficiencies, nerve en



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