Volume 19 - Issue 1 - January 2006

News and Trends »

Can Microcirculation Changes Predict Non-Healing Ulcers?

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 14603 reads | 0 comments

   Researchers of a recent study say assessing microcirculation changes may help predict whether diabetic foot ulcers will heal. The authors of the study, which was published in a recent issue of The Lancet, utilized medical hyperspectral imaging to perform these assessments and add that the new technology may help identify patients with diabetes who are at higher risk for foot ulcers.

   Researchers of the study examined 108 patients, including 51 patients with diabetic neuropathy, 36 with diabetes but no neuropathy and 21 control patients without diab



Diabetes Watch »

Reconciling Combination Therapy With EBM: Where Do We Go From Here?

By Kathleen Satterfield, DPM | 8281 reads | 0 comments

   One will not find combination therapies mentioned in evidence based medicine (EBM) journals or in research trials. In fact, one will rarely find combination therapies mentioned in many trade publications either. Purists often claim this concept presents a mixed message. How can one track performance and outcomes if he or she is using combination therapies? What component worked?

   Detractors sometimes call the practice of using combination therapy “the shotgun approach.” They say it does not denote much finesse and represents excess. Proponents weigh i



Feature »

Conquering Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome

By John T. Hester, DPM, MSPT | 121732 reads | 3 comments

   Tibial stress injuries have become an increasingly frequent reason for visits to sports medicine offices and clinics over the past decade. Unfortunately, these patients often leave the office with a diagnosis of shin splints. This nonspecific “diagnosis” has little clinical usefulness in light of the present day understanding of exercise-induced leg pain and, specifically, tibial stress injuries. The term “shin splints” merely describes a symptom of tibial stress injury and has little clinical or diagnostic value.

   Researchers have proposed many



Feature »

Point-Counterpoint: Is External Fixation The Best Option For Calcaneal Fractures?

By Gary Peter Jolly, DPM, FACFAS, and Michael M. Cohen, DPM, FACFAS | 12054 reads | 0 comments

Yes. This author emphasizes the use of external fixation and ligamentotaxis for treating calcaneal fractures, citing key benefits including earlier post-op weightbearing.

By Gary Peter Jolly, DPM, FACFAS

   Intraarticular calcaneal fractures have long been recognized as a devastating injury but, fortunately, they constitute only 2 percent of all fractures. While there is universal agreement on the severity of their impact, there has been anything but a consensus on how practitioners should manage these fractures.

   The history of the treatment of



Feature »

How To Resolve Conflict With Difficult Patients

By John V. Guiliana, DPM, MS | 30966 reads | 2 comments

   Out of the many challenges that business owners face day to day, human conflict is the one that most people lack the skill to handle appropriately. However, learning how to deal with interpersonal conflicts caused by “difficult people” will help enhance patient satisfaction and ultimately improve the productivity of your practice.

   We perceive the “difficult person” in many different ways. He or she may be arrogant, demanding, unrealistic or condescending. Usually, the difficult person is someone who is working from the negative side of his or her



Continuing Education »

Key Insights On Writing Orthotic Prescriptions

By Lawrence Huppin, DPM, and Paul Scherer, DPM | 19121 reads | 0 comments

   When it comes to an effective prescription for custom foot orthoses, podiatrists must consider the dysfunction of that particular patient’s foot in order to achieve a satisfactory clinical outcome. Addressing the specific needs of the pathology producing the dysfunction as well as the symptoms the patient is experiencing makes the difference between treatment success and failure.

   Dispensing the same prescription orthotic for posterior tibial dysfunction and plantar fasciitis will not produce the same successful outcomes as a colleague who prescribes p



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