Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • December 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 12

    16,143 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/05
       Given the nuances of making adjustments to orthotic prescriptions, our expert panelists discuss their approaches in using adjustments such as first ray cutouts and metatarsal pads, and the tools necessary for making modifications. They also discuss which adjustments they will make themselves and which ones they will send out to an orthotics lab. Without further delay, here is what they had to say.    Q: How do you incorporate footwear when determining appropriate orthotic prescriptions?    A: Ideally, Howard Horowitz, DPM, says one s ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    3,415 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/05
       Despite the increased awareness of diabetes in recent years and its potentially devastating complications, the recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers a grim portrait of the effort to curtail and prevent the condition. In the last two years alone, there has been a 14 percent increase in the prevalence of diabetes in the United States (see page 8, “News And Trends”).    The estimated number of Americans with diabetes now stands at 20.8 million people in the United States, a 2.6 million increase from 2003. The CDC es ... continue reading
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM
    16,550 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/05
       Few would argue that football is one of the most popular sports in the United States. There are an estimated 1.5 million high school and junior high school players, and 75,000 college and university athletes who play the sport. Football also has one of the highest injury rates among high school sports. The number of football-related injuries is estimated at 600,000 per year.    The care of football injuries occupies a unique place in sports medicine in the United States. Given the relatively small number of games in each season and the potential for college ... continue reading