Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • December 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 12
    Here is a polypropylene functional foot orthosis with an EVA rearfoot post. Howard Horowitz, DPM, prefers using an extrinsic rearfoot post in order to help control the rearfoot as much as possible immediately after heel strike. (Photo courtesy of Alona Ka

    15,360 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Given the nuances of making adjustments to orthotic prescriptions, our expert panelists discuss their approaches in using adjustments such as first ray cutouts and metatarsal pads, and the tools necessary for making modifications. They also discuss which adjustments they will make themselves and which ones they will send out to an orthotics lab. Without further delay, here is what they had to say.    Q: How do you incorporate footwear when determining appropriate orthotic prescriptions?    A: Ideally, Howard Horowitz, DPM, says one s... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    3,185 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Despite the increased awareness of diabetes in recent years and its potentially devastating complications, the recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers a grim portrait of the effort to curtail and prevent the condition. In the last two years alone, there has been a 14 percent increase in the prevalence of diabetes in the United States (see page 8, “News And Trends”).    The estimated number of Americans with diabetes now stands at 20.8 million people in the United States, a 2.6 million increase from 2003. The CDC es... continue reading
    Achilles tendon ruptures can be caused by the repetition of dropping back to throw the football. A quarterback may throw the football up to 50 times in a game and a few hundred times during practice.
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM
    15,773 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Few would argue that football is one of the most popular sports in the United States. There are an estimated 1.5 million high school and junior high school players, and 75,000 college and university athletes who play the sport. Football also has one of the highest injury rates among high school sports. The number of football-related injuries is estimated at 600,000 per year.    The care of football injuries occupies a unique place in sports medicine in the United States. Given the relatively small number of games in each season and the potential for college... continue reading

    4,866 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    One Gel, Many Uses    Are your patients looking for a multiple product package that offers numerous benefits and more convenience? Look no further than the All Gel Care Kit™, which combines several gel foot care products from Silipos in one kit. The company says this packaging facilitates easy dispensing in the office.    Silipos says the gel products protect patients against shear forces and friction, and also release a mineral oil to condition and moisturize feet.    The All Gel Care Kit complements the original Digi... continue reading
    Here is a preoperative X-ray that reveals painful arthritis of the ankle in a 57-year-old male patient.
    By George R. Vito, DPM, Floyd L. Pacheco, Jr., DPM, Charles Southerland, DPM, Edgardo Rodriguez, DPM, and Shannon Thompson, DPM
    27,996 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Arthritis of the ankle can be a painful and disabling condition. Clinicians can effectively treat mild or moderate arthritis with conservative therapies and joint preserving surgical procedures.1-5 Advanced cases that do not respond to more conservative measures require aggressive surgery. Traditional procedures for severe ankle arthritis pain include ankle arthrodesis and arthroplasty with implant. These are lengthy, usually invasive procedures that can successfully treat severe ankle arthritis but they also have some serious surgical risks.    R... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    3,395 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Two years ago, I finished a 10-year period as a member of my state podiatric medical licensing board. During that period, I frequently wondered what a podiatrist must feel when he or she receives a registered letter with a notification of a complaint to the board.    Complaints against DPMs came from a variety of sources. Most were from disgruntled patients. Some came from other DPMs, especially when a partnership between two podiatrists breaks up. Some came from the board of pharmacy when a DPM was perceived to be over-prescribing narcotics or possibly Via... continue reading
    Here is a close-up view of purulent exudate with a paronychia.
    By Alexander Reyzelman, DPM
    72,636 reads | 3 comments | 09/03/08
       Ingrown toenails are one of the most common presenting pedal foot maladies with an estimated 20 percent of those who present seeking foot care for this problem.1,2 Chemical matrixectomy is one of the most common surgical procedures podiatrists perform. Although the technique for the matrixectomy procedure is fairly simple and straightforward, there are many modifications to the procedure and there are controversial issues including the use of adjunctive antibiotics and postoperative care.    In order to understand the evolution of the procedure, o... continue reading
    The overall incidence of diabetes may be increasing due to declining diets and sedentary lifestyles, notes Ken Rehm, DPM.
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    6,058 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       The prevalence of diabetes in the United States has increased by 14 percent in the last two years, according to a recent report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The report concludes that 20.8 million people in the U.S., 7 percent of the population, have the disease and 6.2 million of these people are undiagnosed. In 2003, an estimated 18.2 million people had diabetes, according to the CDC.    Why the rapid rise in diabetes prevalence in just two years? The overall incidence of diabetes may be increasing due to declining diets and sed... continue reading
    By Martin C. Yorath, DPM
    10,215 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       It is important to appreciate where the preoperative history and physical examination fits into the overall patient history and physical (H&P) hierarchy. As noted in the previous article (see “Why Complete H&Ps Should Be More Common In Podiatry,” page 56, September issue), the preoperative history and physical examination are essential for screening patients and assessing possible surgical risks.    After evaluating these findings, podiatric physicians can make decisions regarding their patients’ suitability and stability to undergo a planned foot or... continue reading
    As you can see, this diabetic patient has an infected neuropathic ulcer and a gangrenous digit. (Photo courtesy of Lawrence Karlock, DPM)
    By Mark Kosinski, DPM, and Warren Joseph, DPM
    54,481 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Many exciting antibiotics have either recently been approved, received a new FDA indication or will soon become available. Some are well known and have already been incorporated into clinical practice. Many are the first in their respective classes and have novel mechanisms of action. What place, if any, do these drugs have in the treatment of diabetic foot infections (DFIs)?    That said, let us take a look at a number of newer as well as time-tested antibiotics and assess their efficacy for DFIs.    • Linezolid (Zyvox, Pfizer) and q... continue reading