Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
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  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • November 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 11
    By Don Buddecke, DPM and Michael S. Lee, DPM
    46,719 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/05
       Calcaneal fractures continue to be one of the most complicated injuries of the lower extremity. Satisfactory outcomes are difficult to achieve and require extensive experience and understanding in treating the injury. Calcaneal fractures are much like pilon fractures of the distal tibia in that they are severe soft tissue injuries complicated by fracture of the heel bone. The importance of the soft tissue envelope cannot be overstated.    There continues to be a wide range of treatment strategies despite the significant ongoing research on this injury. Cast ... continue reading
    By Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor
    7,918 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/05
       Doctors are turning to Biofreeze to manage the pain associated with a variety of ailments affecting the lower extremities. Available in a gel, roll-on or no-touch natural Cryospray™, the product provides a pain relief period that generally lasts 30 percent longer than conventional gels, according to its manufacturer, Performance Health, Inc.    Biofreeze works through cryotherapy. In essence, it decreases blood flow and confuses nerve endings. This in turn numbs the affected area and results in a decrease in inflammation. The formula contains Ilex, an he ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    5,389 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/05
       There is no doubt that podiatrists see quite a bit of heel pain. Plantar fasciitis accounts for 11 to 15 percent of all foot symptoms in adults, according to an article published in the New England Journal of Medicine last year. As Stephen Barrett, DPM, points out in his cover story, “A Guide To Neurogenic Etiologies” (see page 36), projected estimates indicate that greater than two million patients per year are diagnosed with heel pain in the United States.    However, despite the prevalence of this condition, there are complex anatomical consid ... continue reading