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  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • November 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 11
    By Douglas H. Richie, Jr., DPM
    32,917 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/05
       Heel pain is the most common musculoskeletal complaint of patients presenting to the podiatric physician. While heel pain is estimated to comprise 10 percent of athletic injuries, the incidence of heel pain in the active and sedentary population appears to be significantly underreported in the medical literature. Most experienced practitioners report that heel pain complaints have risen to epidemic proportion over the past 20 years for reasons we still do not fully understand.    Certainly, changing demographics figures into the equation. The average patient ... continue reading
    By Lara M. Allman, DPM
    6,536 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/05
       The year was 1996. I had finally graduated podiatry school. It felt great except for the large sum of loans that had accumulated. Four years and $100,000-plus in debt, it seemed like a black hole with no end in sight. A few months before graduation, the student loan department gave each of us a crash course on our loans, teaching us terms such as deferment, consolidation and prime rate. Deferment sounded good, especially if the residency salary left much to be desired. ... continue reading
    By Lisa M. Schoene, DPM, ATC
    49,331 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/05
       Given the common incidence of heel pain, patients may present to the office with symptoms that have been present anywhere between two or three weeks to perhaps two or three years. Often, these patients have already consulted with another clinician who had an incorrect approach to treatment. When the pain does not resolve, the patient may feel that he or she has to undergo an unnecessary surgical procedure.    This is unfortunate as the problem may be due to improper care. If the treating clinician does not implement the proper treatment plan, including foll ... continue reading