Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • November 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 11
    By Lisa M. Schoene, DPM, ATC
    46,325 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Given the common incidence of heel pain, patients may present to the office with symptoms that have been present anywhere between two or three weeks to perhaps two or three years. Often, these patients have already consulted with another clinician who had an incorrect approach to treatment. When the pain does not resolve, the patient may feel that he or she has to undergo an unnecessary surgical procedure.    This is unfortunate as the problem may be due to improper care. If the treating clinician does not implement the proper treatment plan, including foll ... continue reading
    This patient has a painful neuropathic foot. A new study involving 100 patients with neuropathy found that the majority of patients had significant pain reduction a year after undergoing peripheral nerve decompression. (Photo courtesy of Stephen Barrett,
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    13,938 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       While previous studies have touted the benefits of peripheral nerve decompression for patients with neuropathy, a new study in the Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association (JAPMA) reveals positive effects on sensation, neuropathic pain and patient balance. Authors of the study found that 87 percent of patients with numbness reported improved sensation and 92 percent who had preoperative balance problems had improved balance a year after undergoing the procedure.    According to the study, which involved 60 patients with diabetic neuropat... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    5,429 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       From scheduling appointments to answering patient questions to billing, DPMs would be lost without competent and productive staff members. Indeed, having a good support staff is essential to a successful practice. However, with the hustle and bustle of everyday practice, it can be easy for staff to get bogged down in tasks. How can DPMs maximize the productivity of their staff?    Part of increasing productivity involves motivation and Lynn Homisak, PRT, says this requires a keen understanding of each individual, being interested in his or her needs and kno... continue reading