Volume 18 - Issue 11 - November 2005

Technology In Practice »

A Closer Look At A Versatile Cryotherapy Solution For Pain

By Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor | 6881 reads | 0 comments

   Doctors are turning to Biofreeze to manage the pain associated with a variety of ailments affecting the lower extremities. Available in a gel, roll-on or no-touch natural Cryospray™, the product provides a pain relief period that generally lasts 30 percent longer than conventional gels, according to its manufacturer, Performance Health, Inc.

   Biofreeze works through cryotherapy. In essence, it decreases blood flow and confuses nerve endings. This in turn numbs the affected area and results in a decrease in inflammation. The formula contains Ilex, an he



Treatment Dilemmas »

When Second MPJ Overload Occurs Without Hammertoe Deformity

By Babak Baravarian, DPM | 46901 reads | 0 comments

   It is not uncommon to see one patient every day on my practice schedule who has pain and inflammation of the second metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ). While there are cases that involve a hammertoe associated with metatarsophalangeal joint pain, what are the options for treating patients who have pain in the second metatarsophalangeal joint but do not have a hammertoe deformity?

   When it comes to cases of so-called “capsulitis of the second MPJ,” we try all kinds of different therapy with little consideration of a proper diagnosis and diagnostic testing.



Wound Care Q&A »

How To Manage Traumatic Wounds Successfully

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 22338 reads | 0 comments

   In a follow-up column to the previous discussion of lower extremity traumatic wounds (see “Essential Insights On Managing Traumatic Wounds,” page 32, September issue), the panelists discuss key principles in treating open fracture wounds in the forefoot and toes. They also share their thoughts on the use of plastic surgery techniques and advanced wound closure modalities. Without further delay, here is what the panelists had to say.

   Q: How do you manage simple open fracture wounds in the forefoot/toes?

   A: A. Douglas Spital



Feature »

A Guide To Neurogenic Etiologies Of Heel Pain

By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, MBA | 65007 reads | 0 comments

   While heel pain is the most common condition podiatrists see in practice, heel pain can often be complex and occasionally difficult to treat.1 In recent years, we have seen the introduction of new treatments as logical conservative preludes to fasciotomy, including extracorporeal shockwave therapy, injection of the plantar fascia with autologous growth factors and coblation therapy.2

   Clinicians are able to employ some of these modalities, such as autologous growth factors, due to a better understanding of the true histological and ph



Feature »

Offloading The Plantar Fascia: What You Should Know

By Douglas H. Richie, Jr., DPM | 31125 reads | 0 comments

   Heel pain is the most common musculoskeletal complaint of patients presenting to the podiatric physician. While heel pain is estimated to comprise 10 percent of athletic injuries, the incidence of heel pain in the active and sedentary population appears to be significantly underreported in the medical literature. Most experienced practitioners report that heel pain complaints have risen to epidemic proportion over the past 20 years for reasons we still do not fully understand.

   Certainly, changing demographics figures into the equation. The average patient



Feature »

A Stepwise Approach To Treating Chronic Heel Pain

By Lisa M. Schoene, DPM, ATC | 42952 reads | 0 comments

   Given the common incidence of heel pain, patients may present to the office with symptoms that have been present anywhere between two or three weeks to perhaps two or three years. Often, these patients have already consulted with another clinician who had an incorrect approach to treatment. When the pain does not resolve, the patient may feel that he or she has to undergo an unnecessary surgical procedure.

   This is unfortunate as the problem may be due to improper care. If the treating clinician does not implement the proper treatment plan, including foll