Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • November 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 11
    This calcaneal axial view demonstrates the primary fracture line and medial sustentacular fragement.
    By Don Buddecke, DPM and Michael S. Lee, DPM
    41,760 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Calcaneal fractures continue to be one of the most complicated injuries of the lower extremity. Satisfactory outcomes are difficult to achieve and require extensive experience and understanding in treating the injury. Calcaneal fractures are much like pilon fractures of the distal tibia in that they are severe soft tissue injuries complicated by fracture of the heel bone. The importance of the soft tissue envelope cannot be overstated.    There continues to be a wide range of treatment strategies despite the significant ongoing research on this injury. Cast ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    5,181 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       There is no doubt that podiatrists see quite a bit of heel pain. Plantar fasciitis accounts for 11 to 15 percent of all foot symptoms in adults, according to an article published in the New England Journal of Medicine last year. As Stephen Barrett, DPM, points out in his cover story, “A Guide To Neurogenic Etiologies” (see page 36), projected estimates indicate that greater than two million patients per year are diagnosed with heel pain in the United States.    However, despite the prevalence of this condition, there are complex anatomical consid... continue reading
    By John Mozena, DPM, PC, and Tyler Marshall, DPM
    15,272 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       One of the most documented postoperative complications of distal metatarsal osteotomies is adhesive capsulodesis that limits dorsiflexion of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ). When faced with such a post-op complication, one may be able to use a proven cartilage preservation procedure that maintains, if not improves, the first MPJ range of motion.    Austin and Leventon first described the Austin bunionectomy in 1962 and the original procedure has undergone many modifications over the years.1 Each modification has different indications and... continue reading
    DPMs say patients respond well to Biofreeze, which uses cryotherapy to treat painful conditions including neuropathy.
    By Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor
    7,220 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Doctors are turning to Biofreeze to manage the pain associated with a variety of ailments affecting the lower extremities. Available in a gel, roll-on or no-touch natural Cryospray™, the product provides a pain relief period that generally lasts 30 percent longer than conventional gels, according to its manufacturer, Performance Health, Inc.    Biofreeze works through cryotherapy. In essence, it decreases blood flow and confuses nerve endings. This in turn numbs the affected area and results in a decrease in inflammation. The formula contains Ilex, an he... continue reading
    When patients present with pain in the second metatarsophalangeal joint, the author says they often experience pain with high heels (as shown above) and hard-soled shoes, but can also report pain with flat shoes as well.
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    53,728 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    This patient sustained an open crush injury to the talus when a railroad beam fell on his foot. Lawrence DiDomenico, DPM, says it is more common to see open fractures of the phalanges with crush injuries. (Photo courtesy of Robert Mendicino, DPM, and Alan
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    23,427 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       In a follow-up column to the previous discussion of lower extremity traumatic wounds (see “Essential Insights On Managing Traumatic Wounds,” page 32, September issue), the panelists discuss key principles in treating open fracture wounds in the forefoot and toes. They also share their thoughts on the use of plastic surgery techniques and advanced wound closure modalities. Without further delay, here is what the panelists had to say.    Q: How do you manage simple open fracture wounds in the forefoot/toes?    A: A. Douglas Spital... continue reading
    The clinician can palpate more superior and medial to evaluate entrapment of the medial calcaneal nerve(s). Often, a patient with recalcitrant heel pain will have more tenderness at this site than at the medial calcaneal tubercle.
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, MBA
    68,131 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    This preoperative X-ray shows a rocker bottom deformity with chronic ulceration on the plantar lateral aspect.
    By John Giurini, DPM
    23,217 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       When Jean-Marie Charcot described the entity that bears his name in 1868, little did he know the controversies he would create. Charcot joint disease (or Charcot neuroarthropathy) has been one of the most misdiagnosed conditions in patients with diabetes mellitus. Patients with this entity have been misdiagnosed and consequently mistreated for osteomyelitis, cellulitis, tendonitis and gout.    Over the years, various controversial questions have been posed about the treatment of Charcot neuroarthropathy. These questions range from what type of diagnostic tes... continue reading
    As per his “twisted plate” model of the human foot, Sarrafian also showed the plate becomes “untwisted” and the arch lowers when the forefoot is inverted by applying a medial (varus) forefoot wedge, according to the author.
    By Douglas H. Richie, Jr., DPM
    32,198 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Heel pain is the most common musculoskeletal complaint of patients presenting to the podiatric physician. While heel pain is estimated to comprise 10 percent of athletic injuries, the incidence of heel pain in the active and sedentary population appears to be significantly underreported in the medical literature. Most experienced practitioners report that heel pain complaints have risen to epidemic proportion over the past 20 years for reasons we still do not fully understand.    Certainly, changing demographics figures into the equation. The average patient... continue reading
    By Lara M. Allman, DPM
    6,366 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       The year was 1996. I had finally graduated podiatry school. It felt great except for the large sum of loans that had accumulated. Four years and $100,000-plus in debt, it seemed like a black hole with no end in sight. A few months before graduation, the student loan department gave each of us a crash course on our loans, teaching us terms such as deferment, consolidation and prime rate. Deferment sounded good, especially if the residency salary left much to be desired. ... continue reading