Volume 18 - Issue 11 - November 2005

Continuing Education »

How To Evaluate And Treat Calcaneal Fractures

By Don Buddecke, DPM and Michael S. Lee, DPM | 38142 reads | 0 comments

   Calcaneal fractures continue to be one of the most complicated injuries of the lower extremity. Satisfactory outcomes are difficult to achieve and require extensive experience and understanding in treating the injury. Calcaneal fractures are much like pilon fractures of the distal tibia in that they are severe soft tissue injuries complicated by fracture of the heel bone. The importance of the soft tissue envelope cannot be overstated.

   There continues to be a wide range of treatment strategies despite the significant ongoing research on this injury. Cast



Editor's Perspective »

A Closer Look At Treating Plantar Fasciitis

By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor | 4904 reads | 0 comments

   There is no doubt that podiatrists see quite a bit of heel pain. Plantar fasciitis accounts for 11 to 15 percent of all foot symptoms in adults, according to an article published in the New England Journal of Medicine last year. As Stephen Barrett, DPM, points out in his cover story, “A Guide To Neurogenic Etiologies” (see page 36), projected estimates indicate that greater than two million patients per year are diagnosed with heel pain in the United States.

   However, despite the prevalence of this condition, there are complex anatomical consid



Technology In Practice »

A Closer Look At A Versatile Cryotherapy Solution For Pain

By Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor | 6384 reads | 0 comments

   Doctors are turning to Biofreeze to manage the pain associated with a variety of ailments affecting the lower extremities. Available in a gel, roll-on or no-touch natural Cryospray™, the product provides a pain relief period that generally lasts 30 percent longer than conventional gels, according to its manufacturer, Performance Health, Inc.

   Biofreeze works through cryotherapy. In essence, it decreases blood flow and confuses nerve endings. This in turn numbs the affected area and results in a decrease in inflammation. The formula contains Ilex, an he



Treatment Dilemmas »

When Second MPJ Overload Occurs Without Hammertoe Deformity

By Babak Baravarian, DPM | 39082 reads | 0 comments

   It is not uncommon to see one patient every day on my practice schedule who has pain and inflammation of the second metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ). While there are cases that involve a hammertoe associated with metatarsophalangeal joint pain, what are the options for treating patients who have pain in the second metatarsophalangeal joint but do not have a hammertoe deformity?

   When it comes to cases of so-called “capsulitis of the second MPJ,” we try all kinds of different therapy with little consideration of a proper diagnosis and diagnostic testing.



Wound Care Q&A »

How To Manage Traumatic Wounds Successfully

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 20418 reads | 0 comments

   In a follow-up column to the previous discussion of lower extremity traumatic wounds (see “Essential Insights On Managing Traumatic Wounds,” page 32, September issue), the panelists discuss key principles in treating open fracture wounds in the forefoot and toes. They also share their thoughts on the use of plastic surgery techniques and advanced wound closure modalities. Without further delay, here is what the panelists had to say.

   Q: How do you manage simple open fracture wounds in the forefoot/toes?

   A: A. Douglas Spital



Feature »

A Guide To Neurogenic Etiologies Of Heel Pain

By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, MBA | 59842 reads | 0 comments

   While heel pain is the most common condition podiatrists see in practice, heel pain can often be complex and occasionally difficult to treat.1 In recent years, we have seen the introduction of new treatments as logical conservative preludes to fasciotomy, including extracorporeal shockwave therapy, injection of the plantar fascia with autologous growth factors and coblation therapy.2

   Clinicians are able to employ some of these modalities, such as autologous growth factors, due to a better understanding of the true histological and ph



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