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  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • October 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 10
    By Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor
    10,981 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/05
       There is an array of foot creams on the market to treat patients with diabetes and neuropathy, some of which work better than others. HealthiBetic Foot Cream is one product that appears to be successful in reducing symptoms in patients, according to podiatrists who have prescribed the medication.    HealthiBetic’s patented Transdermal L-Arginine cream, which was developed specifically for people with diabetes, increases foot temperature 5º to 8ºF and improves blood flow 33 to 35 percent, states the cream’s manufacturer, Strategic Science and Technologi ... continue reading
    By Ronald Sage, DPM
    24,609 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/05
       In spite of efforts to control diabetes and improve limb salvage rates, the number of diabetes-related amputations continues to rise in the United States. Over 80,000 amputations are performed each year, with approximately one-half being partial foot procedures and one-half being transtibial or higher amputations.1 By evaluating and identifying patients at risk for amputation, podiatrists may initiate simple, preventive interventions that can help lower these dismal statistics.    Patients with diabetes suffer from macrovascular and microvascular ... continue reading
    By Christopher Nester, BSc (Hons), PhD, Andrew Findlow, BSc (Hons), Anmin Liu, BSc (Hons), Erin Ward, DPM, and Jay Cocheba, DPM
    24,297 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/05
       When it comes to the load-bearing joints of the lower limb, the foot is the least understood. This stems from the fact that its size is a major barrier to quality scientific investigation but is also partly due to the the misconception that its function is simple. While we may believe we know a great deal about the biomechanics of the foot and ankle, in reality, it is relatively uncharted territory compared to the knee and hip.    The foot is far from simple as it comprises hundreds of different ligaments and bony structures and scores of articulations. Its ... continue reading