Volume 18 - Issue 10 - October 2005

Continuing Education »

How To Diagnose Lateral Ankle Injuries

By Remy Ardizzone, DPM, and Ronald L. Valmassy, DPM | 80569 reads | 0 comments

   The initial presentation of an acute lateral ankle injury may be deceptive. What appears to be a simple ankle sprain may represent a fracture of the ankle or hindfoot. A tendon or impingement-type injury may not present until later in the healing process. One may not be able to appreciate other intraarticular injuries without advanced imaging studies. Nerve injuries may offer the greatest diagnostic challenges of all (see “A Guide To Differential Diagnosis Of Inversion Ankle Injuries” below).

   The ankle is the most common joint injured in sports and an



News and Trends »

International Olympic Committee Seeks DPM's Advice For 2008 Olympics

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 3333 reads | 0 comments

   Officials of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) are already in the midst of planning for the 2008 Olympics in Beijing. In order to facilitate improved treatment for athletic injuries, they recently sought out the suggestions of a United States podiatrist who treated athletes at the Athens Olympiad last year. Nicholas Romansky, DPM, who headed up the U.S. podiatry contingent at the 2004 Olympics, spoke recently to the IOC regarding his clinical experiences and made suggestions for the next games.

   Dr. Romansky reviewed injury trends, noted how the c



Feature »

Key Insights On Recommending Running Shoes

By Peter Wilusz, DPM | 21221 reads | 0 comments

   Believe it or not, the running shoe first originated as a leather upper with a leather sole. Adidas running shoes date back to the late 1800s but many of the technical advancements did not begin to appear until the 1970s. In 1971, Bill Bowerman and Phil Knight created a shoe manufacturing company called Blue Ribbon Sports (BRS), which eventually became Nike, Inc.

   While he was coaching track and field at the University of Oregon, Bowerman created the first cushioned midsole by heating polyurethane on his wife’s waffle iron in his garage. What followed wa



Feature »

Point-Counterpoint: Is Fusion The Best Option For Crossover Toe Deformity?

By William D. Fishco, DPM, and Lawrence Ford, DPM | 24016 reads | 0 comments

Yes, this author says surgeons can successfully incorporate arthrodesis in the repair of this deformity. He says a strong knowledge of the second toe anatomy and other influencing structures can facilitate good treatment outcomes.

By William D. Fishco, DPM

   In theory, surgery on the toes sounds pretty simple. After all, how hard can it be? Technically speaking, we consider toes to be “easy,” especially when we first start out in residency training. Most of us remember getting our first chance handling a scalpel while performing toe surgery. However, anyone who



Sports Medicine »

Secrets To Treating Lower Extremity Volleyball Injuries

By Mark A. Caselli, DPM | 24423 reads | 0 comments

   Volleyball is the world’s most popular participation sport. The Federation Internationale de Volleyball (FIVB), volleyball’s international governing body, reports that over 800 million people worldwide play volleyball. Individuals of all ages and skill levels can enjoy the sport. Athletes in over 200 countries play volleyball and almost half of these countries compete at the international level.

   According to USA Volleyball, the national governing body for the sport in the United States, there were 34.1 million players in the U.S. in 1998.

 



Orthotics Q&A »

A Closer Look At Orthotic Technologies And Modifications

Guest Clinical Editor: Lawrence Huppin, DPM | 9058 reads | 0 comments

   The development of new materials and technologies has had an impact on orthotics and biomechanics. These expert panelists discuss the technologies they have found helpful. In particular, they assess the impact of pressure analysis and how it can influence the writing of effective orthotic prescriptions. They also discuss common orthotic modifications and which orthotic materials they use in their practices.

   Q: How have new materials and technology changed the state of podiatric biomechanics and orthotic therapy?

   A: Russell Vol



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