Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • October 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 10
    By William D. Fishco, DPM, and Lawrence Ford, DPM
    26,183 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Yes, this author says surgeons can successfully incorporate arthrodesis in the repair of this deformity. He says a strong knowledge of the second toe anatomy and other influencing structures can facilitate good treatment outcomes. By William D. Fishco, DPM    In theory, surgery on the toes sounds pretty simple. After all, how hard can it be? Technically speaking, we consider toes to be “easy,” especially when we first start out in residency training. Most of us remember getting our first chance handling a scalpel while performing toe surgery. However, anyone who... continue reading
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM
    27,682 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Volleyball is the world’s most popular participation sport. The Federation Internationale de Volleyball (FIVB), volleyball’s international governing body, reports that over 800 million people worldwide play volleyball. Individuals of all ages and skill levels can enjoy the sport. Athletes in over 200 countries play volleyball and almost half of these countries compete at the international level.    According to USA Volleyball, the national governing body for the sport in the United States, there were 34.1 million players in the U.S. in 1998.  ... continue reading
    It is generally recognized in the medical community that podiatrists are unsurpassed at providing lower extremity care for the diabetic population. Shoes play a very important role in the management of these patients, according to the author.
    By Douglas Stoker, DPM
    22,046 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       One of the first patients I saw when I started practice many years ago was a diabetic patient who presented with medial ulcerations on both great toes. I aggressively treated the ulcerations and offloaded the toes. After the lesions had healed, I triumphantly told the patient she could go back to wearing her regular shoes.    Two weeks later, she returned to the office with the ulcers back in full bloom. As I should have done earlier, I had a discussion with the patient about shoes and found out she was wearing the same shoes she had worn for many years and ... continue reading
    Lawrence Huppin, DPM, says the reverse Morton’s extension (as seen above) is the most common orthotic modification he uses in practice.
    Guest Clinical Editor: Lawrence Huppin, DPM
    10,021 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       The development of new materials and technologies has had an impact on orthotics and biomechanics. These expert panelists discuss the technologies they have found helpful. In particular, they assess the impact of pressure analysis and how it can influence the writing of effective orthotic prescriptions. They also discuss common orthotic modifications and which orthotic materials they use in their practices.    Q: How have new materials and technology changed the state of podiatric biomechanics and orthotic therapy?    A: Russell Vol... continue reading

    6,164 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Protecting Diabetic Feet    Patients with diabetes now have two new options when it comes to protective footwear.    The T1230 and T1220 are the latest additions to the Ambulator Stretcher footwear series manufactured by Aetrex Worldwide. The shoes provide comfort and protection for patients who are diabetic or arthritic, and the shoes can accommodate a variety of foot injuries or conditions, according to the company.    Aetrex says the shoes feature high toe boxes, seamless spandex uppers and a removable depth of a half inch. The c... continue reading
    By Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor
    10,568 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       There is an array of foot creams on the market to treat patients with diabetes and neuropathy, some of which work better than others. HealthiBetic Foot Cream is one product that appears to be successful in reducing symptoms in patients, according to podiatrists who have prescribed the medication.    HealthiBetic’s patented Transdermal L-Arginine cream, which was developed specifically for people with diabetes, increases foot temperature 5º to 8ºF and improves blood flow 33 to 35 percent, states the cream’s manufacturer, Strategic Science and Technologi... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    2,704 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       I entered a room in the bowels of the hospital marked “administrative conference room.” It was 7 a.m. on a Friday. I usually have a cup of coffee and read a book at that hour. There was a coffee pot and some bagels but the reading material was patient charts stacked at one end of the table.    All physicians are invited to participate in chart review but it is a tedious and often unpleasant task generally known as peer review. Three of us showed up on this day. One was a young OB-GYN who has been with us for a year. One was a urologist who has been here ... continue reading
    This chart shows the motion of the talus relative to the tibia during simulated walking cadaver experiments. Positive angles are plantarflexion, inversion and adduction. Data (frames) is for stance phase between heel strike and just prior to toe off.
    By Christopher Nester, BSc (Hons), PhD, Andrew Findlow, BSc (Hons), Anmin Liu, BSc (Hons), Erin Ward, DPM, and Jay Cocheba, DPM
    23,985 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       When it comes to the load-bearing joints of the lower limb, the foot is the least understood. This stems from the fact that its size is a major barrier to quality scientific investigation but is also partly due to the the misconception that its function is simple. While we may believe we know a great deal about the biomechanics of the foot and ankle, in reality, it is relatively uncharted territory compared to the knee and hip.    The foot is far from simple as it comprises hundreds of different ligaments and bony structures and scores of articulations. Its ... continue reading
    By Ronald Sage, DPM
    24,220 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       In spite of efforts to control diabetes and improve limb salvage rates, the number of diabetes-related amputations continues to rise in the United States. Over 80,000 amputations are performed each year, with approximately one-half being partial foot procedures and one-half being transtibial or higher amputations.1 By evaluating and identifying patients at risk for amputation, podiatrists may initiate simple, preventive interventions that can help lower these dismal statistics.    Patients with diabetes suffer from macrovascular and microvascular ... continue reading
    Gerard V. Yu, DPM
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    3,299 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
       As we were putting last month’s issue to bed, we received the stunningly sad news about the sudden passing of Gerard V. Yu, DPM, due to a heart attack. A leading educator and ambassador for the podiatry profession, Dr. Yu was an active member of our Editorial Advisory Board for the past three years. Dr. Yu was a dynamic presence whose generous spirit, good humor and compassion will leave a lasting legacy.     “Surgical successes and unraveling clinical complications have always been things that I attribute to having trained and worked with (Dr. Yu),”... continue reading