Volume 18 - Issue 9 - September 2005

Continuing Education »

A Guide To Offloading The Diabetic Foot

By Nick Martin, DPM, Tim Oldani, DPM, and Matthew J. Claxton, DPM | 28084 reads | 0 comments

   Increased plantar foot pressure is a leading cause of ulceration in the diabetic population.1 Healing these ulcers requires adequate blood supply, control of infection, excellent wound care and offloading or pressure redistribution of the ulcerative area.2-16 Out of all these factors, offloading presents a particularly unique challenge in treating chronic wounds. As diabetic foot care has evolved over the years, podiatrists have used numerous approaches including complete bed rest, cutout felt pads and total contact casting to offload these wounds.3



Editor's Perspective »

Is Sports Medicine Getting Short Shrift At The Schools?

By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor | 1967 reads | 0 comments

   Sports medicine reportedly drives a large number of folks to study podiatric medicine. However, it does not appear to be much of a priority at the majority of the podiatry schools. Only two schools offer a semester course in sports medicine in the third year. Virtually no residency program devotes significant time to sports medicine, according to one prominent podiatrist with an active sports medicine practice.

   A professor at one of the colleges bluntly sums up her school’s commitment to sports medicine: “We truck in an expert every couple of years t



Diabetes Watch »

Combining VAC Therapy With Advanced Modalities: Can It Expedite Healing?

By Stephanie C. Wu, DPM, MS, Hong Yoon, MS, and David G. Armstrong, DPM, MSc, PhD | 33606 reads | 0 comments

   Skin ulceration of the lower extremity affects millions of people in the United States alone and may be secondary to a myriad of etiologies including pressure, metabolic, trauma, venous, arterial and diabetic neuropathy.1 The medical, psychosocial and financial impacts imposed by lower extremity ulcerations are tremendous. The attributable cost for the treatment of chronic lower extremity ulcerations has been estimated to be as high as $3.6 billion dollars per year.2 Medicare expenditures for lower extremity ulcer patients were, on average, three times h



Forum »

Ensure A Bright Retirement: Why It Pays To Be Proactive

By John H. McCord, DPM | 2816 reads | 0 comments

   As a fourth-year podiatry student in 1974, I decided to start my practice debt-free. As a student, I heard horror stories about young DPMs going $60,000 into debt to open their first office. In 1974, $60,000 would give you a posh office with state-of-the-art equipment and plenty extra to live on before the revenue started pouring in.

   I heard stories about young podiatrists who ended up falling behind and losing everything before they completed the first year. Our current graduates are now toughened by the overwhelming burden of six-figure student loans an



News and Trends »

College Offers Accelerated DO Program For DPMs

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 11642 reads | 0 comments

   Adding a new twist to the ongoing debate about dual degrees for podiatrists, the Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine (NSU-COM) recently announced that two podiatrists have enrolled in the college’s new, accelerated doctor of osteopathic medicine (DO) program. College officials say the program is the first of its kind developed specifically for DPMs.

   The program was formulated in association with the American Board of Podiatric Orthopedics and Primary Podiatric Medicine, according to Leonard A. Levy, DPM, MPH, an Associate Dean f



Surgical Pearls »

When Is It Appropriate For Arthrodiastasis Of The First MPJ?

By Peter M. Wilusz, DPM, and Guy R. Pupp, DPM | 15485 reads | 0 comments

   Multiple etiologies exist for painful conditions that involve the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ). Hallux abducto valgus and hallux limitus are the most common pathologies of the first MPJ podiatrists see in most foot and ankle clinics. Other causes may include rheumatoid arthritis, trauma, connective tissue disorders, infection, iatrogenic and metabolic disorders. Historically, treatment has been geared to realigning structural abnormalities of bone as they affect the joint.1

   Unfortunately, very little literature discusses specific treat