Volume 18 - Issue 9 - September 2005

Forum »

Ensure A Bright Retirement: Why It Pays To Be Proactive

By John H. McCord, DPM | 2751 reads | 0 comments

   As a fourth-year podiatry student in 1974, I decided to start my practice debt-free. As a student, I heard horror stories about young DPMs going $60,000 into debt to open their first office. In 1974, $60,000 would give you a posh office with state-of-the-art equipment and plenty extra to live on before the revenue started pouring in.

   I heard stories about young podiatrists who ended up falling behind and losing everything before they completed the first year. Our current graduates are now toughened by the overwhelming burden of six-figure student loans an



News and Trends »

College Offers Accelerated DO Program For DPMs

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 11246 reads | 0 comments

   Adding a new twist to the ongoing debate about dual degrees for podiatrists, the Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine (NSU-COM) recently announced that two podiatrists have enrolled in the college’s new, accelerated doctor of osteopathic medicine (DO) program. College officials say the program is the first of its kind developed specifically for DPMs.

   The program was formulated in association with the American Board of Podiatric Orthopedics and Primary Podiatric Medicine, according to Leonard A. Levy, DPM, MPH, an Associate Dean f



Surgical Pearls »

When Is It Appropriate For Arthrodiastasis Of The First MPJ?

By Peter M. Wilusz, DPM, and Guy R. Pupp, DPM | 15022 reads | 0 comments

   Multiple etiologies exist for painful conditions that involve the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ). Hallux abducto valgus and hallux limitus are the most common pathologies of the first MPJ podiatrists see in most foot and ankle clinics. Other causes may include rheumatoid arthritis, trauma, connective tissue disorders, infection, iatrogenic and metabolic disorders. Historically, treatment has been geared to realigning structural abnormalities of bone as they affect the joint.1

   Unfortunately, very little literature discusses specific treat



Technology In Practice »

Will Infrared Technology Render Plaster Casting Obsolete?

By Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor | 5573 reads | 0 comments

   Considering the prevalence of orthotic therapy in podiatric care today, it only seemed like a matter of time before a technologically advanced option arrived on the scene. With the introduction of the PedAlign system, podiatrists may have an alternative to the traditional time-consuming and often messy method of plaster casting.

   The PedAlign technology employs an infrared optical scanning device that quickly captures and digitizes a foot’s image. This image, along with a doctor’s prescription, is electronically transmitted to a laborator



Wound Care Q&A »

Essential Insights On Managing Traumatic Wounds

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 9950 reads | 0 comments

   Traumatic injuries in the lower extremity can be particularly difficult to manage and treat. Not only is it difficult to assess the degree of the damage caused by these injuries, prompt evaluation and treatment is essential given the risks of infection and amputation. With that said, our expert panelists review their treatment protocols.

   Q: What are the basic guidelines/philosophies in treating lower extremity traumatic wounds?

   A: Jordan Grossman, DPM, emphasizes precise evaluation of the clinical and radiographic presentation.



Treatment Dilemmas »

How To Address Osteochondral Lesions

By Justin Franson, DPM, and Babak Baravarian, DPM | 45060 reads | 0 comments

   An athletic, 35 year-old male presents to the office four months after suffering an ankle sprain while playing soccer. In spite of a period of immobilization and a course of physical therapy, he has had continued pain and stiffness localized to the ankle joint. He has been wearing a lace-up ankle brace, icing the ankle and taking OTC NSAIDs.

   A physical examination reveals mild tenderness upon palpation to the ankle joint line but there is no significant pain along the medial or lateral collateral ligaments. He has a negative anterior drawer. Routine X-ra