Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • September 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 9
    By Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor
    5,873 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/05
       Considering the prevalence of orthotic therapy in podiatric care today, it only seemed like a matter of time before a technologically advanced option arrived on the scene. With the introduction of the PedAlign™ system, podiatrists may have an alternative to the traditional time-consuming and often messy method of plaster casting.    The PedAlign technology employs an infrared optical scanning device that quickly captures and digitizes a foot’s image. This image, along with a doctor’s prescription, is electronically transmitted to a laborator ... continue reading
    By Martin C. Yorath, DPM
    10,387 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/05
         In recent years, there has been more of an emphasis upon podiatrists performing their own history and physical examinations (H&Ps) for the purposes of hospital admission. This was spurred on to a large degree by the pivotal ruling by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) in 2000 and the new residency models required by the Council on Podiatric Medical Education (CPME), which now require a minimum number of history and physical examinations during the residency training period.1,2 Most training programs will certainly exceed thi ... continue reading
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    11,143 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/05
       Traumatic injuries in the lower extremity can be particularly difficult to manage and treat. Not only is it difficult to assess the degree of the damage caused by these injuries, prompt evaluation and treatment is essential given the risks of infection and amputation. With that said, our expert panelists review their treatment protocols.    Q: What are the basic guidelines/philosophies in treating lower extremity traumatic wounds?    A: Jordan Grossman, DPM, emphasizes precise evaluation of the clinical and radiographic presentation. ... continue reading
    By Justin Franson, DPM, and Babak Baravarian, DPM
    49,865 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/05
       An athletic, 35 year-old male presents to the office four months after suffering an ankle sprain while playing soccer. In spite of a period of immobilization and a course of physical therapy, he has had continued pain and stiffness localized to the ankle joint. He has been wearing a lace-up ankle brace, icing the ankle and taking OTC NSAIDs.    A physical examination reveals mild tenderness upon palpation to the ankle joint line but there is no significant pain along the medial or lateral collateral ligaments. He has a negative anterior drawer. Routine X-ra ... continue reading
    By Anthony Poggio, DPM
    57,601 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/05
       Getting a denial for claims is, at best, upsetting for both the doctor and staff. Often, the doctor sees this in a negative light. If the dollar amount in question is small, he or she may totally disregard it, believing it is “not worth it” to appeal. When repeated problems involving specific CPT or ICD-9 codes occur, DPMs sometimes select alternative coding choices, which may not be the best option either.    Instead of looking at a claim denial as a defeat, try to look at it as an educational opportunity. Unless one understands the reason for the deni ... continue reading
    By Stephanie C. Wu, DPM, MS, Hong Yoon, MS, and David G. Armstrong, DPM, MSc, PhD
    34,201 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/05
       Skin ulceration of the lower extremity affects millions of people in the United States alone and may be secondary to a myriad of etiologies including pressure, metabolic, trauma, venous, arterial and diabetic neuropathy.1 The medical, psychosocial and financial impacts imposed by lower extremity ulcerations are tremendous. The attributable cost for the treatment of chronic lower extremity ulcerations has been estimated to be as high as $3.6 billion dollars per year.2 Medicare expenditures for lower extremity ulcer patients were, on average, three times h ... continue reading
    By Nick Martin, DPM, Tim Oldani, DPM, and Matthew J. Claxton, DPM
    29,198 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/05
       Increased plantar foot pressure is a leading cause of ulceration in the diabetic population.1 Healing these ulcers requires adequate blood supply, control of infection, excellent wound care and offloading or pressure redistribution of the ulcerative area.2-16 Out of all these factors, offloading presents a particularly unique challenge in treating chronic wounds. As diabetic foot care has evolved over the years, podiatrists have used numerous approaches including complete bed rest, cutout felt pads and total contact casting to offload these wounds.3 ... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    2,953 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/05
       As a fourth-year podiatry student in 1974, I decided to start my practice debt-free. As a student, I heard horror stories about young DPMs going $60,000 into debt to open their first office. In 1974, $60,000 would give you a posh office with state-of-the-art equipment and plenty extra to live on before the revenue started pouring in.    I heard stories about young podiatrists who ended up falling behind and losing everything before they completed the first year. Our current graduates are now toughened by the overwhelming burden of six-figure student loans an ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    2,039 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/05
       Sports medicine reportedly drives a large number of folks to study podiatric medicine. However, it does not appear to be much of a priority at the majority of the podiatry schools. Only two schools offer a semester course in sports medicine in the third year. Virtually no residency program devotes significant time to sports medicine, according to one prominent podiatrist with an active sports medicine practice.    A professor at one of the colleges bluntly sums up her school’s commitment to sports medicine: “We truck in an expert every couple of years t ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    12,137 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/05
       Adding a new twist to the ongoing debate about dual degrees for podiatrists, the Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine (NSU-COM) recently announced that two podiatrists have enrolled in the college’s new, accelerated doctor of osteopathic medicine (DO) program. College officials say the program is the first of its kind developed specifically for DPMs.    The program was formulated in association with the American Board of Podiatric Orthopedics and Primary Podiatric Medicine, according to Leonard A. Levy, DPM, MPH, an Associate Dean f ... continue reading