Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • July 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 7
    Here is a view of the ankle with arthritic changes of multiple joints. Such a presentation is typical of early rheumatoid changes.
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    10,651 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Forefoot issues related to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are well noted with fusion of the great toe being a standard procedure in association with relocation or resection of the lesser metatarsophalangeal joints, and fusion of the proximal interphalangeal joints. Surgeons have also been successful in treating the rearfoot with fusion procedures once the arthritis is not tolerable with bracing and medication.    As a patient grows older, it is easier to address the issues of RA in the ankle. In the thin and fairly sedentary patient, ankle replacement is a good ... continue reading
    Here is an example of a MRSA infection with accompanying cellulitis. (Photo courtesy of Lawrence Karlock, DPM)
    By Jason R. Hanft, DPM, and Brigette Smith, DPM
    47,566 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Since every wound has the potential for infection, it is important to differentiate between infection and colonization.1 There is no textbook that depicts all the possible appearances of wounds that contain bacteria. Indeed, the potential of wounds to heal or become infected depends on many variables. Wound care specialists have a responsibility to become familiar with the these variables as well as develop a trained eye for the clinical appearance of a wound so they may render the appropriate treatment.    There is an enormous amount of informat... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    3,822 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       This is the time of my professional life when I planned to slow down with fewer clinic hours, less surgery and maybe a few more nursing home visits. It has not worked out that way. Three years ago, I hired an associate who had just completed a quality PSR-24 in a university hospital. The place was an advanced trauma center with a lot of emergency room activity to stimulate young podiatric residents.    He asked about my referral experience from our local emergency room. I received a handful of referrals and consults over the years, and just accepted that tr... continue reading
    By Kristin Titko, DPM
    7,665 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       In the competitive world of medicine, half of the battle for the specialists today is establishing a positive relationship with a primary care physician. It can be initially intimidating to some podiatrists to compete against more established orthopedic foot and ankle specialists in their area. However, if the primary care physician is aware of a DPM’s scope of practice, abilities, strengths, successes and knowledge of limitations, he or she can help the podiatric practice thrive in the local community. ... continue reading