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  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • July 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 7
    Here you can see a typical neuropathic forefoot ulcer before tendon lengthening (gastrocnemius-soleus and posterior tibial).
    By J. Monroe Laborde, MD, MS
    18,239 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The above X-ray of the right ankle of a 10-year-old boy shows lucency in the tibial metaphysis secondary to acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHO).
    By Michael Schreck, DPM
    26,461 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Although both acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHO) and chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) are somewhat uncommon, differentiating between the two can be tricky. Having a strong grasp of the etiology and presentation of these conditions can go a long way toward preventing a delayed or inappropriate diagnosis, which could be harmful for pediatric patients.    Pediatric hematogenous osteomyelitis may occur secondary to a traumatic injury and/or an acquired illness or other immunosuppressive condition. Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis reportedly ... continue reading
    Here is a view of the ankle with arthritic changes of multiple joints. Such a presentation is typical of early rheumatoid changes.
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    10,349 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Forefoot issues related to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are well noted with fusion of the great toe being a standard procedure in association with relocation or resection of the lesser metatarsophalangeal joints, and fusion of the proximal interphalangeal joints. Surgeons have also been successful in treating the rearfoot with fusion procedures once the arthritis is not tolerable with bracing and medication.    As a patient grows older, it is easier to address the issues of RA in the ankle. In the thin and fairly sedentary patient, ankle replacement is a good ... continue reading
    Here is an example of a MRSA infection with accompanying cellulitis. (Photo courtesy of Lawrence Karlock, DPM)
    By Jason R. Hanft, DPM, and Brigette Smith, DPM
    46,325 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Since every wound has the potential for infection, it is important to differentiate between infection and colonization.1 There is no textbook that depicts all the possible appearances of wounds that contain bacteria. Indeed, the potential of wounds to heal or become infected depends on many variables. Wound care specialists have a responsibility to become familiar with the these variables as well as develop a trained eye for the clinical appearance of a wound so they may render the appropriate treatment.    There is an enormous amount of informat... continue reading