Volume 18 - Issue 7 - July 2005

Continuing Education »

How To Differentiate Between Infected Wounds And Colonized Wounds

By Jason R. Hanft, DPM, and Brigette Smith, DPM | 42834 reads | 0 comments

   Since every wound has the potential for infection, it is important to differentiate between infection and colonization.1 There is no textbook that depicts all the possible appearances of wounds that contain bacteria. Indeed, the potential of wounds to heal or become infected depends on many variables. Wound care specialists have a responsibility to become familiar with the these variables as well as develop a trained eye for the clinical appearance of a wound so they may render the appropriate treatment.

   There is an enormous amount of informat



Feature »

Building Referrals And Relationships With Primary Care Providers

By Kristin Titko, DPM | 6171 reads | 0 comments

   In the competitive world of medicine, half of the battle for the specialists today is establishing a positive relationship with a primary care physician. It can be initially intimidating to some podiatrists to compete against more established orthopedic foot and ankle specialists in their area. However, if the primary care physician is aware of a DPM’s scope of practice, abilities, strengths, successes and knowledge of limitations, he or she can help the podiatric practice thrive in the local community.



Editor's Perspective »

Taking A Proactive, Long-Term View To Preventive Medicine

By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor | 1578 reads | 0 comments

   In a recent position statement, “Third-Party Reimbursement For Diabetes Care, Self-Management Education and Supplies,” the American Diabetes Association (ADA) doesn’t exactly mince words. “To reach diabetes treatment goals, practitioners should have access to all classes of antidiabetic medications, equipment and supplies without undue controls. Without appropriate safeguards, these controls could constitute an obstruction of effective care.”

   What about patients who do not have pain or cannot feel pain due to neuropathy? One of the often-cited s



Feature »

Conquering Plastic Surgery Complications In Wound Care

By Tod Storm, DPM | 20514 reads | 0 comments

   The use of plastic surgery techniques has increased dramatically among podiatric surgeons over the past few years. The most useful techniques involve the use of skin grafts and local flaps, which can help solve some difficult wound closure problems. The increased usage of these techniques is partially due to the fact that some are relatively easy to learn and one can learn the basics at weekend workshops. However, as one might expect with any surgical procedure, complications can arise.

   Fortunately, severe complications are infrequent but one must handle



Feature »

A Closer Look At Diabetic Foot Infections

By Warren S. Joseph, DPM, Thomas Zgonis, DPM, and Thomas S. Roukis, DPM | 39085 reads | 0 comments

   Diabetic foot infections arising from ulcerations are the largest non-traumatic cause of lower extremity amputations. Contributing factors include peripheral neuropathy and vascular disease, rigid pedal deformities, local trauma and pressure, extensive soft tissue loss, multi-system failure, non-compliance and severe infection.

   Over the decades, there have been a number of shifts in the way clinicians approach diabetic foot infections (DFIs). Throughout the ‘60s and into the ‘70s, clinicians felt most DFIs were, like other skin and skin structure inf



Diabetes Watch »

Tendon Lengthening: Is It A Viable Option For Forefoot Ulcers?

By J. Monroe Laborde, MD, MS | 16847 reads | 0 comments

   Approximately 3 percent of the United States population has diagnosed diabetes mellitus.1 Diabetic foot problems, however, are the leading cause of amputation.2,3 The risk of amputation is 15 times greater in patients with diabetes than in other people.2 Up to 15 percent of patients with diabetes will require amputation.1,3 Over 50,000 amputations in patients with diabetes occur annually in the U.S.4 In one study of patients with diabetes mellitus, 84 percent of lower extremity amputations were preceded by foot ulcers.