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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • July 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 7
    Here one can see cellulitis on a patient’s right foot with localized signs of infection. Early aggressive surgical debridement is crucial to avoid subsequent proximal amputations.
    By Warren S. Joseph, DPM, Thomas Zgonis, DPM, and Thomas S. Roukis, DPM
    42,309 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Diabetic foot infections arising from ulcerations are the largest non-traumatic cause of lower extremity amputations. Contributing factors include peripheral neuropathy and vascular disease, rigid pedal deformities, local trauma and pressure, extensive soft tissue loss, multi-system failure, non-compliance and severe infection.    Over the decades, there have been a number of shifts in the way clinicians approach diabetic foot infections (DFIs). Throughout the ‘60s and into the ‘70s, clinicians felt most DFIs were, like other skin and skin structure inf... continue reading
    By Peter A. Blume, DPM, Kenneth L. Cornell, DPM, Bauer Sumpio, MD, and John Aruny, MD; and Mardon R. Day, DPM
    9,507 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Yes, these panelists say ischemia plays a significant role in chronic ulcerations and emphasize the importance of a thorough vascular workup in these patients. By Peter A. Blume, DPM, Kenneth L. Cornell, DPM, Bauer Sumpio, MD, and John Aruny, MD    Clinicians must consider numerous factors when evaluating and treating ulcerations of the foot. Ulceration in the foot most frequently occurs as a result of a combination of neuropathy, ischemia and trauma. Ulcerations that become chronic in nature frequently result in a lower extremity that is at an i... continue reading
    Here you can see a typical neuropathic forefoot ulcer before tendon lengthening (gastrocnemius-soleus and posterior tibial).
    By J. Monroe Laborde, MD, MS
    18,472 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The above X-ray of the right ankle of a 10-year-old boy shows lucency in the tibial metaphysis secondary to acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHO).
    By Michael Schreck, DPM
    26,702 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Although both acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHO) and chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) are somewhat uncommon, differentiating between the two can be tricky. Having a strong grasp of the etiology and presentation of these conditions can go a long way toward preventing a delayed or inappropriate diagnosis, which could be harmful for pediatric patients.    Pediatric hematogenous osteomyelitis may occur secondary to a traumatic injury and/or an acquired illness or other immunosuppressive condition. Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis reportedly ... continue reading