Volume 18 - Issue 7 - July 2005

News and Trends »

PRESENT Facilitates International Exchange Of Education And Experience

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 7442 reads | 0 comments

   Podology in Spain has evolved from a subspecialty of nursing into its own undergrad degree. As a result, Juan Goez, DPM, says the profession is undergoing the same “growing pains” that American podiatry suffered in the 1960s and ‘70s. As the profession grows, PRESENT (Podiatric Residency Education Services Network) Courseware, an online provider of lecture content to U.S. podiatric residency programs, is expanding its series of lectures into Spain to provide podologists with insights into the medical and surgical experience of American DPMs.

    “I



Surgical Pearls »

How To Manage Surgical Pain In Elderly Patients

By Erwin Juda, DPM, R.Ph. | 10493 reads | 0 comments

   Pain management in the elderly remains one of the most challenging issues for the podiatric surgeon. As life expectancy continues to advance, more geriatric patients will undergo surgery. While these patients may undergo these procedures to help facilitate independence and a better quality of life, one must carefully weigh the risks and benefits of surgical intervention in this patient population.

   Regardless of the success of the given surgical procedure, one may still encounter significant tissue damage and the subsequent release of pain and inflammator



Technology In Practice »

Managing Neuropathic Pain: Why Axsain Is A Viable Alternative

By Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor | 6182 reads | 0 comments

   For patients suffering from neuropathic pain, quality of life can be a real issue. Traditional over-the-counter remedies have often not been enough to combat the effects of diabetic neuropathy or postherpetic neuralgia. However, with the introduction of Axsain (capsaicin 0.25%), doctors now have a new weapon in their armamentarium to fight pain.

   Used alone or as an adjunctive therapy to supplement oral medications, Axsain contains three times as much capsaicin as other brands currently on the market. It works by depleting sensory nerves of t



Feature »

Point-Counterpoint: Is Ischemia A Direct Risk Factor For Ulceration?

By Peter A. Blume, DPM, Kenneth L. Cornell, DPM, Bauer Sumpio, MD, and John Aruny, MD; and Mardon R. Day, DPM | 8723 reads | 0 comments

   Yes, these panelists say ischemia plays a significant role in chronic ulcerations and emphasize the importance of a thorough vascular workup in these patients.

By Peter A. Blume, DPM, Kenneth L. Cornell, DPM, Bauer Sumpio, MD, and
John Aruny, MD

   Clinicians must consider numerous factors when evaluating and treating ulcerations of the foot. Ulceration in the foot most frequently occurs as a result of a combination of neuropathy, ischemia and trauma. Ulcerations that become chronic in nature frequently result in a lower extremity that is at an i



Feature »

How To Detect Pediatric Osteomyelitis

By Michael Schreck, DPM | 24247 reads | 0 comments

   Although both acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHO) and chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) are somewhat uncommon, differentiating between the two can be tricky. Having a strong grasp of the etiology and presentation of these conditions can go a long way toward preventing a delayed or inappropriate diagnosis, which could be harmful for pediatric patients.

   Pediatric hematogenous osteomyelitis may occur secondary to a traumatic injury and/or an acquired illness or other immunosuppressive condition. Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis reportedly



Continuing Education »

How To Differentiate Between Infected Wounds And Colonized Wounds

By Jason R. Hanft, DPM, and Brigette Smith, DPM | 42711 reads | 0 comments

   Since every wound has the potential for infection, it is important to differentiate between infection and colonization.1 There is no textbook that depicts all the possible appearances of wounds that contain bacteria. Indeed, the potential of wounds to heal or become infected depends on many variables. Wound care specialists have a responsibility to become familiar with the these variables as well as develop a trained eye for the clinical appearance of a wound so they may render the appropriate treatment.

   There is an enormous amount of informat



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