Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • June 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 6
    Orthotic modifications may be helpful in relieving symptoms of metatarsalgia. Here one can see a slot aperture for lesser metatarsalgia that can be extended to the end of the device in order to offload the affected metatarsal head that has been receiving
    Guest Clinical Editor: Bruce Williams, DPM
    32,000 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
       Metatarsalgia is one of the more commonly seen complaints in any podiatry practice. Common treatments for the disorder include ice, removable metatarsal pads, antiinflammatories, injected steroids and physical therapy. While such treatments often completely resolve an acute bout of metatarsalgia, they often do nothing to remedy the true underlying biomechanical causes of the problem.    To correct the faulty foot biomechanics, DPMs rely on custom foot orthotics. Unfortunately, the devices are often no different than what one prescribes for any other foot di... continue reading
    The author notes that joint replacement is his procedure of choice for treating lesser MPJ disorders. When the range of motion is acceptable, one can remove the sizer and place the properly sized implant into the proximal phalanx.
    By Vincent J. Muscarella, DPM
    16,286 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Podiatric physicians routinely see disorders of the forefoot, especially the lesser metatarsophalangeal joints (MPJs). In fact, they are often the presenting complaint of the patient or the reason for the medical referral. Lesser MPJ disorders can also occur as a result of preexisting conditions such as trauma, infection, faulty biomechanics and previous podiatric surgery.    Unfortunately, the term metatarsalgia has been used as a catch-all term to describe a condition without a true etiology. This can be very frustrating to both the patient and the doctor... continue reading
    Dr. Werber and his staff frequently use text messaging and instant messaging to communicate during office hours. Instead of putting a message on a pad, a staff member can immediately type it online and send it to the cell phone of the doctor.
    By Bruce Werber, DPM
    8,909 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       In these times of diminishing reimbursement, we must look at ways of decreasing the costs of our practices. Obviously, we cannot cut much from patient care costs and we have a limited ability to increase fees and income from our practices. In any business, there are ways to improve the net profit. One could implement extended hours to see more patients, minimize payroll costs by reducing staff or try to lower the cost of materials.    However, I recommend taking a closer look at technology and changing the standard workflow to improve efficiency and decreas... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    1,583 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Every June, we start thinking about next year. We actively seek out suggestions from our Editorial Advisory Board and other key contributors on the latest topics that would make for solid feature articles. We sit in on lectures during the Western Podiatric Medical Congress and subsequently approach the lecturers about converting their talks into future articles. It is all part of the process in developing the right editorial mix of innovative approaches and practical insights for both common conditions and other dilemmas one may see in practice.    Last year... continue reading