Volume 18 - Issue 6 - June 2005

Sports Medicine »

Secrets To Treating Martial Arts Injuries

By Mark A. Caselli, DPM, and Edward C. Rzonca, DPM | 24522 reads | 0 comments

   Martial arts, such as karate and tae kwon do, have become very popular in recent years for both adults and children. Karate and tae kwon do have been promoted as excellent activities for maintaining good health and fitness. People frequently perform these activities after school or work.

   Given that the foot and ankle account for at least 10 percent of the total injuries sustained in the martial arts — and may even be higher due to the lack of reporting of many digital injuries such as contusions, toenail trauma and uncomplicated fractures — most podia



Technology In Practice »

Accu-Cut System Facilitates Enhanced Precision

By Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor | 4865 reads | 0 comments

   When performing bunion surgery, DPMs may be seeking a device that can correct several angles and enhance the cuts of traditional bunionectomies. Now a tried-and-true osteotomy device comes complete with new equipment to make surgery simpler. The new instrumentation is designed to help practitioners correct intermetatarsal angles in addition to proximal articular set angle (PASA).

   Over a year ago, Biopro expanded its Accu-Cut Osteotomy Guide System with the introduction of the 2-Stage Guide for correction of PASA. The new system has a kit con



Feature »

Roundtable Insights On Adult-Acquired Flatfoot

Moderator: Robert Mendicino, DPM Panelists: Alan Catanzariti, DPM, Jordan Grossman, DPM, Michael S. Lee, DPM, Shannon Rush, DPM and Gerard V. Yu, DPM | 19674 reads | 0 comments

   Adult-acquired flatfoot (AAF) is one of the more common conditions that podiatrists see in practice. With this in mind, some of the leading experts on this subject shared their views and experience on this subject. They discuss the role of diagnostic imaging, their use of conservative treatments and their perspectives on appropriate surgical procedures. Without further delay, here is what they had to say.

   Q: What ancillary studies are required for proper diagnosis and treatment selection for the adult-acquired flatfoot?

   A: Mi



Feature »

Point-Counterpoint: Nerve Decompression In Diabetic Patients: Should It Be Done?

By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, Patrick DeHeer, DPM, and Stephen Offutt, DPM | 10468 reads | 0 comments

   Yes. This author discusses the etiology of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, cites reports of efficacy for peripheral nerve decompression in the literature and shares insights from his experience in performing the procedure.

By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM

   Mainstream medical education is still teaching that the symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy are progressive and irreversible. There is adequate and overwhelming basic and clinical medical science that contradicts this dogma.1-5 Indeed, one wonders how many additional outcome studies



Feature »

NSAIDs: Where Do We Go From Here?

By Anthony R. Iorio, DPM, MPH | 6937 reads | 0 comments

   Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most widely used medications today. Considering their well-documented efficacy in managing fever, mild to moderate pain and, at higher doses, inflammation, such widespread use is generally appropriate. In 1997, over 74 million NSAID prescriptions were dispensed in the United States, representing approximately 4.5 percent of all prescriptions. In addition, nonprescription NSAIDs such as aspirin and ibuprofen contribute significantly to the use of this class of medications. It is estimated that 1 to 2 percent of the Nor



Feature »

Current Concepts In Medial Column Hypermobility

By Neal M. Blitz, DPM | 33641 reads | 0 comments

   The impact of medial column hypermobility on foot function and deformity development has gained significant attention in the past few decades.1 It has been associated with pes planus, metatarsus primus adductus, hallux valgus, midfoot arthritis, metatarsalgia, plantar plate injury and lesser metatarsal stress fractures. Dudley Morton, an anatomist, introduced the concept of hypermobility.2 The so-called “Morton’s foot” includes hypermobility, equinus and a short first metatarsal.3

   While the existence of hypermobility