Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • June 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 6
    By Amy L. Duckworth, DPM
    13,308 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/05
       Complications related to obesity have been a topic of concern for health officials since the 1950s. However, it has only been in the past few years that a widespread epidemic has reached alarming proportions in the United States and worldwide, leading to substantial health and economic costs. In the U.S., obesity is largely linked to an increase in the incidence of type II diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome.    In fact, a recently published study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warns that “one-third of Americans born in 2000 c ... continue reading
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, Patrick DeHeer, DPM, and Stephen Offutt, DPM
    11,374 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/05
       Yes. This author discusses the etiology of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, cites reports of efficacy for peripheral nerve decompression in the literature and shares insights from his experience in performing the procedure. By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM    Mainstream medical education is still teaching that the symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy are progressive and irreversible. There is adequate and overwhelming basic and clinical medical science that contradicts this dogma.1-5 Indeed, one wonders how many additional outcome studies ... continue reading

    3,343 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/05
    A Lighter Step    Patients need to stay off their feet while recovering from various types of sprains and a new walker may let them do just that.    The StepLite® Easy Air™ Pneumatic-Gel Ankle Walker has a pneumatic gel “bladder” that contains multiple air and gel cells. These cells can be inflated and deflated to facilitate support and comfort, according to the manufacturer FLA Orthopedics.    The company notes the product is ideal for treating acute or severe ankle sprains, severe ankle or foot stra ... continue reading
    Since aspirin, ibuprofen, indomethacin, piroxicam and phenylbutazone are metabolized by multiple pathways, dosage adjustments are usually unnecesssary in patients with hepatic disease or in elderly patients with normal renal function.
    By Anthony R. Iorio, DPM, MPH
    7,838 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/05
       Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most widely used medications today. Considering their well-documented efficacy in managing fever, mild to moderate pain and, at higher doses, inflammation, such widespread use is generally appropriate. In 1997, over 74 million NSAID prescriptions were dispensed in the United States, representing approximately 4.5 percent of all prescriptions. In addition, nonprescription NSAIDs such as aspirin and ibuprofen contribute significantly to the use of this class of medications. It is estimated that 1 to 2 percent of the Nor... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    7,275 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/05
       When patients seek out podiatric products, they may be referred to companies and Web sites that may not offer a proper selection. Patients may have to search hours for the right product and podiatrists might lose potential income by not offering the items themselves. However, one company lets doctors sell the products they recommend through customized Web sites.    OurDoctorStore.com creates Internet storefronts for physicians. Lowell Scott Weil, Jr., DPM, MBA, says the company offers several benefits for podiatrists and their patients. One advantage of the ... continue reading
    By Neal M. Blitz, DPM
    39,356 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/05
       The impact of medial column hypermobility on foot function and deformity development has gained significant attention in the past few decades.1 It has been associated with pes planus, metatarsus primus adductus, hallux valgus, midfoot arthritis, metatarsalgia, plantar plate injury and lesser metatarsal stress fractures. Dudley Morton, an anatomist, introduced the concept of hypermobility.2 The so-called “Morton’s foot” includes hypermobility, equinus and a short first metatarsal.3    While the existence of hypermobility ... continue reading
    Guest Clinical Editor: Bruce Williams, DPM
    32,630 reads | 1 comments | 06/03/05
       Metatarsalgia is one of the more commonly seen complaints in any podiatry practice. Common treatments for the disorder include ice, removable metatarsal pads, antiinflammatories, injected steroids and physical therapy. While such treatments often completely resolve an acute bout of metatarsalgia, they often do nothing to remedy the true underlying biomechanical causes of the problem.    To correct the faulty foot biomechanics, DPMs rely on custom foot orthotics. Unfortunately, the devices are often no different than what one prescribes for any other foot di ... continue reading
    By Vincent J. Muscarella, DPM
    16,538 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/05
       Podiatric physicians routinely see disorders of the forefoot, especially the lesser metatarsophalangeal joints (MPJs). In fact, they are often the presenting complaint of the patient or the reason for the medical referral. Lesser MPJ disorders can also occur as a result of preexisting conditions such as trauma, infection, faulty biomechanics and previous podiatric surgery.    Unfortunately, the term metatarsalgia has been used as a catch-all term to describe a condition without a true etiology. This can be very frustrating to both the patient and the doctor ... continue reading
    By Bruce Werber, DPM
    9,065 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/05
       In these times of diminishing reimbursement, we must look at ways of decreasing the costs of our practices. Obviously, we cannot cut much from patient care costs and we have a limited ability to increase fees and income from our practices. In any business, there are ways to improve the net profit. One could implement extended hours to see more patients, minimize payroll costs by reducing staff or try to lower the cost of materials.    However, I recommend taking a closer look at technology and changing the standard workflow to improve efficiency and decreas ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    1,639 reads | 0 comments | 06/03/05
       Every June, we start thinking about next year. We actively seek out suggestions from our Editorial Advisory Board and other key contributors on the latest topics that would make for solid feature articles. We sit in on lectures during the Western Podiatric Medical Congress and subsequently approach the lecturers about converting their talks into future articles. It is all part of the process in developing the right editorial mix of innovative approaches and practical insights for both common conditions and other dilemmas one may see in practice.    Last year ... continue reading