Volume 18 - Issue 5 - May 2005

Wound Care Q&A »

Roundtable Insights On Imaging For Foot And Ankle Wounds

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 9681 reads | 0 comments

   When is advanced imaging necessary for guiding one’s decision-making on the treatment of a lower-extremity wound? How reliable are radiographs when clinicians suspect osteomyelitis? Should you employ magnetic resonance imaging? Does nuclear medicine imaging have particular value in managing wounds? Our expert panelists tackle these questions and more in the following discussion.

   Q: What role do you see advanced imaging playing in the management of foot and ankle wounds?

   A: Molly Judge, DPM, says advanced imaging is unnecessa



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How To Detect And Treat Running Injuries

By Brian Fullem, DPM | 24953 reads | 0 comments

   Many runners will consult a podiatrist for their initial physician visit for lower extremity injuries. Diagnosing and treating the most common running injuries requires finding the cause of the injury and going beyond simply treating the symptoms. Injured runners will often show up in the office with a bag full of old running shoes, a training log and a self-diagnosis. In my practice, runners tend to be the most well-informed patients and simply advising these patients to refrain from running could lead to them seeing another doctor.

   When seeing a runner



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Exploring New Advances In Internal Fixation

By Gerard V. Yu, DPM, Theresa L. Schinke, DPM, Amanda Meszaros, DPM, and Naohiro Shibuya, DPM | 11708 reads | 0 comments

Prior to the broad adoption of the principles and techniques of the AO/ASIF group, cerclage wires, K-wires and Steinmann pins as well as a variety of staples were the more common internal fixation devices employed for stabilizing fractures, osteotomies and fusions. Rigid internal compression fixation techniques eventually became more commonplace and the application of these techniques to foot and ankle surgery has led to clinical advances with improved surgical outcomes.
As technology advances and we increase our knowledge of bone healing from a variety of perspectives, newer designs in inte



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Chronic Plantar Fasciitis: Is Cryosurgery The Answer?

By Lawrence Fallat, DPM | 39425 reads | 0 comments

   Cryosurgery is the specialized field of using extremely low temperatures (controlled by a handheld probe) to destroy pathological tissue. This technique has been used for decades to treat malignant tumors of the prostate, liver and other organs.1-3 Cryosurgery is also gaining acceptance in dermatology, plastic surgery, urology and pain management.4-6 Now clinicians are using this technology to help manage common foot and ankle conditions.7-9

   I have been performing cryosurgery for Read the full story »

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Expert Insights On Mastering Staff Training

By John V. Guiliana, DPM, MS | 2704 reads | 0 comments

   Well-trained and efficient employees are crucial to the success of any business. Often a shortcoming, staff development is something that podiatric practitioners need to take seriously, building an integrated training process into their business plan. Without an adequate plan to train employees, doctors often feel as though the practice is inefficient and that they are constantly taking corrective measures.

   In many medical practices, staff training is often inadequate. What often winds up happening is having a new employee simply observe and work side by



Continuing Education »

Are Your Antibiotic Prescriptions In Line With Evidence-Based Medicine?

By Ann C. Anderson, DPM, and John S. Steinberg, DPM | 12133 reads | 0 comments

   Many of the treatment decisions made on a daily basis in medicine are not founded on or confirmed by the best available science. Some of these decisions are based on historic clinical standards and teachings yet to be scientifically proven while other decisions are made out of habit or sometimes a lack of appropriate information.

   The questions raised in this discussion are not intended to imply that every treatment decision must be based on randomized controlled trials. However, we do hope to point out many clinical misconceptions regarding the prescribi