Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • May 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 5
    Here is an intraoperative photo of a completed Austin bunionectomy, which is fixated with a Kompressor screw that provides enhanced rigid internal compression fixation across the plantar arm of the osteotomy.
    By Gerard V. Yu, DPM, Theresa L. Schinke, DPM, Amanda Meszaros, DPM, and Naohiro Shibuya, DPM
    12,171 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Prior to the broad adoption of the principles and techniques of the AO/ASIF group, cerclage wires, K-wires and Steinmann pins as well as a variety of staples were the more common internal fixation devices employed for stabilizing fractures, osteotomies and fusions. Rigid internal compression fixation techniques eventually became more commonplace and the application of these techniques to foot and ankle surgery has led to clinical advances with improved surgical outcomes. As technology advances and we increase our knowledge of bone healing from a variety of perspectives, newer designs in inte... continue reading
    Note the preoperative dorsal spurring in the above photos.
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    11,829 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       As I get more in tune with patient care, I find that the simple cases such as hallux limitus are more difficult than I initially thought because they are often more complicated and involved than the original examination might show. I have come to this conclusion after being burned by a couple of trouble cases and learning what to look for as a result.    A typical patient is a 47-year-old female with chronic pain in the great toe. She has trouble in dress shoes and has mild limitation of shoegear. The patient reports having mild pain when playing golf and th... continue reading
    Locating the exact area of heel pain is paramount to the success of cryosurgery. The circle represents the area of greatest pain with palpation.
    By Lawrence Fallat, DPM
    41,077 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Cryosurgery is the specialized field of using extremely low temperatures (controlled by a handheld probe) to destroy pathological tissue. This technique has been used for decades to treat malignant tumors of the prostate, liver and other organs.1-3 Cryosurgery is also gaining acceptance in dermatology, plastic surgery, urology and pain management.4-6 Now clinicians are using this technology to help manage common foot and ankle conditions.7-9    I have been performing cryosurgery for ... continue reading
    Aircast has improved its line of Pneumatic Walking Braces. The company says the more ergonomic design will encourage compliance.

    4,128 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Brace Yourself    For injured patients who need supportive and comfortable braces, clinicians may want to give an established product line another look.    The Aircast line of pneumatic walking braces, including the XP Walker™ (extra pneumatic), FP Walker™ (foam pneumatic) and SP Walker™ (short pneumatic), have been improved. The improved braces were unveiled recently at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.    In order to provide enhanced support and protection,... continue reading
    By John V. Guiliana, DPM, MS
    2,898 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Well-trained and efficient employees are crucial to the success of any business. Often a shortcoming, staff development is something that podiatric practitioners need to take seriously, building an integrated training process into their business plan. Without an adequate plan to train employees, doctors often feel as though the practice is inefficient and that they are constantly taking corrective measures.    In many medical practices, staff training is often inadequate. What often winds up happening is having a new employee simply observe and work side by ... continue reading