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  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • May 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 5
    By Gerard V. Yu, DPM, Theresa L. Schinke, DPM, Amanda Meszaros, DPM, and Naohiro Shibuya, DPM
    12,260 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/05
    Prior to the broad adoption of the principles and techniques of the AO/ASIF group, cerclage wires, K-wires and Steinmann pins as well as a variety of staples were the more common internal fixation devices employed for stabilizing fractures, osteotomies and fusions. Rigid internal compression fixation techniques eventually became more commonplace and the application of these techniques to foot and ankle surgery has led to clinical advances with improved surgical outcomes. As technology advances and we increase our knowledge of bone healing from a variety of perspectives, newer designs in inte ... continue reading
    By Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor
    8,521 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/05
       Chronic plantar fasciitis and Morton’s neuroma are two persistent conditions that podiatrists frequently see among their patients. However, practitioners are seeing results with a surgical system that succeeds when conservative treatments fail to alleviate these conditions.    The KobyGard™ System (OsteoMed) enables surgeons to isolate and cut both the transverse metatarsal ligament and plantar fascia through a small incision. The system is comprised of a variety of instruments including a tissue locator, a ligament separator, a fascia separat ... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    1,832 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/05
       I tried to apply a soft fiberglass cast to the leg of a screaming 4-month-old baby boy last week. It was toward the end of a very busy day and, in most cases, a screaming baby would not be an opportunity I would seek. In this case, the child’s screaming was music to my ears.    The baby boy was one of my curveballs. A curveball is a category of patient that presents with particularly difficult foot problems or health problems. This baby was referred to me by Isaac Pope, MD, my most reliable source of “curveballs.”    Isaac is a pediat ... continue reading
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    10,258 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/05
       When is advanced imaging necessary for guiding one’s decision-making on the treatment of a lower-extremity wound? How reliable are radiographs when clinicians suspect osteomyelitis? Should you employ magnetic resonance imaging? Does nuclear medicine imaging have particular value in managing wounds? Our expert panelists tackle these questions and more in the following discussion.    Q: What role do you see advanced imaging playing in the management of foot and ankle wounds?    A: Molly Judge, DPM, says advanced imaging is unnecessa ... continue reading

    9,795 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/05
       The debate that continues about the DPM/MD or DPM/DO dual degree is understandable, as demonstrated by Duane Dumm, DPM (see pg. 14, “Dual Degrees May Not Benefit DPMs,” March issue). Change is difficult. Change is suspect. Change is resisted. However, in podiatric medicine, change is a function of rapid growth with dimensions of practice that many take for granted and perhaps others do not fully realize.    First, dual degrees are not simply programs designed to benefit the DPM. While there certainly is a benefit to the podiatric physician, the ultimate ... continue reading