Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • May 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 5
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    5,423 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/05
       Congressional legislation has been able to hold off cuts in Medicare reimbursement for the last several years. However, the relief may have been only temporary. If Congress does not take further action beyond the temporary 2004-05 legislative fix, physicians may see a reduction in Medicare reimbursement in 2006.    Without a legislative remedy, podiatrists will see a 5.2 percent reduction in Medicare payments next year, notes Julie K. Letwat, JD, MPH, the Director of Health Policy and Practice Advocacy for the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACF ... continue reading
    By Ann C. Anderson, DPM, and John S. Steinberg, DPM
    12,823 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/05
       Many of the treatment decisions made on a daily basis in medicine are not founded on or confirmed by the best available science. Some of these decisions are based on historic clinical standards and teachings yet to be scientifically proven while other decisions are made out of habit or sometimes a lack of appropriate information.    The questions raised in this discussion are not intended to imply that every treatment decision must be based on randomized controlled trials. However, we do hope to point out many clinical misconceptions regarding the prescribi ... continue reading
    By Graham A. Hamilton, DPM
    28,657 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/05
       A challenging problem for any podiatric surgeon is surgically managing cases in which a silicone elastomer implant in the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) has failed. When patients initially present with this problem, they will complain of pain, deformity or both at either the first or lesser metatarsophalangeal joints.    The cause of the pain or deformity can be multifactorial. The possible causes may include: chronic synovitis and swelling around the implant; chronic skin fistulas; implant breakage or fragmentation; severe periarticular bony subside ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    1,866 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/05
       As a lifelong East Coast guy entering my mid-thirties, I find that I have more appreciation for the simple things that come with the emergence of spring. I relish sleeping with the windows open. I notice the hostas springing back to life in the garden. Even my cynicism softens (albeit temporarily). Of course, no spring would be complete without a couple of delusional resolutions, whether they are grandiose home improvement plans or a renewed commitment to develop more of a regular exercise routine.    Sure enough, it seems like every corner you turn, there a ... continue reading
    By Brian Fullem, DPM
    26,073 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/05
       Many runners will consult a podiatrist for their initial physician visit for lower extremity injuries. Diagnosing and treating the most common running injuries requires finding the cause of the injury and going beyond simply treating the symptoms. Injured runners will often show up in the office with a bag full of old running shoes, a training log and a self-diagnosis. In my practice, runners tend to be the most well-informed patients and simply advising these patients to refrain from running could lead to them seeing another doctor.    When seeing a runner ... continue reading
    By Suhad A. Hadi, DPM
    20,976 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/05
       Diabetic neuropathy is a major risk factor in patients with diabetes. However, a larger impending threat to patients with neuropathy is the risk of developing Charcot arthropathy and ultimately an ulcer that causes deformity or joint instability. In patients with diabetic neuropathy, Charcot arthropathy alone results in an increased risk of ulceration and/or amputation.1 The subsequent deformities one sees with Charcot, predominantly the rocker bottom deformity, are due to the loss of structural joint integrity.    The subsequent deformities one ... continue reading
    By Gerard V. Yu, DPM, Theresa L. Schinke, DPM, Amanda Meszaros, DPM, and Naohiro Shibuya, DPM
    12,243 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/05
    Prior to the broad adoption of the principles and techniques of the AO/ASIF group, cerclage wires, K-wires and Steinmann pins as well as a variety of staples were the more common internal fixation devices employed for stabilizing fractures, osteotomies and fusions. Rigid internal compression fixation techniques eventually became more commonplace and the application of these techniques to foot and ankle surgery has led to clinical advances with improved surgical outcomes. As technology advances and we increase our knowledge of bone healing from a variety of perspectives, newer designs in inte ... continue reading
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    11,995 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/05
       As I get more in tune with patient care, I find that the simple cases such as hallux limitus are more difficult than I initially thought because they are often more complicated and involved than the original examination might show. I have come to this conclusion after being burned by a couple of trouble cases and learning what to look for as a result.    A typical patient is a 47-year-old female with chronic pain in the great toe. She has trouble in dress shoes and has mild limitation of shoegear. The patient reports having mild pain when playing golf and th ... continue reading
    By Lawrence Fallat, DPM
    41,502 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/05
       Cryosurgery is the specialized field of using extremely low temperatures (controlled by a handheld probe) to destroy pathological tissue. This technique has been used for decades to treat malignant tumors of the prostate, liver and other organs.1-3 Cryosurgery is also gaining acceptance in dermatology, plastic surgery, urology and pain management.4-6 Now clinicians are using this technology to help manage common foot and ankle conditions.7-9    I have been performing cryosurgery for ... continue reading

    4,187 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/05
    Brace Yourself    For injured patients who need supportive and comfortable braces, clinicians may want to give an established product line another look.    The Aircast line of pneumatic walking braces, including the XP Walker™ (extra pneumatic), FP Walker™ (foam pneumatic) and SP Walker™ (short pneumatic), have been improved. The improved braces were unveiled recently at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.    In order to provide enhanced support and protection, ... continue reading