Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
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  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • May 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 5
    Aircast has improved its line of Pneumatic Walking Braces. The company says the more ergonomic design will encourage compliance.

    4,126 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Brace Yourself    For injured patients who need supportive and comfortable braces, clinicians may want to give an established product line another look.    The Aircast line of pneumatic walking braces, including the XP Walker™ (extra pneumatic), FP Walker™ (foam pneumatic) and SP Walker™ (short pneumatic), have been improved. The improved braces were unveiled recently at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.    In order to provide enhanced support and protection,... continue reading
    By John V. Guiliana, DPM, MS
    2,897 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Well-trained and efficient employees are crucial to the success of any business. Often a shortcoming, staff development is something that podiatric practitioners need to take seriously, building an integrated training process into their business plan. Without an adequate plan to train employees, doctors often feel as though the practice is inefficient and that they are constantly taking corrective measures.    In many medical practices, staff training is often inadequate. What often winds up happening is having a new employee simply observe and work side by ... continue reading
    Ninth in a series
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    5,378 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Congressional legislation has been able to hold off cuts in Medicare reimbursement for the last several years. However, the relief may have been only temporary. If Congress does not take further action beyond the temporary 2004-05 legislative fix, physicians may see a reduction in Medicare reimbursement in 2006.    Without a legislative remedy, podiatrists will see a 5.2 percent reduction in Medicare payments next year, notes Julie K. Letwat, JD, MPH, the Director of Health Policy and Practice Advocacy for the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACF... continue reading
    Here is an acute deep space abscess in a patient who has diabetes. This infection will likely require a combination of aggressive surgical management and systemic antibiotic agents.
    By Ann C. Anderson, DPM, and John S. Steinberg, DPM
    12,692 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Many of the treatment decisions made on a daily basis in medicine are not founded on or confirmed by the best available science. Some of these decisions are based on historic clinical standards and teachings yet to be scientifically proven while other decisions are made out of habit or sometimes a lack of appropriate information.    The questions raised in this discussion are not intended to imply that every treatment decision must be based on randomized controlled trials. However, we do hope to point out many clinical misconceptions regarding the prescribi... continue reading
    Here is a preoperative radiograph of a symptomatic failed silastic implant with varus subluxation of the hallux on the second and third digits. This anterior-posterior view shows extensive cystic change of the proximal phalanx and the first metatarsal hea
    By Graham A. Hamilton, DPM
    28,409 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       A challenging problem for any podiatric surgeon is surgically managing cases in which a silicone elastomer implant in the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) has failed. When patients initially present with this problem, they will complain of pain, deformity or both at either the first or lesser metatarsophalangeal joints.    The cause of the pain or deformity can be multifactorial. The possible causes may include: chronic synovitis and swelling around the implant; chronic skin fistulas; implant breakage or fragmentation; severe periarticular bony subside... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    1,841 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       As a lifelong East Coast guy entering my mid-thirties, I find that I have more appreciation for the simple things that come with the emergence of spring. I relish sleeping with the windows open. I notice the hostas springing back to life in the garden. Even my cynicism softens (albeit temporarily). Of course, no spring would be complete without a couple of delusional resolutions, whether they are grandiose home improvement plans or a renewed commitment to develop more of a regular exercise routine.    Sure enough, it seems like every corner you turn, there a... continue reading
    Here one can see a KobyGard instrument being used in the third interspace during a nerve decompression procedure. When using the KobyGard for nerve decompression of the intermetatarsal space, Dr. Gerbert says 90 percent of his patients are symptom-free af
    By Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor
    8,415 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Chronic plantar fasciitis and Morton’s neuroma are two persistent conditions that podiatrists frequently see among their patients. However, practitioners are seeing results with a surgical system that succeeds when conservative treatments fail to alleviate these conditions.    The KobyGard™ System (OsteoMed) enables surgeons to isolate and cut both the transverse metatarsal ligament and plantar fascia through a small incision. The system is comprised of a variety of instruments including a tissue locator, a ligament separator, a fascia separat... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    1,809 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       I tried to apply a soft fiberglass cast to the leg of a screaming 4-month-old baby boy last week. It was toward the end of a very busy day and, in most cases, a screaming baby would not be an opportunity I would seek. In this case, the child’s screaming was music to my ears.    The baby boy was one of my curveballs. A curveball is a category of patient that presents with particularly difficult foot problems or health problems. This baby was referred to me by Isaac Pope, MD, my most reliable source of “curveballs.”    Isaac is a pediat... continue reading
    When it comes to osteomyelitis (as shown above), there are a variety of imaging techniques one can use to help confirm the diagnosis, according to Thomas Zgonis, DPM. (Photo courtesy of Robert Snyder, DPM)
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    10,164 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       When is advanced imaging necessary for guiding one’s decision-making on the treatment of a lower-extremity wound? How reliable are radiographs when clinicians suspect osteomyelitis? Should you employ magnetic resonance imaging? Does nuclear medicine imaging have particular value in managing wounds? Our expert panelists tackle these questions and more in the following discussion.    Q: What role do you see advanced imaging playing in the management of foot and ankle wounds?    A: Molly Judge, DPM, says advanced imaging is unnecessa... continue reading

    9,715 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       The debate that continues about the DPM/MD or DPM/DO dual degree is understandable, as demonstrated by Duane Dumm, DPM (see pg. 14, “Dual Degrees May Not Benefit DPMs,” March issue). Change is difficult. Change is suspect. Change is resisted. However, in podiatric medicine, change is a function of rapid growth with dimensions of practice that many take for granted and perhaps others do not fully realize.    First, dual degrees are not simply programs designed to benefit the DPM. While there certainly is a benefit to the podiatric physician, the ultimate ... continue reading