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  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
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  • April 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 4
    Note the fibular deviation of the hallux at the first MTPJ.
    By Peter A. Blume, DPM, Kenneth L. Cornell, DPM, and Robert Schoen, MD
    5,398 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory polyarthritis that involves small and large joints, and affects approximately 1 percent of the population in the United States.1 The natural progression of the disease leads to irreversible deformity in the hands and feet with destruction of bone and articular cartilage. This may ultimately lead to the loss of function of the extremity. There are numerous extraarticular manifestations of RA (i.e., including vasculitis). They can affect any organ system and result in premature death.    Over the ... continue reading
    Alona Kashanian, DPM, says children with internal femoral torsion may be clumsy with sports and running, and have a history of frequent falls. She emphasizes a thorough diagnostic exam to rule out metatarsus adductus.
    Guest Clinical Editor: Eric Feit, DPM
    21,625 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       While one must take special considerations into account while prescribing orthotics for children, different pediatric conditions also warrant special care. Following up on the previous discussion of pediatric orthotics (see “Expert Insights On Prescribing Pediatric Orthotics,” page 24, February issue), our expert panelists discuss key orthotic pearls in treating metatarsus adductus, abnormal femoral torsion and flatfoot in the pediatric population.    Q: Are orthotics helpful for a rigid metatarsus adductus foot type?    A: Rich... continue reading
    This clinical photograph, taken eight weeks postoperatively, depicts the incision placement of the talonavicular arthrodesis.
    By William Fishco, DPM
    43,860 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       The talonavicular joint arthrodesis has been utilized for a variety of pathologies of the foot. Instability and subluxation of the rearfoot in adult acquired pes valgus is the most common reason for rearfoot fusion. Congenital deformities, neuromuscular diseases and arthritic conditions, whether they are from an inflammatory arthritis, osteoarthritis or posttraumatic causes, are less common pathologies that would require fusion of the talonavicular joint.1    In a rigid rearfoot deformity, such as a multiplanar deformity with heel valgus, forefoot... continue reading