Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • January 2002 | Volume 15 - Issue 1
    Be sure to inject the dilute solution of alcohol proximal to the point of maximum tenderness.
    Gary Dockery, DPM
    1,854 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08

    3,477 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Should you use compression bandages to help treat patients with venous leg ulcers? A recent study reveals a downside to using these bandages. Some patients who were treated for venous leg ulcers with compression bandaging developed toe ulcerations and interdigital clefts, according to the study reported in a recent edition of the British Medical Journal. Out of 194 patients being treated for venous leg ulcers with either three- or four-layer compression bandages, the study revealed twelve of the patients developed ulcerations in their toes after being treated for several months with four-lay... continue reading
    Gary Dockery, DPM
    1,828 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Here is a pre-operative view of a foot with hypertrophied 
navicular bone.
    By Richard T. Braver, DPM
    147,959 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
    In my experience, the Modified Kidner procedure is one of the most reliable operations for reducing arch pain associated with an accessory navicular bone (a.k.a. os tibial externum). You can also use this procedure to treat a prominence at the inner aspect of the arch, which has been caused by an enlarged navicular bone. The most common patients to visit our office with these problems are between the ages of 8 and 15 and are involved in activities like ice skating, ballet and soccer. What precipitates the pain? It will usually be caused by rubbing of the skate or other footwear against the p... continue reading
    Be sure to inject the dilute solution of alcohol proximal to the point of maximum tenderness.
    Gary Dockery, DPM
    131,186 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Foot neuromas are very common findings, especially those that are termed intermetatarsal neuromas (or interdigital neuromas). The painful condition is believed to be caused by sensory nerve irritation, injury or abnormal mechanics of the foot. Yes, there are conservative care modalities as well as surgical treatment measures. However, I believe chemical neurolysis (using a dilute solution of ethyl alcohol) gives us a viable alternative for treating the foot neuroma as it has fewer potential complications and up to an 89 percent success rate.1 First things first. When it comes to diagnosing ne... continue reading
    New from Apex, the Hidden Depth Rocker Soles improve stability and offer additional  foot support.

    2,452 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Active patients often need specialized products to protect vulnerable knees and ankles. Now you may recommend the PPT Gel Stirrup Ankle Support, which reduces sprains and injury-related pain and edema. According to the manufacturer Langer, the ankle support contains a two-chambered bladder of air and gel for cold therapy use. Langer says the cushioning brace controls eversion and inversion, and allows for normal plantarflexion and dorsiflexion. Not only does the contoured shell closely adhere to the ankle in athletic shoes, Langer says you’ll find that the ankle support is adjustable so i... continue reading
    Here you can see onychomycosis that cannot be cured via debridement alone. If left untreated, the onychomycosis will cause damage to the nail matrix. Below, you see the cured nail, 72 weeks after the patient started taking Lamisil (terbinafine) tablets
    By Richard Pollak, DPM, MS
    7,618 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Patients with onychomycosis are becoming increasingly aware that oral antifungals have the potential to cure their underlying infections, yet a recent study finds the majority of podiatrists continue to rely largely on debridement to provide symptomatic relief. As a profession, we’re quite knowledgeable about the various approaches to treating onychomycosis, but this study reveals that current treatment practices are aligned only partially with patients’ attitudes and behaviors regarding their infections. The study, a survey of over 900 onychomycosis patients and over 600 doctors conducted... continue reading
    By Jeff A. Hall
    4,660 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Foot neuromas are relatively common as they affect all adult age groups. According to the literature on this subject, there are a variety of potential causes (including sensory nerve irritation, injury, tight shoes and biomechanical dysfunction) that may contribute to the common nature of this condition. Some say chemical neurolysis provides a viable treatment alternative, citing the technique’s high success rates and fewer complications. Yet this modality (which has been around for over 50 years) still remains the least commonly applied solution for treating neuromas.Why? Obviously, it’s ... continue reading
    By Michael Metzger, DPM, MBA
    12,940 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Whether you are a new practitioner opening your first office or a veteran DPM setting up shop in a new location, having an effective business plan is a necessity. The business plan is a promotional selling document. Indeed, it is a major tool for selling your business to a banker. It is to the banker what the history and physical are for physicians.Since a major audience for your business plan consists of higher-ups at the bank, the black and white of your plan is far more important than a winning personality. Gone are the days when you could stroll into the bank, say you are going to do the... continue reading
    Here is a lateral radiograph of a midfoot Charcot deformity with recurrence after an attempted surgical reconstruction.
    By William Scott Rogers
    14,033 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    When managing patients in the acute phase of Charcot neuroarthropathy, the hallmark of treatment is immobilization and non-weightbearing of the affected foot until the destructive nature of this stage disappears and the coalescence stage begins. In the past decade, researchers have hypothesized that using bisphosphonates in acute Charcot patients can decrease pathological fractures and permanent deformity, which commonly occur in these patients.If this is true, then using bisphosphonates may also lead to less deformity, shorter treatment time, a decreased need for revisional surgery, decreased... continue reading