Volume 18 - Issue 3 - March 2005

Feature »

Current And Emerging Options For Treating Diabetic Neuropathy

By Stephanie Wu, DPM | 33067 reads | 0 comments

   Neuropathy is a common and debilitating complication of diabetes mellitus. According to data compiled by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease (NIDDK) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA), roughly 60 to 70 percent of the 18.2 million Americans with diabetes will develop some form of diabetic neuropathy and about 3 million patients with diabetes will experience painful neuropathy.

   There are three broad types of neuropathy (sensory, motor and autonomic) associated with diabetes. Sensory neuropathy is the most prevalent



Feature »

Point-Counterpoint: Active Charcot: Should You Proceed With Surgery?

By Peter M. Wilusz, DPM, Guy R. Pupp, DPM, and Molly Judge, DPM | 10140 reads | 0 comments

Yes, these authors say early identification of the Charcot process and prompt surgical intervention can prevent progression of the deformity and related complications.

By Peter M. Wilusz, DPM and Guy R. Pupp, DPM

   The presentation of Charcot neuroarthropathy has been historically problematic for the foot and ankle surgeon. Acute Charcot has traditionally been treated with conservative therapy as most attempts at treatment involve immobilization and removal of weightbearing forces from the involved foot. Many surgeons do not surgically address the acute Char



Feature »

Inside Secrets For Maximizing Efficiency

By Robert Smith, Contributing Editor | 3616 reads | 0 comments

   When a practice’s bottom line is not as strong as it should be, one should take a serious look at overhead costs but it is also important to look at how you and your staff are doing your jobs. There are things podiatrists can do to make more efficient use of staff, technology and process, and accordingly rein in runaway costs. Indeed, there are few practices out there that could not benefit financially from being more efficient.

    “The idea is to look from the outside in,” says Hal Ornstein, DPM. “You are always inside the operation and you cannot



Continuing Education »

How To Manage Heel Ulcers In Patients With Diabetes

By Jonathan Moore, DPM, and Pamela Jensen, DPM | 36736 reads | 0 comments

   Diabetic heel ulcers constitute one of the most frustrating problems for podiatric physicians. Pressure ulcers affect nearly 2 million people each year and account for annual healthcare costs that range between $2.2 billion and $3.6 billion. The heel is the second leading site for development of pressure ulcers after the sacrum.1 While patients with diabetes are living longer than in the past, the incidence of hospital-acquired heel ulcers increased from 19 percent in 1989 to 30 percent in 1993.2

   Costs for heel ulcers are nearly dou



Editor's Perspective »

Addressing The Ongoing Challenge Of Diabetes Care

By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor | 2009 reads | 0 comments

   Over 18 percent of people age 60 and over in the United States have diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, 1.3 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed every year in people over the age of 20. Between 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have mild to severe forms of nervous system damage, a major contributing factor to lower-extremity amputation. Greater than 60 percent of nontraumatic lower-limb amputations in the U.S. occur among patients with diabetes.

   With these statistics in mind, we present our Fifth Annual Diabetes theme



Forum »

Learning About Surgeons From A Narcissistic Cat

By John McCord, DPM | 4521 reads | 0 comments

   One of my most valuable fixed assets is my old cat Bob. He is actually my son’s cat. My son asked if we would watch Bob while he explored the world for a few months. That was nine years ago. Bob is a narcissist. He has all of the narcissistic personality traits. He is exploitative, grandiose, preoccupied with success, feels unique, feels entitled, seeks admiration, lacks empathy, is envious and is hypersensitive to criticism.

   Bob’s behavior is often disruptive to the rest of the family pets, which have all run away at this point. There is not a thing