Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • March 2005 | Volume 18 - Issue 3
    Here one can see hemodynamically significant stenosis at the origin of the left anterior tibial artery.
    By John E. Aruny, MD, Peter Blume, DPM, Bauer Sumpio, MD, PhD, and Benjamin Buren, DPM
    13,824 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Chronic critical limb ischemia has been defined as a non-healing ulceration or gangrene of the foot or toes, and/or rest pain that requires regular use of analgesics.1 These patients will require some type of intervention to resolve their condition. It can be particularly challenging to salvage the limb of a patient who has failed a bypass. The objective of revascularization is to augment blood flow to allow for wound healing and avoid major amputation resulting in the need for a prosthesis.    Amputation of one or more digits or even transmetatar... continue reading
    By Robert Smith, Contributing Editor
    4,129 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       When a practice’s bottom line is not as strong as it should be, one should take a serious look at overhead costs but it is also important to look at how you and your staff are doing your jobs. There are things podiatrists can do to make more efficient use of staff, technology and process, and accordingly rein in runaway costs. Indeed, there are few practices out there that could not benefit financially from being more efficient.     “The idea is to look from the outside in,” says Hal Ornstein, DPM. “You are always inside the operation and you cannot ... continue reading
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    30,785 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Problems with the lateral column are more common than we believe. Although there is a great deal of understanding of medial column problems and their solutions, there is not as much information on lateral column symptoms, causes and treatment options. With this in mind, let us take a closer look at these potential symptoms and treatment options that our institute has found helpful for such problems.    A typical patient may have an equinus and pain in the lateral foot and ankle. The pain is localized to the rearfoot and lateral ankle with tenderness along th... continue reading
    Here one can see well-adhered ischemic eschar. The authors used conservative care including topical enzymatic agents until the eschar began to slough around the periphery.
    By Jonathan Moore, DPM, and Pamela Jensen, DPM
    38,756 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Diabetic heel ulcers constitute one of the most frustrating problems for podiatric physicians. Pressure ulcers affect nearly 2 million people each year and account for annual healthcare costs that range between $2.2 billion and $3.6 billion. The heel is the second leading site for development of pressure ulcers after the sacrum.1 While patients with diabetes are living longer than in the past, the incidence of hospital-acquired heel ulcers increased from 19 percent in 1989 to 30 percent in 1993.2    Costs for heel ulcers are nearly dou... continue reading
    Seventh in a series
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    6,713 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       The potential side effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including COX-2 inhibitors, have been well documented recently. The highly publicized Public Health Advisory from the Food and Drug Administration on celecoxib (Celebrex) and rofecoxib (Vioxx) has increased the discussion about the safety of such agents. What types of side effects should one be wary of with NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors, and what screening precautions can one take?    Nicholas Grumbine, DPM, has seen gastrointestinal (GI) difficulties and bleeding in patients taking ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Executive Editor
    2,135 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Over 18 percent of people age 60 and over in the United States have diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, 1.3 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed every year in people over the age of 20. Between 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have mild to severe forms of nervous system damage, a major contributing factor to lower-extremity amputation. Greater than 60 percent of nontraumatic lower-limb amputations in the U.S. occur among patients with diabetes.    With these statistics in mind, we present our Fifth Annual Diabetes theme ... continue reading
    Here one can see a medial capsular incision from the dorsal medial aspect of the proximal portion of the metatarsal head.
    By Richard O. Lundeen, DPM
    14,575 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Back when I left the didactic world of podiatry school and entered my residency, I was ready for a transition that would blend the books with practice. Of course, the first two surgeries I performed did not fit the mold. The first one was a cartilage articulation preservation procedure (CAPP) and the other was a Keller procedure.    The CAPP procedure was familiar to me only in books and the Keller seemed “outdated.” To my surprise, both surgeries turned out well and gave me an appreciation that diverse types of procedures can have a good outcome when t... continue reading
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    11,135 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       While there is quite an array of choices when it comes to choosing appropriate wound care modalities for lower-extremity wounds, there is not, as one panelist points out, a lot of published evidence for guidance. With this in mind, our expert panelists discuss a variety of wound care scenarios and how their clinical experience guides their decision-making on dressings and debriding agents.    Q: Given the multitude of wound care dressings available, how do you narrow down your choice of wound dressings?    A: Eric Espensen, DPM, and... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    4,788 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       One of my most valuable fixed assets is my old cat Bob. He is actually my son’s cat. My son asked if we would watch Bob while he explored the world for a few months. That was nine years ago. Bob is a narcissist. He has all of the narcissistic personality traits. He is exploitative, grandiose, preoccupied with success, feels unique, feels entitled, seeks admiration, lacks empathy, is envious and is hypersensitive to criticism.    Bob’s behavior is often disruptive to the rest of the family pets, which have all run away at this point. There is not a thing ... continue reading
    Here one can see a small plantar wound probing directly to the calcaneus. Intraoperative cultures yielded MRSA and MRSE.
    By David G. Armstrong, DPM, MSc, PhD
    44,659 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Foot ulcers are a major predictor of future lower limb amputations. Fourteen to 24 percent of patients with diabetes with foot ulcers eventually require an amputation and more than 60 percent of nontraumatic lower extremity amputations occur in those with diabetes.1,2 Although risk factors may vary, the majority of diabetes-related amputations result from peripheral arterial disease, peripheral neuropathy or infection.3    The healthcare costs associated with diabetic foot infections are staggering. In an analysis of medical and pharmac... continue reading