Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • December 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 12
    With deep vein thrombosis, there is a triad of hypercoagulability, venous stasis and endothelial damage.
    By Allan B. Grossman, DPM and Matt Sowa, DPM
    43,383 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Venous thromboembolism (VTE) or deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common medical condition associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Undiagnosed and untreated VTE can put patients at an unacceptable risk for a pulmonary embolism, which can be fatal. Thromboemboli account for 600,000 new cases, 300,000 admissions and approximately 100,000 deaths a year. Given that VTE has a recurrence rate of approximately 30 percent, early diagnosis and treatment are imperative.    In order to understand the risk factors of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), one must firs... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    3,791 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       This is one of my editorials that will irritate the DPMs who equate being a podiatrist with canonization. You guys and gals might want to toss this issue aside or take an extra Paxil or Wellbutrin. Some of the decisions we make and the things we do compel us to take a harder look in the mirror.    We need to be more careful about operating on developmentally delayed, mentally ill and drug addicted patients. Most of these patients are not capable of making an informed decision alone and need the assistance of a competent advocate. This could be a relative, gu... continue reading
    By Paul R. Scherer, DPM
    73,470 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Podiatrists have been treating tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) conservatively for decades although there is no clinical outcome study to document the effectiveness of orthotics for this syndrome. Most podiatrists rely on the anecdotal evidence and their own experience to prescribe orthoses, which are intended to change the position of the foot and reduce the trauma and traction of the posterior tibial nerve at the flexor retinaculum.    First defined by Keck in 1962, tarsal tunnel syndrome is a relatively common problem that podiatrists see in their practice an... continue reading