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  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • December 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 12
    By Paul R. Scherer, DPM
    86,584 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/04
       Podiatrists have been treating tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) conservatively for decades although there is no clinical outcome study to document the effectiveness of orthotics for this syndrome. Most podiatrists rely on the anecdotal evidence and their own experience to prescribe orthoses, which are intended to change the position of the foot and reduce the trauma and traction of the posterior tibial nerve at the flexor retinaculum.    First defined by Keck in 1962, tarsal tunnel syndrome is a relatively common problem that podiatrists see in their practice an ... continue reading

    3,028 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/04
       I believe your recent editorial was inappropriate. (See “Emphasizing Accountability For Seniors On Election Day,” page 15, October issue.) You made some half-baked effort to try and present some kind of balance in your editorial but your bias was obvious. You knocked President George Bush’s accomplishments in Medicare and touted the possibility that Senator John Kerry’s plan would be superior.    You, like so much of America, have taken Kerry’s statements at face value. Make no mistake about it. Kerry’s plan is socialized medicine. The ultra-lib ... continue reading
    By Gary L. Dockery, DPM, FACFAS
    67,619 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/04
       Granuloma annulare (GA) is a benign inflammatory, self-limiting granulomatous dermatoses characterized by a variable clinical presentation of dermal and subcutaneous lesions. Although this condition may occur at any age, it is predominantly a disease of children ranging in age from 2 to 10 and adults who are younger than 30. GA is very common in young females as they are twice as likely to be affected than males. Foot involvement occurs in more than 70 percent of all patients with GA and hand involvement occurs in 60 percent of patients.    The lesions may ... continue reading