Volume 17 - Issue 12 - December 2004

Feature »

Rethinking Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

By Paul R. Scherer, DPM | 69639 reads | 0 comments

   Podiatrists have been treating tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) conservatively for decades although there is no clinical outcome study to document the effectiveness of orthotics for this syndrome. Most podiatrists rely on the anecdotal evidence and their own experience to prescribe orthoses, which are intended to change the position of the foot and reduce the trauma and traction of the posterior tibial nerve at the flexor retinaculum.

   First defined by Keck in 1962, tarsal tunnel syndrome is a relatively common problem that podiatrists see in their practice an



Feature »

How To Detect And Treat Granuloma Annulare

By Gary L. Dockery, DPM, FACFAS | 58025 reads | 0 comments

   Granuloma annulare (GA) is a benign inflammatory, self-limiting granulomatous dermatoses characterized by a variable clinical presentation of dermal and subcutaneous lesions. Although this condition may occur at any age, it is predominantly a disease of children ranging in age from 2 to 10 and adults who are younger than 30. GA is very common in young females as they are twice as likely to be affected than males. Foot involvement occurs in more than 70 percent of all patients with GA and hand involvement occurs in 60 percent of patients.

   The lesions may



Feature »

Can JCAHO Patient Safety Goals Have An Impact?

By Steven Chinn, DPM, MS | 7007 reads | 0 comments

Everyone dreads the potential experience of making a mistake that affects patient care. However, the complexity of healthcare lends itself to these situations. Caring for patients requires a series of interconnecting steps in order to produce the desired outcome. As physicians and surgeons try to minimize the variables that arise, there are still factors, some of which we are accountable for and some not, that can add up to a bad clinical outcome.
Many states have regulations that require licensed healthcare facilities, such as hospitals and nursing homes, to report any unusual patient care p



Continuing Education »

How To Perform The Double Calcaneal Osteotomy

By Alan R. Catanzariti, DPM, Robert W. Mendicino, DPM, and Brian D. Neerings, DPM | 23998 reads | 0 comments

   The double calcaneal osteotomy includes a combination of the posterior calcaneal displacement osteotomy (PCDO) and the Evans anterior opening wedge calcaneal osteotomy. One would consider this combination for symptomatic flexible flatfoot deformity in both the adolescent flexible flatfoot and the adult with late stage II (Johnson and Strom’s classification) posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD).

   The PCDO consists of a transcortical osteotomy through the posterior tuber of the calcaneus with medial transposition of the tuberosity. The PCDO displaces



Editor's Perspective »

Striving For A Diversity Of Clinical Topics

By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief | 1573 reads | 0 comments

   When I first started working on this magazine, we did a small survey of readers to help determine the direction of the magazine when we took it over from the former publisher. The majority of readers said they wanted to see more clinical topics and we have pursued this editorial agenda over the years with some practice management articles mixed in as well.

   It is an ongoing education for us to provide just the right mix of articles that tackle emerging clinical topics as well as articles that discuss conditions that you see every day in your practice. Tha



Forum »

When Patients Are Not Capable Of Informed Consent

By John McCord, DPM | 3658 reads | 0 comments

   This is one of my editorials that will irritate the DPMs who equate being a podiatrist with canonization. You guys and gals might want to toss this issue aside or take an extra Paxil or Wellbutrin. Some of the decisions we make and the things we do compel us to take a harder look in the mirror.

   We need to be more careful about operating on developmentally delayed, mentally ill and drug addicted patients. Most of these patients are not capable of making an informed decision alone and need the assistance of a competent advocate. This could be a relative, gu



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