Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • November 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 11
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    7,751 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/04
       For a few Tuesday nights out of the year, podiatric residents across the country will compete with fellow residents in other programs to test their knowledge. The game is not Jeopardy but the Residency Challenge, also known as the Residency Rumble, an academic tournament wherein residents from 76 programs draw upon their knowledge to answer questions on all aspects of podiatry.    The brainchild of Podiatric Residency Education Services Network (PRESENT), these Tuesday night Web-based programs will occur four times a year, according to PRESENT CEO Alan Sherm ... continue reading
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, CWS, and Susan E. Erredge, DPM, CWS
    46,458 reads | 2 comments | 11/03/04
       Plantar fasciitis/heel pain syndrome is the most common condition treated by podiatric foot and ankle specialists in the United States.1 However, the true etiology of plantar fasciitis is still unknown and has been attributed to many different etiological factors. Even the term “plantar fasciitis” is a misnomer as the plantar fascia is really a tendonous aponeurosis and not a fascial layer.2    It is entirely possible that our whole paradigm for treating plantar fasciitis is based on a false foundation, especially in light of the h ... continue reading
    By Patrick J. Nunan, DPM
    22,244 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/04
       Plantar heel pain is one of the most common maladies we see in podiatric practice. Patients learn on their first visit that the symptoms usually respond to conservative treatment over a six- to 12-week timeframe, although some individuals may take six to 12 months to be totally pain-free. Athletes may have difficulty accepting the fact that they may have lingering pain over six to 12 months. Not only may the athlete be upset, one may also draw the ire of the coach, athletic trainer, agent or parent.    When treating an athlete with plantar heel pain, podiatr ... continue reading