Volume 17 - Issue 11 - November 2004

Diagnostic Dilemmas »

How To Detect And Treat Tarsal Coalitions

By Justin Franson, DPM, and Babak Baravarian, DPM | 31588 reads | 0 comments

   A 20-year-old male presents to your office with a painful sinus tarsi, medial arch and a history of recurrent ankle sprains over the last few years. The pain seems to limit his activities more and more, and he is frustrated with his lack of improvement. He has seen a few doctors for this problem, and has been treated with orthotics, ankle braces, physical therapy and NSAIDs. He wants to know why he is not getting better and what you can do to get him back to playing tennis.

   The majority of patients who walk (or limp) into our offices have conditions that



Wound Care Q&A »

What You Should Know About Using Silver Products In Wound Care

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 107341 reads | 1 comments

   Whether it is used as a topical ingredient or a dressing ingredient, the use of silver in treating wounds has been around for quite some time. Silver has an array of beneficial effects in promoting healing. Given the potential of silver in the wound care arena, our expert panelists take a closer look at the history of silver in wound care, key indications and their experience with the different modalities that contain silver.

   Q: Historically, how has topical silver been used in wound care?

   A: The panelists note that silver has



Surgical Pearls »

Revisiting A Proven Approach To Severe Ankle Instability

By Jesse Burks, DPM | 7357 reads | 0 comments

   Severe, acute or repetitive chronic inversion ankle sprains can often result in lateral instability of the lateral ankle complex. Although one can treat the vast majority of these conditions conservatively, a significant and unresponsive case may require surgical intervention. Over the course of the past two decades, improved soft tissue anchors and arthroscopic procedures have reduced the necessity of traditional open procedures.

   However, these procedures can still play a vital role in the surgical management of this condition. Naturally, there are numer



News and Trends »

Residents Rumble In Online Competition

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 7481 reads | 0 comments

   For a few Tuesday nights out of the year, podiatric residents across the country will compete with fellow residents in other programs to test their knowledge. The game is not Jeopardy but the Residency Challenge, also known as the Residency Rumble, an academic tournament wherein residents from 76 programs draw upon their knowledge to answer questions on all aspects of podiatry.

   The brainchild of Podiatric Residency Education Services Network (PRESENT), these Tuesday night Web-based programs will occur four times a year, according to PRESENT CEO Alan Sherm



Feature »

Mastering Plantar Heel Pain In Athletes

By Patrick J. Nunan, DPM | 21263 reads | 0 comments

   Plantar heel pain is one of the most common maladies we see in podiatric practice. Patients learn on their first visit that the symptoms usually respond to conservative treatment over a six- to 12-week timeframe, although some individuals may take six to 12 months to be totally pain-free. Athletes may have difficulty accepting the fact that they may have lingering pain over six to 12 months. Not only may the athlete be upset, one may also draw the ire of the coach, athletic trainer, agent or parent.

   When treating an athlete with plantar heel pain, podiatr



Feature »

Growth Factors For Chronic Plantar Fasciitis?

By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, CWS, and Susan E. Erredge, DPM, CWS | 45262 reads | 2 comments

   Plantar fasciitis/heel pain syndrome is the most common condition treated by podiatric foot and ankle specialists in the United States.1 However, the true etiology of plantar fasciitis is still unknown and has been attributed to many different etiological factors. Even the term “plantar fasciitis” is a misnomer as the plantar fascia is really a tendonous aponeurosis and not a fascial layer.2

   It is entirely possible that our whole paradigm for treating plantar fasciitis is based on a false foundation, especially in light of the h