Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • November 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 11
    By Stephen Offutt, DPM, MS and Patrick DeHeer, DPM
    158,647 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/04
       Heel pain is arguably the most common complaint that foot and ankle specialists hear. The majority of these complaints are linked to plantar fasciitis and we all have developed our own unique treatment algorithms for this condition. What happens when we are months into our treatment algorithm and the patient has not had much improvement or a fasciotomy has been performed and the heel pain returns? Is it still plantar fasciitis?    No. In both of these scenarios, we must revert back to our differential diagnoses. While heel pain is commonly caused by plantar ... continue reading

    6,604 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/04
       We certainly agree that the DPM/MD or DPM/DO agree is not for John McCord, DPM (“Should We Add ‘MD’ To Our Credentials?,” page 74, September issue). This forward-looking concept is directed at the future of podiatric medicine, not the past or present. It would not be effective from a time or cost perspective for a practitioner such as Dr. McCord, with 29 years under his belt, to go back to school, pass tests or complete rotations.    The concept of the dual degree is part of an evolutionary process that has elevated a former trade into a bona fide r ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    6,225 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/04
       Type “DPM” or “podiatrist” into an Internet search engine and name after name of established practitioners will come up, leading to Web sites which may have established in order to market their practices. Many podiatrists have been building Web sites to supplement the traditional methods of reaching patients and facilitate the ability of potential patients to reach them. ... continue reading