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  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • November 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 11
    Plantar heel pain among athletes is usually due to overuse and poor biomechanics. However, traumatic causes, such as a baseball player coming down too hard on first base, can occur.
    By Patrick J. Nunan, DPM
    22,093 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Plantar heel pain is one of the most common maladies we see in podiatric practice. Patients learn on their first visit that the symptoms usually respond to conservative treatment over a six- to 12-week timeframe, although some individuals may take six to 12 months to be totally pain-free. Athletes may have difficulty accepting the fact that they may have lingering pain over six to 12 months. Not only may the athlete be upset, one may also draw the ire of the coach, athletic trainer, agent or parent.    When treating an athlete with plantar heel pain, podiatr... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    3,455 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Documenting chart notes has become a pain in the butt. In the good old days, I would handwrite one or two lines after rendering routine foot care. Now I have to dictate a chapter of War and Peace after trimming a few toenails. It is even worse if the patient comes in with a complex foot problem. I have to insert all the bullets to justify the billing code or go to jail for 10 years if the dreaded audit occurs.    I never wanted to buck the system so I hired a transcriptionist (one who can listen, type and keep track of office gossip all at the same ti... continue reading

    5,914 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       We certainly agree that the DPM/MD or DPM/DO agree is not for John McCord, DPM (“Should We Add ‘MD’ To Our Credentials?,” page 74, September issue). This forward-looking concept is directed at the future of podiatric medicine, not the past or present. It would not be effective from a time or cost perspective for a practitioner such as Dr. McCord, with 29 years under his belt, to go back to school, pass tests or complete rotations.    The concept of the dual degree is part of an evolutionary process that has elevated a former trade into a bona fide r... continue reading