Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • November 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 11
    In this photo, surgeons have performed a release of the abductor fascia. One can clearly see the abductor and short flexor muscle belly. The plantar fascia is still intact.
    By Stephen Offutt, DPM, MS and Patrick DeHeer, DPM
    141,211 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Heel pain is arguably the most common complaint that foot and ankle specialists hear. The majority of these complaints are linked to plantar fasciitis and we all have developed our own unique treatment algorithms for this condition. What happens when we are months into our treatment algorithm and the patient has not had much improvement or a fasciotomy has been performed and the heel pain returns? Is it still plantar fasciitis?    No. In both of these scenarios, we must revert back to our differential diagnoses. While heel pain is commonly caused by plantar ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    5,552 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Type “DPM” or “podiatrist” into an Internet search engine and name after name of established practitioners will come up, leading to Web sites which may have established in order to market their practices. Many podiatrists have been building Web sites to supplement the traditional methods of reaching patients and facilitate the ability of potential patients to reach them. ... continue reading
    By Lowell Scott Weil, Jr., DPM, MBA
    39,893 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Last year, I wrote “Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) has a long way to go to prove it has overwhelming medical benefits that are claimed by the manufacturers, but it is still in the early stages of its evolution. With time, it will be necessary to prove these claims through prospective studies.” (See “Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy: Hope Or Hype?,” page 46, November 2003 issue.)    While this article is not intended to prove beyond a statistical doubt that ESWT works, emerging research via prospective placebo-controlled, double-blind studie... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    12,843 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       There were a lot of reports circulating last month about the rise of injuries in the National Football League (NFL). An Indianapolis Star article noted that after four weeks of play, 34 players had been placed on injured reserve, the highest number in six years. As this issue went to press, 346 players are listed on injury reports in the NFL with the injuries ranging from mild to season-ending injuries. (That is an approximate average of 11 injured players per team.) Sixty-three of these injuries (18 percent) are lower-extremity injuries.    When aske... continue reading
    The author prefers making a “hockey stick” incision that begins approximately 6 cm superior and posterior to the distal tip of the fibula and extends to the base of the fifth metatarsal.
    By Jesse Burks, DPM
    7,525 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Severe, acute or repetitive chronic inversion ankle sprains can often result in lateral instability of the lateral ankle complex. Although one can treat the vast majority of these conditions conservatively, a significant and unresponsive case may require surgical intervention. Over the course of the past two decades, improved soft tissue anchors and arthroscopic procedures have reduced the necessity of traditional open procedures.    However, these procedures can still play a vital role in the surgical management of this condition. Naturally, there are numer... continue reading
    Organizers of PRESENT now offer the Residency Challenge, an online competition that allows podiatry residents to compete with other residents across the country.
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    7,629 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       For a few Tuesday nights out of the year, podiatric residents across the country will compete with fellow residents in other programs to test their knowledge. The game is not Jeopardy but the Residency Challenge, also known as the Residency Rumble, an academic tournament wherein residents from 76 programs draw upon their knowledge to answer questions on all aspects of podiatry.    The brainchild of Podiatric Residency Education Services Network (PRESENT), these Tuesday night Web-based programs will occur four times a year, according to PRESENT CEO Alan Sherm... continue reading
    One would pull the yellow platelet poor plasma (as seen above) off the platelet “pellet.” Then you would mix the remaining platelets with a small amount of the platelet poor plasma to create the autologous platelet concentrate (APC+).
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, CWS, and Susan E. Erredge, DPM, CWS
    45,908 reads | 2 comments | 09/03/08
       Plantar fasciitis/heel pain syndrome is the most common condition treated by podiatric foot and ankle specialists in the United States.1 However, the true etiology of plantar fasciitis is still unknown and has been attributed to many different etiological factors. Even the term “plantar fasciitis” is a misnomer as the plantar fascia is really a tendonous aponeurosis and not a fascial layer.2    It is entirely possible that our whole paradigm for treating plantar fasciitis is based on a false foundation, especially in light of the h... continue reading
    Plantar heel pain among athletes is usually due to overuse and poor biomechanics. However, traumatic causes, such as a baseball player coming down too hard on first base, can occur.
    By Patrick J. Nunan, DPM
    21,821 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Plantar heel pain is one of the most common maladies we see in podiatric practice. Patients learn on their first visit that the symptoms usually respond to conservative treatment over a six- to 12-week timeframe, although some individuals may take six to 12 months to be totally pain-free. Athletes may have difficulty accepting the fact that they may have lingering pain over six to 12 months. Not only may the athlete be upset, one may also draw the ire of the coach, athletic trainer, agent or parent.    When treating an athlete with plantar heel pain, podiatr... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    3,388 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       Documenting chart notes has become a pain in the butt. In the good old days, I would handwrite one or two lines after rendering routine foot care. Now I have to dictate a chapter of War and Peace after trimming a few toenails. It is even worse if the patient comes in with a complex foot problem. I have to insert all the bullets to justify the billing code or go to jail for 10 years if the dreaded audit occurs.    I never wanted to buck the system so I hired a transcriptionist (one who can listen, type and keep track of office gossip all at the same ti... continue reading

    5,844 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
       We certainly agree that the DPM/MD or DPM/DO agree is not for John McCord, DPM (“Should We Add ‘MD’ To Our Credentials?,” page 74, September issue). This forward-looking concept is directed at the future of podiatric medicine, not the past or present. It would not be effective from a time or cost perspective for a practitioner such as Dr. McCord, with 29 years under his belt, to go back to school, pass tests or complete rotations.    The concept of the dual degree is part of an evolutionary process that has elevated a former trade into a bona fide r... continue reading