Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • October 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 10
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    1,928 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I set aside a surgical block scheduling day every summer after the middle of June for my yearly crop of juvenile hallux valgus cases. These are usually 14-year-old girls who are between eighth and ninth grade. In most cases, I have seen these patients from the age of eight when they showed the first signs of a bunion deformity. I see the girls once a year during their adolescent growth stage to be sure they are wearing their orthosis and to be sure the deformity is not becoming too severe. I let them know what to expect after surgery and what I expect of them. I have answered most of the diff... continue reading
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM, and Nikiforos Pantelaras, DPM
    389,095 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Consider the following presentations of athletes. A 35-year-old male ballet dancer presents to your office with an antalgic gait. He experienced sudden lateral foot pain in the left foot after making a slightly off-balance landing from a jump. He also complains of left foot weakness and fears that he may not be able to continue to dance ballet. A 14-year-old male basketball player comes in with acute lateral foot pain in his right foot. Currently on crutches, the player says the pain occurred two days ago after he landed on another player’s foot and twisted his ankle. A 22-year-old femal... continue reading
    In this photo, one can see the same wound after three weeks of home care.
    By Ronald A. Sage, DPM
    27,332 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Approximately 15 percent of all patients with diabetes can be expected to develop ulceration in their lifetime, thus putting them at risk for lower extremity amputation. Treatment for infected diabetic foot wounds accounts for one quarter of all diabetic hospital admissions in the United States and Great Britain.1-3 Patient education, proper footgear and regular foot examination can decrease the frequency and severity of ulceration. However, when ulceration does occur, home care may be a cost-effective intervention that can either avoid or shorten hospital admissions in appropriate... continue reading
    By Anthony Poggio, DPM
    51,580 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Given the vast array of dermatological conditions and wounds that we see in our practices, having a strong understanding of commonly used codes for these conditions is essential but not always simple. With this in mind, let’s take a closer look at coding for both common skin conditions such as verrucae and benign skin lesions, as well as coding tips for I&D procedures and wound closure. Standard billing protocols apply for selecting the appropriate E/M level for services for dermatological conditions. Similarly, protocols for billing E/M services with procedures performed on the same day as... continue reading