Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • October 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 10
    This patient developed a large blister from chronic venous insufficiency, a condition that results in blood pooling in the venous system of the lower extremities.
    By Mark Beylin, DPM
    35,659 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Chronic venous insufficiency is a significant disease that affects as much as 25 percent of the population in the United States. It is also a condition commonly treated by podiatric physicians. The condition results in blood pooling in the venous system of the lower extremities (see “A Guide To Normal Venous Anatomy And Physiology below). Venous stasis ulcers are the end stage of chronic venous insufficiency. In order to treat venous stasis ulceration, one must have a clear understanding of the pathophysiology of venous disease. Most of the vein problems that occur are due to increased pr... continue reading
    
The AmeriGel Hydrogel Saturated Gauze Dressing is indicated for pressure ulcers and diabetic ulcers.

    7,592 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    When undergoing treatment for pressure ulcers and infections, your patients may want a dressing they can easily apply once a day. The AmeriGel Hydrogel Saturated Gauze Dressing may be the answer as it is the first antimicrobial hydrogel impregnated gauze, according to the manufacturer AmerX Health Care. The company says the product reduces the bioburden of the wound, facilitating a wound free of debris. The gauze is indicated for use on pressure ulcers (stage I to IV), diabetic skin ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, first- and second-degree burns and post-surgical wounds with dehiscence, acc... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    1,586 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Access to health care coverage will certainly play a role in the upcoming presidential election on November 2. At the end of last year, President Bush signed the Medicare reform bill into law (see “Medicare Reform: Just More Smoke And Mirrors?,” page 14, February issue). Aside from the significantly underestimated cost of the Medicare reforms, people on Medicare are not exactly thrilled with the new law, according to a recently released survey by the non-partisan Kaiser Family Foundation. Nearly half of seniors and non-elderly people with disabilities on Medicare have an unfavorable vie... continue reading
    Many runners who are smaller and lighter prefer a graphite orthotic for fit and control of pronation, according to Timothy Dutra, DPM. He says it is important for the running shoe to be stable in order to get maximum control from the orthotic.
    Clinical Editor: Timothy Dutra, DPM
    17,579 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    When prescribing orthotics for athletes in widely varying types of sports, one must take into consideration both the needs of the athletes and the advantages and disadvantages different types of shoes may offer. With that said, these panelists offer their expertise on orthotic modifications they use to keep their patients on the athletic field. Q: What influence does athletic shoegear have on sport specific orthotics and orthotic modifications? A: For Stephen M. Pribut, DPM, the patient’s specific shoe category and sport have a “major impact” on the orthotics he prescribes. H... continue reading