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  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • October 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 10

    3,535 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/04
    I thoroughly enjoy reading Podiatry Today each month. It is an excellent learning tool for a student. However, upon reading the recent Editor’s Perspective column (see “Are Biomechanics Emphasized Enough In Podiatric Education?” page 18, August issue), I found your survey of the schools to be somewhat misleading. Having just begun my third year at the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, I have already completed two semesters of biomechanics. I have also completed courses in physical therapy, sports medicine, padding and strapping, and have taken several practical biomechanical wo ... continue reading
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM, Donald R. Green, DPM, and Peter Kim, DPM, MS
    14,898 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/04
    Yes, this author says the Lapidus facilitates better first ray stability, allows more intraoperative flexibility and is an easier procedure to perform and fixate. By Babak Baravarian, DPM As the field of foot and ankle surgery has evolved, there has been a dramatic shift in hallux abducto valgus surgery. Currently, the primary treatment goals are ensuring proper alignment of the first metatarsal in both the sagittal, frontal and transverse planes, and facilitating the best long-term outcome. When it comes to realignment of the first ray in all three planes and minimizing the chanc ... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    2,081 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/04
    I set aside a surgical block scheduling day every summer after the middle of June for my yearly crop of juvenile hallux valgus cases. These are usually 14-year-old girls who are between eighth and ninth grade. In most cases, I have seen these patients from the age of eight when they showed the first signs of a bunion deformity. I see the girls once a year during their adolescent growth stage to be sure they are wearing their orthosis and to be sure the deformity is not becoming too severe. I let them know what to expect after surgery and what I expect of them. I have answered most of the diff ... continue reading
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM, and Nikiforos Pantelaras, DPM
    405,432 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/04
    Consider the following presentations of athletes. A 35-year-old male ballet dancer presents to your office with an antalgic gait. He experienced sudden lateral foot pain in the left foot after making a slightly off-balance landing from a jump. He also complains of left foot weakness and fears that he may not be able to continue to dance ballet. A 14-year-old male basketball player comes in with acute lateral foot pain in his right foot. Currently on crutches, the player says the pain occurred two days ago after he landed on another player’s foot and twisted his ankle. A 22-year-old femal ... continue reading