Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • October 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 10
    
The AmeriGel Hydrogel Saturated Gauze Dressing is indicated for pressure ulcers and diabetic ulcers.

    7,566 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    When undergoing treatment for pressure ulcers and infections, your patients may want a dressing they can easily apply once a day. The AmeriGel Hydrogel Saturated Gauze Dressing may be the answer as it is the first antimicrobial hydrogel impregnated gauze, according to the manufacturer AmerX Health Care. The company says the product reduces the bioburden of the wound, facilitating a wound free of debris. The gauze is indicated for use on pressure ulcers (stage I to IV), diabetic skin ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, first- and second-degree burns and post-surgical wounds with dehiscence, acc... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    1,574 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Access to health care coverage will certainly play a role in the upcoming presidential election on November 2. At the end of last year, President Bush signed the Medicare reform bill into law (see “Medicare Reform: Just More Smoke And Mirrors?,” page 14, February issue). Aside from the significantly underestimated cost of the Medicare reforms, people on Medicare are not exactly thrilled with the new law, according to a recently released survey by the non-partisan Kaiser Family Foundation. Nearly half of seniors and non-elderly people with disabilities on Medicare have an unfavorable vie... continue reading
    Many runners who are smaller and lighter prefer a graphite orthotic for fit and control of pronation, according to Timothy Dutra, DPM. He says it is important for the running shoe to be stable in order to get maximum control from the orthotic.
    Clinical Editor: Timothy Dutra, DPM
    17,523 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    When prescribing orthotics for athletes in widely varying types of sports, one must take into consideration both the needs of the athletes and the advantages and disadvantages different types of shoes may offer. With that said, these panelists offer their expertise on orthotic modifications they use to keep their patients on the athletic field. Q: What influence does athletic shoegear have on sport specific orthotics and orthotic modifications? A: For Stephen M. Pribut, DPM, the patient’s specific shoe category and sport have a “major impact” on the orthotics he prescribes. H... continue reading
    By David Edward Marcinko, MBA, CFP, CMP
    9,345 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Supply chain inventory management (SCIM) is essential for doctors who perform a number of similar procedures, those who dispense a fair number of products and surgeons because a medical practice’s profitability will suffer if it has too much or too little inventory of durable medical equipment (DME) on hand. How can a physician determine the proper DME inventory level? One uncommonly used approach is based on the economic order quantity costing (EOQC) method. EOQC is a century-old accounting formula that determines the point at which the combination of order costs and inventory carrying cos... continue reading
    Here is a photo of Luke D. Cicchinelli, DPM, and a five-year-old Nicaraguan girl who was treated for a large lipoma deep to her plantar fascia. Dr. Cicchinelli says participating in mission trips “frames my daily work in a context of value and service bey
    By Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor
    8,525 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
    More and more DPMs are volunteering their time and considerable expertise to travel abroad to help those in need of medical attention. While the concept of missionary work is certainly not new, the number of opportunities to help others across the globe seemingly grows each year. It is not only the patients in other countries who benefit from the gifts these trips provide. Daniel Lee, DPM, AACFAS, remembers going on mission trips as an elementary school student while living in South America. He currently serves on the faculty of the Baja Project for Crippled Children. Since 1976, the Baja ... continue reading
    This patient has excessive hyperhidrosis. Note the small droplets of moisture on the feet in a moccasin distribution.
    By Mary E. Crawford, DPM, FACFAS
    24,032 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Hyperhidrosis is a pathological condition of overperspiration due to excessive secretion by the eccrine sweat glands in amounts greater than required for physiological needs. The disorder often leads to personal embarrassment and professional difficulties in the workplace. It is estimated that Americans alone spend in excess of $500 million annually on products designed to decrease sweating. Patients will often seek medical attention but the enormity of the problem is often disregarded by the medical professional, resulting in despair and isolation for those who suffer from hyperhidrosis. It ... continue reading

    3,305 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I thoroughly enjoy reading Podiatry Today each month. It is an excellent learning tool for a student. However, upon reading the recent Editor’s Perspective column (see “Are Biomechanics Emphasized Enough In Podiatric Education?” page 18, August issue), I found your survey of the schools to be somewhat misleading. Having just begun my third year at the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, I have already completed two semesters of biomechanics. I have also completed courses in physical therapy, sports medicine, padding and strapping, and have taken several practical biomechanical wo... continue reading
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM, Donald R. Green, DPM, and Peter Kim, DPM, MS
    14,055 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Yes, this author says the Lapidus facilitates better first ray stability, allows more intraoperative flexibility and is an easier procedure to perform and fixate. By Babak Baravarian, DPM As the field of foot and ankle surgery has evolved, there has been a dramatic shift in hallux abducto valgus surgery. Currently, the primary treatment goals are ensuring proper alignment of the first metatarsal in both the sagittal, frontal and transverse planes, and facilitating the best long-term outcome. When it comes to realignment of the first ray in all three planes and minimizing the chanc... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    1,927 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I set aside a surgical block scheduling day every summer after the middle of June for my yearly crop of juvenile hallux valgus cases. These are usually 14-year-old girls who are between eighth and ninth grade. In most cases, I have seen these patients from the age of eight when they showed the first signs of a bunion deformity. I see the girls once a year during their adolescent growth stage to be sure they are wearing their orthosis and to be sure the deformity is not becoming too severe. I let them know what to expect after surgery and what I expect of them. I have answered most of the diff... continue reading
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM, and Nikiforos Pantelaras, DPM
    389,034 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Consider the following presentations of athletes. A 35-year-old male ballet dancer presents to your office with an antalgic gait. He experienced sudden lateral foot pain in the left foot after making a slightly off-balance landing from a jump. He also complains of left foot weakness and fears that he may not be able to continue to dance ballet. A 14-year-old male basketball player comes in with acute lateral foot pain in his right foot. Currently on crutches, the player says the pain occurred two days ago after he landed on another player’s foot and twisted his ankle. A 22-year-old femal... continue reading