Volume 17 - Issue 10 - October 2004

Continuing Education »

Treating Venous Stasis Ulcers In The Lower Extremity

By Mark Beylin, DPM | 34286 reads | 0 comments

Chronic venous insufficiency is a significant disease that affects as much as 25 percent of the population in the United States. It is also a condition commonly treated by podiatric physicians. The condition results in blood pooling in the venous system of the lower extremities (see “A Guide To Normal Venous Anatomy And Physiology below). Venous stasis ulcers are the end stage of chronic venous insufficiency.
In order to treat venous stasis ulceration, one must have a clear understanding of the pathophysiology of venous disease. Most of the vein problems that occur are due to increased pr



Editor's Perspective »

Emphasizing Accountability For Seniors On Election Day

By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief | 1479 reads | 0 comments

Access to health care coverage will certainly play a role in the upcoming presidential election on November 2. At the end of last year, President Bush signed the Medicare reform bill into law (see “Medicare Reform: Just More Smoke And Mirrors?,” page 14, February issue). Aside from the significantly underestimated cost of the Medicare reforms, people on Medicare are not exactly thrilled with the new law, according to a recently released survey by the non-partisan Kaiser Family Foundation.
Nearly half of seniors and non-elderly people with disabilities on Medicare have an unfavorable vie



Feature »

Mission Trips: How DPMs Are Making An Impact Worldwide

By Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor | 8169 reads | 1 comments

More and more DPMs are volunteering their time and considerable expertise to travel abroad to help those in need of medical attention. While the concept of missionary work is certainly not new, the number of opportunities to help others across the globe seemingly grows each year. It is not only the patients in other countries who benefit from the gifts these trips provide.
Daniel Lee, DPM, AACFAS, remembers going on mission trips as an elementary school student while living in South America. He currently serves on the faculty of the Baja Project for Crippled Children.
Since 1976, the Baja



Letters »

Readers Share Their Views On Biomechanics Editorial

3179 reads | 0 comments

I thoroughly enjoy reading Podiatry Today each month. It is an excellent learning tool for a student. However, upon reading the recent Editor’s Perspective column (see “Are Biomechanics Emphasized Enough In Podiatric Education?” page 18, August issue), I found your survey of the schools to be somewhat misleading.
Having just begun my third year at the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, I have already completed two semesters of biomechanics. I have also completed courses in physical therapy, sports medicine, padding and strapping, and have taken several practical biomechanical wo



Forum »

Resisting Jealousy When Patients Opt To See Another Doctor

By John H. McCord, DPM | 1833 reads | 0 comments

I set aside a surgical block scheduling day every summer after the middle of June for my yearly crop of juvenile hallux valgus cases. These are usually 14-year-old girls who are between eighth and ninth grade. In most cases, I have seen these patients from the age of eight when they showed the first signs of a bunion deformity.
I see the girls once a year during their adolescent growth stage to be sure they are wearing their orthosis and to be sure the deformity is not becoming too severe. I let them know what to expect after surgery and what I expect of them. I have answered most of the diff



Diabetes Watch »

When Diabetic Foot Ulcers Can Be Managed At Home

By Ronald A. Sage, DPM | 26310 reads | 0 comments

Approximately 15 percent of all patients with diabetes can be expected to develop ulceration in their lifetime, thus putting them at risk for lower extremity amputation. Treatment for infected diabetic foot wounds accounts for one quarter of all diabetic hospital admissions in the United States and Great Britain.1-3 Patient education, proper footgear and regular foot examination can decrease the frequency and severity of ulceration.
However, when ulceration does occur, home care may be a cost-effective intervention that can either avoid or shorten hospital admissions in appropriate



  • « Previous
  •  | Page 1 of 3 | 
  • Next »