Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • October 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 10

    3,253 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I thoroughly enjoy reading Podiatry Today each month. It is an excellent learning tool for a student. However, upon reading the recent Editor’s Perspective column (see “Are Biomechanics Emphasized Enough In Podiatric Education?” page 18, August issue), I found your survey of the schools to be somewhat misleading. Having just begun my third year at the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, I have already completed two semesters of biomechanics. I have also completed courses in physical therapy, sports medicine, padding and strapping, and have taken several practical biomechanical wo... continue reading
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM, Donald R. Green, DPM, and Peter Kim, DPM, MS
    13,884 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Yes, this author says the Lapidus facilitates better first ray stability, allows more intraoperative flexibility and is an easier procedure to perform and fixate. By Babak Baravarian, DPM As the field of foot and ankle surgery has evolved, there has been a dramatic shift in hallux abducto valgus surgery. Currently, the primary treatment goals are ensuring proper alignment of the first metatarsal in both the sagittal, frontal and transverse planes, and facilitating the best long-term outcome. When it comes to realignment of the first ray in all three planes and minimizing the chanc... continue reading
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    1,869 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I set aside a surgical block scheduling day every summer after the middle of June for my yearly crop of juvenile hallux valgus cases. These are usually 14-year-old girls who are between eighth and ninth grade. In most cases, I have seen these patients from the age of eight when they showed the first signs of a bunion deformity. I see the girls once a year during their adolescent growth stage to be sure they are wearing their orthosis and to be sure the deformity is not becoming too severe. I let them know what to expect after surgery and what I expect of them. I have answered most of the diff... continue reading
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM, and Nikiforos Pantelaras, DPM
    386,575 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Consider the following presentations of athletes. A 35-year-old male ballet dancer presents to your office with an antalgic gait. He experienced sudden lateral foot pain in the left foot after making a slightly off-balance landing from a jump. He also complains of left foot weakness and fears that he may not be able to continue to dance ballet. A 14-year-old male basketball player comes in with acute lateral foot pain in his right foot. Currently on crutches, the player says the pain occurred two days ago after he landed on another player’s foot and twisted his ankle. A 22-year-old femal... continue reading
    In this photo, one can see the same wound after three weeks of home care.
    By Ronald A. Sage, DPM
    27,036 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Approximately 15 percent of all patients with diabetes can be expected to develop ulceration in their lifetime, thus putting them at risk for lower extremity amputation. Treatment for infected diabetic foot wounds accounts for one quarter of all diabetic hospital admissions in the United States and Great Britain.1-3 Patient education, proper footgear and regular foot examination can decrease the frequency and severity of ulceration. However, when ulceration does occur, home care may be a cost-effective intervention that can either avoid or shorten hospital admissions in appropriate... continue reading
    By Anthony Poggio, DPM
    51,256 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Given the vast array of dermatological conditions and wounds that we see in our practices, having a strong understanding of commonly used codes for these conditions is essential but not always simple. With this in mind, let’s take a closer look at coding for both common skin conditions such as verrucae and benign skin lesions, as well as coding tips for I&D procedures and wound closure. Standard billing protocols apply for selecting the appropriate E/M level for services for dermatological conditions. Similarly, protocols for billing E/M services with procedures performed on the same day as... continue reading
    Second in a series
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    5,996 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    How does the care of diabetic patients at Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities stack up against care given by professionals in managed care plans? A new study involving over 8,000 people suggests patients with diabetes receive superior care at the VA facilities. The study, which was recently published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, tracked nearly 1,300 patients with diabetes in five VA centers and compared their care to that which was received by 6,900 patients with diabetes in eight managed care health plans. According to the study, 98 percent of the patients with diab... continue reading
    This patient developed a large blister from chronic venous insufficiency, a condition that results in blood pooling in the venous system of the lower extremities.
    By Mark Beylin, DPM
    35,211 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Chronic venous insufficiency is a significant disease that affects as much as 25 percent of the population in the United States. It is also a condition commonly treated by podiatric physicians. The condition results in blood pooling in the venous system of the lower extremities (see “A Guide To Normal Venous Anatomy And Physiology below). Venous stasis ulcers are the end stage of chronic venous insufficiency. In order to treat venous stasis ulceration, one must have a clear understanding of the pathophysiology of venous disease. Most of the vein problems that occur are due to increased pr... continue reading
    
The AmeriGel Hydrogel Saturated Gauze Dressing is indicated for pressure ulcers and diabetic ulcers.

    7,480 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    When undergoing treatment for pressure ulcers and infections, your patients may want a dressing they can easily apply once a day. The AmeriGel Hydrogel Saturated Gauze Dressing may be the answer as it is the first antimicrobial hydrogel impregnated gauze, according to the manufacturer AmerX Health Care. The company says the product reduces the bioburden of the wound, facilitating a wound free of debris. The gauze is indicated for use on pressure ulcers (stage I to IV), diabetic skin ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, first- and second-degree burns and post-surgical wounds with dehiscence, acc... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    1,529 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Access to health care coverage will certainly play a role in the upcoming presidential election on November 2. At the end of last year, President Bush signed the Medicare reform bill into law (see “Medicare Reform: Just More Smoke And Mirrors?,” page 14, February issue). Aside from the significantly underestimated cost of the Medicare reforms, people on Medicare are not exactly thrilled with the new law, according to a recently released survey by the non-partisan Kaiser Family Foundation. Nearly half of seniors and non-elderly people with disabilities on Medicare have an unfavorable vie... continue reading