Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • September 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 9
    The Digital Compression Screw is “easy to install and has a short learning curve,” according to William Hineser, DPM, the Chief of Podiatry at Lutheran Medical Center in Wheat Ridge, Col.
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    3,655 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Although performing digital arthrodesis on the lesser metatarsals with the traditional K-wire is reliable, patients may not be pleased with the prospect of a pin sticking out of their feet for several weeks after the procedure. A new screw offers compression, stability and perhaps an improved likelihood of patients enjoying the convenience of internal fixation. The Digital Compression Screw™ offers patients an alternative which they may find more cosmetically acceptable. William Hineser, DPM, has been using the screw for several months and says it is easy to install and has a sh... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor in Chief
    2,164 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    A few weeks back, I drove up to North Jersey to join the rest of my family in celebrating the first birthday of my niece Madison. My sister Steph tried to make the most of the unwrapping of the gifts but Maddie was way past her naptime and struggled to feign mild disinterest. My other nieces McKenna and Maya, who are three and a half and a year and a half old respectively, were only too eager to step in and open the presents for their cousin. Their eyes lit up and their enthusiasm was in overdrive, no doubt fueled by the sugary rush of the birthday cake. Shortly afterward, I tried to muster... continue reading
    DPM-Aire says its XJ-3000C can rid the air of harmful bacteria and mycotic nail dust.

    5,249 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    With so many people dealing with dry skin and nail diseases, one cannot have too many options for treatment. That is why you may want to consider adding two new products to your armamentarium. Keralac® Lotion is a 35% urea-based moisturizer manufactured by Doak Dermatologics. Offering ingredients of vitamin E, lactic acid and zinc, Keralac Lotion can promote a favorable pH level, which can increase healing and protect against harmful bacteria, according to the company. Available in 7-ounce and 11-ounce bottles, Keralac Lotion has a light texture and patients can spread it eas... continue reading
    If chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is allowed to continue, inflammation will develop (as shown above). According to the author, there is an increasing incidence of CVI with the continued aging of the population.
    By Michael Baker, DPM, CWS
    8,758 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    As foot and ankle surgeons, we are constantly reminded that we are the ultimate champions of diabetic foot care. However, another emerging problem is chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) ulcerations. While it does not have nearly the potential impact of limb loss one may see with complications from the diabetic foot, there is an increasing incidence of CVI with the continued aging of the population. According to current estimates, CVI affects between 0.1 and 0.3 percent of the total population in the United States. The healthcare industry spends $400 million annually on treating CVI. Unlike th... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    4,537 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Podiatrists like David G. Armstrong, DPM, know the value of research in podiatric medical schools. A Professor of Surgery, Assistant Dean and Chair for Research at Dr. William M. Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, Dr. Armstrong says research is part of a “triad of care” along with teaching and patient care. To that end, the podiatric medical program of Scholl College is looking toward the future with its establishment of a new research focus. Dean Terence Albright, DPM, says the school’s merger with the Rosalind Franklin Univ... continue reading
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    12,863 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Assessing and treating infected diabetic foot wounds can be challenging. Providing timely treatment is essential given the potential complications of diabetic foot infections but the rise in antibiotic resistance is a key issue to consider. With this in mind, our expert panelists discuss a variety of issues, ranging from empiric antibiotic selection and MRSA infected wounds to their approach in diagnosing osteomyelitis. Q: What empiric antibiotics do you utilize for the infected neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer? A: Systemic antibiotics are unnecessary unless there is evidence of os... continue reading
    This is a preoperative anteroposterior X-ray of a moderate bunion deformity.
    By Michael M. Cohen, DPM
    13,380 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    In the search to find the perfect osteotomy for treating hallux valgus, podiatrists have developed an extensive surgical armamentarium, which includes modifications, as well as modifications of modifications of procedures, to the point where it has become dizzying. Ultimately, our experiences have led most of us to succumb to the fact that “one size does not fit all” when dealing with this common malady and no osteotomy is completely infallible. We all have our favorites and naturally tend to employ those procedures that we are most comfortable using. Debates and arguments concerning whi... continue reading
    The combination of the two studies (with the Indium-WBC study on the left and the 99m Tc-MDP study on the right) delineates the region of an infectious process within the cuboid bone while simultaneously ruling out the existence of infection elsewhere wit
    By Molly S. Judge, DPM, CNMT, and Nellie L. Kelty, MAS, CNMT
    14,083 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    When a patient with Charcot neuroarthropathy presents with an acutely symptomatic limb, joint or a non-healing wound, the differential diagnosis always includes infection. Bone and joint infections are naturally associated with a high degree of potential morbidity. This potential morbidity is significantly increased when there is a delay in diagnosis or when the diagnosis is missed altogether. Therefore, validating a definitive diagnosis of infection and clarifying when it involves bone is essential to providing appropriate and timely treatment. Nuclear medicine leukocyte imaging (NMLI) allow... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    9,591 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I’ve been too busy during the past 29 years trying to become a good podiatrist to worry about whether I should also be a MD. The old question of whether DPMs should also become MDs has been trotted out recently by another publication. Many of the respected members of our profession believe it would be good for us to have dual degrees. The respect of the medical community is one of the main selling points on the dual degree debate. However, I’m happy being a DPM. I doubt having “MD” attached to my name would make me any happier or generate more respect from my medical colleagues. I al... continue reading
    Here is another view of tinea pedis, which can be complicated by secondary bacterial infection, cellulitis or lymphangitis.
    By Robert G. Smith, DPM, RPh, CPed
    35,366 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    One-third of the 17 million patients with diabetes develop manifestations of the disease that affect their skin.1,2 The cutaneous manifestations and signs of diabetes can heighten the suspicions of the practitioner regarding the diagnosis of these skin conditions. Patients with diabetes who have peripheral sensory neuropathy and impaired circulation are at an increased risk of developing complications from skin and nail conditions like onychomycosis.3 These skin changes of the foot can lead to the formation of a diabetic foot ulcer and potentially limb-threatening infecti... continue reading