Volume 17 - Issue 9 - September 2004

Feature »

Current Concepts In Treating Hallux Valgus

By Michael M. Cohen, DPM | 13081 reads | 0 comments

In the search to find the perfect osteotomy for treating hallux valgus, podiatrists have developed an extensive surgical armamentarium, which includes modifications, as well as modifications of modifications of procedures, to the point where it has become dizzying. Ultimately, our experiences have led most of us to succumb to the fact that “one size does not fit all” when dealing with this common malady and no osteotomy is completely infallible.
We all have our favorites and naturally tend to employ those procedures that we are most comfortable using. Debates and arguments concerning whi



Forum »

Should We Add 'MD' To Our Credentials

By John McCord, DPM | 9179 reads | 0 comments

I’ve been too busy during the past 29 years trying to become a good podiatrist to worry about whether I should also be a MD. The old question of whether DPMs should also become MDs has been trotted out recently by another publication. Many of the respected members of our profession believe it would be good for us to have dual degrees. The respect of the medical community is one of the main selling points on the dual degree debate.
However, I’m happy being a DPM. I doubt having “MD” attached to my name would make me any happier or generate more respect from my medical colleagues. I al



Diagnostic Dilemmas »

When Neurosensory Testing Can Help Pinpoint The Cause Of Heel Pain

By David Soomekh, DPM and Babak Baravarian, DPM | 12193 reads | 0 comments

While there are many different causes of primary heel pain, it is often misdiagnosed as simple plantar fasciitis without the proper diagnostic tools. This is especially true for patients who have recurring symptoms and/or have failed multiple conservative and or surgical treatments. It takes a conscientious clinician to know when to begin thinking of a different diagnosis and a new course of treatment.
This is especially true when it comes to heel pain. Many of the patients who walk into our offices complaining of heel pain have either been told by another doctor they have plantar fasciitis o



Technology In Practice »

Why Patients May Prefer Arthrodesis With A New Screw

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 3578 reads | 0 comments

Although performing digital arthrodesis on the lesser metatarsals with the traditional K-wire is reliable, patients may not be pleased with the prospect of a pin sticking out of their feet for several weeks after the procedure. A new screw offers compression, stability and perhaps an improved likelihood of patients enjoying the convenience of internal fixation.
The Digital Compression Screw offers patients an alternative which they may find more cosmetically acceptable. William Hineser, DPM, has been using the screw for several months and says it is easy to install and has a sh



New Products »

Restore Your Patients' Nails

5103 reads | 0 comments

With so many people dealing with dry skin and nail diseases, one cannot have too many options for treatment.
That is why you may want to consider adding two new products to your armamentarium. Keralac® Lotion is a 35% urea-based moisturizer manufactured by Doak Dermatologics. Offering ingredients of vitamin E, lactic acid and zinc, Keralac Lotion can promote a favorable pH level, which can increase healing and protect against harmful bacteria, according to the company.

Available in 7-ounce and 11-ounce bottles, Keralac Lotion has a light texture and patients can spread it eas



Surgical Pearls »

Current Options In Treating Chronic Venous Ulcers

By Michael Baker, DPM, CWS | 8498 reads | 0 comments

As foot and ankle surgeons, we are constantly reminded that we are the ultimate champions of diabetic foot care. However, another emerging problem is chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) ulcerations. While it does not have nearly the potential impact of limb loss one may see with complications from the diabetic foot, there is an increasing incidence of CVI with the continued aging of the population.
According to current estimates, CVI affects between 0.1 and 0.3 percent of the total population in the United States. The healthcare industry spends $400 million annually on treating CVI. Unlike th



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