Volume 17 - Issue 8 - August 2004

Technology In Practice »

Providing Relief For Dry And Cracked Skin On The Diabetic Foot

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 4731 reads | 0 comments

Patients with diabetes may face a broad range of potential complications, including cracked and dry skin on their feet. Given the increasing prevalence of diabetes, it is more important than ever to have cost-effective options to address this uncomfortable facet of the disease. What can you turn to in order to provide some relief for those who have cracked and dry skin on their feet?
The Lantiseptic® line of products may be your answer. Available in different sizes and for a range of problems, Lantiseptic Skin Protectant, Lantiseptic Therapeutic Cream and Lantiseptic All Body Wash



News and Trends »

Studies Say Diabetes Abounds In Obese Children But Awareness Is Lacking

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 3629 reads | 0 comments

With the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes in children, are parents and children getting the message that being overweight can lead to the disease? Several new studies suggest otherwise, finding rising health problems in obese children and concluding that childhood obesity can go unnoticed by both parents and children.
Although Eric Espensen, DPM, has not seen an increased number of children who have type 2 diabetes, he notes that Minh Mach, MD, an endocrinologist colleague, has seen such an increase and lectures on the rising incidence of type 2 diabetes in youth. Dr. Espensen urges p



Feature »

Diagnosing Malignant Bone Tumors In The Lower Extremity

By Bradley W. Bakotic, DPM, DO | 17977 reads | 1 comments

Many lesions of bone that arise with relative frequency in the feet are seen less commonly in alternate locations. Similarly, there are a host of trends with regard to the biology of bone tumors that are unique to the distal extremities, particularly the feet. With that said, let’s review the most common malignant tumors of the bones of the feet and key clinical features that can aid in arriving at the most appropriate diagnosis and subsequent treatment.
While it is far from the most common malignant tumor of the skeletal system at large, Ewing’s sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (P



Point-Counterpoint »

Early Weightbearing After Lapidus: Is It Possible?

By Neal Blitz, DPM, and Patrick A. DeHeer, DPM | 15393 reads | 0 comments

Yes, Neal Blitz, DPM, says it is possible in certain cases. In assessing the literature and his own experience, he emphasizes proper patient selection and key surgical tips for facilitating optimal outcomes.

The Lapidus arthrodesis is an excellent procedure to correct metatarsus primus adductus. The procedure, which allows one to realign and stabilize the first metatarsal at the apex of the deformity, was first described by Albrecht in 1911 and subsequently popularized by Lapidus.1-4 Yet it was later abandoned by many surgeons because of the high nonunion rate and postoperative c



Feature »

HIPAA Compliance: Do You Make The Grade?

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 6107 reads | 0 comments

The clock is ticking. In another step of a process which began in 1996, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have set a deadline of April 21, 2005 for compliance with the security standards of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Is your practice ready to meet the deadline?
The voluminous data on HIPAA compliance lays out broad guidelines for maintaining security. As the final rule from the Federal Register states, healthcare organizations must “ensure the confidentiality, integrity and availability of all electronically protected health informat



Continuing Education »

Using Serologic Screening To Identify And Monitor At-Risk Charcot Patients

By Molly S. Judge, DPM | 13787 reads | 0 comments

Charcot neuroarthropathy and the complications of longstanding diabetes are perhaps the greatest challenge for the foot and ankle specialist. These conditions are of principal concern given the limb threatening consequences when a diagnosis of Charcot foot is delayed or missed completely. Though there is no modern revelation in identifying the Charcot foot, there has been rejuvenated interest behind the continued study of this neuropathic entity.1-22 Subsequently, the slow rise in the number of reported cases of Charcot neuroarthropathy is likely due more to increased awareness