Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
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  • July 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 7
    By John S. Steinberg, DPM, Khurram Khan, DPM, and Jonah Mullens
    20,148 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    In clinical practice, two of the most common types of infected wounds podiatrists see are ulcerations and postoperative incision sites. In order to resolve these infections and ultimately close these wounds, one must have a strong understanding of the etiology of infected ulcerations and post-op infections, how to assess these wounds and how to select appropriate treatment options. ... continue reading
    Here one can see moderate hallux varus.
    By Justin Franson, DPM, and Babak Baravarian, DPM
    19,140 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Chances are, you have seen patients present to your office with pain after undergoing a bunion surgery, which you may or may not have performed. If you were the operating surgeon, it is easy enough to research the specific procedure that you performed. However, in many cases of hallux varus complications, the patients wind up in another surgeon’s office for reconstruction. Obtaining all the prior operative and post-op information will aid in tailoring the revisional surgery. With this in mind, let’s consider the following case. A 55-year-old female patient returns to the office for a fol... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    1,892 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Consider the dizzying array of choices one must make when a patient presents with a non-healing wound. In some cases, determining the etiology can be a daunting challenge. In their guest column for Diabetes Watch, Damieon Brown, DPM, and Javier La Fontaine, DPM, discuss the difficulties of detecting diabetic autonomic neuropathy and provide an illuminating case study that reflects the subsequent challenges of treating these patients for chronic wounds (see page 20). Within this month’s continuing education article, “How To Detect And Treat Infected Wounds” (see page 68), John S. Stei... continue reading
    A new instructional CD guides you in using Ethyl Chloride® Topical Anesthetic to minimize injection pain, according to Gebauer.

    3,187 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    When treating diabetic patients who have neuropathic ulcers, it can be challenging to apply a wound care ointment with a wooden applicator or cotton swab due to pain tolerance issues. However, a new spray version of Panafil® may be able to address these concerns. Healthpoint, the manufacturer of Panafil Spray, says the spray is light so it doesn’t hurt a sensitive wound bed and facilitates easier access with tough to reach areas of irregularly-shaped wounds. The company also emphasizes that using the spray minimizes the potential for cross-contamination, a significant benefi... continue reading