Volume 17 - Issue 7 - July 2004

Continuing Education »

How To Detect And Treat Infected Wounds

By John S. Steinberg, DPM, Khurram Khan, DPM, and Jonah Mullens | 19373 reads | 0 comments

In clinical practice, two of the most common types of infected wounds podiatrists see are ulcerations and postoperative incision sites. In order to resolve these infections and ultimately close these wounds, one must have a strong understanding of the etiology of infected ulcerations and post-op infections, how to assess these wounds and how to select appropriate treatment options.



Editor's Perspective »

Making The Right Call In Wound Healing

By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief | 1757 reads | 0 comments

Consider the dizzying array of choices one must make when a patient presents with a non-healing wound. In some cases, determining the etiology can be a daunting challenge. In their guest column for Diabetes Watch, Damieon Brown, DPM, and Javier La Fontaine, DPM, discuss the difficulties of detecting diabetic autonomic neuropathy and provide an illuminating case study that reflects the subsequent challenges of treating these patients for chronic wounds (see page 20).
Within this month’s continuing education article, “How To Detect And Treat Infected Wounds” (see page 68), John S. Stei



Feature »

What You Should Know About Nutrition And Wound Healing

By Patricia Abu-Rumman, DPM, and Robert A. Menzies, BSc(Hons), MChS, SRCh | 16014 reads | 0 comments

Wound healing is a complex process that depends upon the delicate balance of physical and spiritual well-being of the individual. In order to maintain this required balance for wound healing, clinicians must be aware of and evaluate five major conditions including: adequate perfusion, decreased bacterial load, protection from mechanical stress, sufficient nutrition and the patient’s psychosocial status.
While one can evaluate the first three conditions through clinical examination techniques, laboratory assays and special studies, the nutritional status and psychosocial status of the patie



Letters »

Raising Questions About ESWT In Heel Pain Article

5347 reads | 0 comments

First, I’d like to say that the article on adult-acquired flatfoot (AAF) was insightful and thorough (see the cover story “A New Approach To Adult-Acquired Flatfoot,” pg. 32, May issue). It is now my reference on AAF. However, I found that the heel pain article left questions unanswered (see “Conquering Conservative Care For Heel Pain,” pg. 48, May issue). I wonder why James Losito, DPM, offered his comments on Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy (ESWT) while having very limited knowledge of ESWT.

Out of the three methods of generating shockwave, Dr. Losito only describes one. By his



Forum »

How To Succeed At Conflict Resolution Without A MBA

By John McCord, DPM | 2689 reads | 0 comments

I never enjoyed the yearly planning session with my undergraduate advisor at the University of Washington. It was the beginning of my senior year and the advisor was disturbed at my lack of a life plan. He noted I had taken a lot of science courses and had done well. I explained science to me was like reading a cookbook and my roommates were pre-med. No, I had not considered applying to medical school. I admitted dodging the draft was my main interest in college.
My advisor suggested a business class called Conflict Resolution. It was a graduate level course and didn’t interest me at all.



Diabetes Watch »

Detecting And Treating Patients With Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

By Damieon Brown, DPM and Javier La Fontaine, DPM | 13450 reads | 0 comments

Autonomic neuropathy may significantly affect the quality of life of patients with diabetes. Unfortunately, despite the common prevalence of this condition in this population, autonomic neuropathy is one of the least understood and recognized complications of diabetes. Not only is there a cloudy picture in regard to the pathogenesis of the condition, there are various clinical manifestations with no degree of consistency in which they may occur.
With this in mind, let’s take a closer look at this potentially serious complication among people with diabetes.
Autonomic neuropathy generally in



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