Volume 17 - Issue 7 - July 2004

Feature »

How To Assess And Manage Burn Injuries Of The Foot

By Alan J. Cantor, DPM, CWS, and Keith Burger, PA-C | 19956 reads | 0 comments

Burn injuries are among the most devastating wounds a clinician may be asked to treat. Burn medicine is a critical care, specialized field of medicine, surgery and rehabilitation, all of which are intertwined and interdependent for successful outcomes. Precise awareness of modern wound management, skin function, infectious disease issues and crisis decision capabilities are hallmarks of burn injury care.
Significantly, as more podiatrists become experts at wound management, many DPMs will find themselves becoming an integral part of the modern burn team.
In the United States, there are appr



Feature »

Assessing The Role And Impact Of Enzymatic Debridement

By Jonathan Moore, DPM and Pamela Jensen, DPM | 17565 reads | 0 comments

Over the last few decades, many technological advances have occurred in the field of wound healing, resulting in a variety of wound dressings, ointments, creams, debriding agents, growth factors and bioengineered skin grafts. While one does not have to be a wound care specialist to treat complicated wounds, it is important to have a basic knowledge of normal wound healing and the etiology of a chronic or nonhealing wound, an understanding of the wound products available, and the ability to adapt to an ever-changing wound.
Chronic, delayed or non-healing wounds demonstrate an impaired response



Feature »

External Fixation: Is It The Answer For Diabetic Limb Salvage?

By Guy R. Pupp, DPM, and Peter M. Wilusz, DPM | 8685 reads | 0 comments

There has been a six-fold increase in diabetes mellitus over the last four decades in the United States.1 Indeed, 798,000 new diabetic patients are diagnosed each year in the U.S.2,3 The statistics are particularly disturbing when it comes to lower extremity amputation among people with diabetes.
Lower extremity amputation among the diabetic population increased from 67,000 in 1994 to 140,000 in 2000.4 While amputation in the diabetic population is a viable option in the presence of significant peripheral arterial disease and gangrene, life expectancy after m



Continuing Education »

How To Detect And Treat Infected Wounds

By John S. Steinberg, DPM, Khurram Khan, DPM, and Jonah Mullens | 19538 reads | 0 comments

In clinical practice, two of the most common types of infected wounds podiatrists see are ulcerations and postoperative incision sites. In order to resolve these infections and ultimately close these wounds, one must have a strong understanding of the etiology of infected ulcerations and post-op infections, how to assess these wounds and how to select appropriate treatment options.



Editor's Perspective »

Making The Right Call In Wound Healing

By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief | 1788 reads | 0 comments

Consider the dizzying array of choices one must make when a patient presents with a non-healing wound. In some cases, determining the etiology can be a daunting challenge. In their guest column for Diabetes Watch, Damieon Brown, DPM, and Javier La Fontaine, DPM, discuss the difficulties of detecting diabetic autonomic neuropathy and provide an illuminating case study that reflects the subsequent challenges of treating these patients for chronic wounds (see page 20).
Within this month’s continuing education article, “How To Detect And Treat Infected Wounds” (see page 68), John S. Stei



Feature »

What You Should Know About Nutrition And Wound Healing

By Patricia Abu-Rumman, DPM, and Robert A. Menzies, BSc(Hons), MChS, SRCh | 16101 reads | 0 comments

Wound healing is a complex process that depends upon the delicate balance of physical and spiritual well-being of the individual. In order to maintain this required balance for wound healing, clinicians must be aware of and evaluate five major conditions including: adequate perfusion, decreased bacterial load, protection from mechanical stress, sufficient nutrition and the patient’s psychosocial status.
While one can evaluate the first three conditions through clinical examination techniques, laboratory assays and special studies, the nutritional status and psychosocial status of the patie



  • « Previous
  •  | Page 1 of 3 | 
  • Next »