Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • July 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 7
    Using a hemostat, one may see the bulbous, white and glistening nerve mass and dissect it.
    By Lynnelle R. Gabriel, DPM
    34,760 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Treating a Morton’s neuroma can be a delicate operation. There is currently much discussion and controversy over whether to remove an intermetatarsal neuroma or leave the nerve intact and release the deep transverse intermetatarsal ligament via a minimally invasive nerve decompression (MIND). There have not been enough studies to sway the majority of surgeons to leave the intermetatarsal neuroma and only release the ligament. Although I believe this is truly an entrapment of the nerve, I have found removing the neuroma has been quite successful. The clinical signs and symptoms of a neurom... continue reading
    Changes in the skin and its appendages can indicate a nutrient deficit. Note the dry skin.
    By Patricia Abu-Rumman, DPM, and Robert A. Menzies, BSc(Hons), MChS, SRCh
    16,473 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Wound healing is a complex process that depends upon the delicate balance of physical and spiritual well-being of the individual. In order to maintain this required balance for wound healing, clinicians must be aware of and evaluate five major conditions including: adequate perfusion, decreased bacterial load, protection from mechanical stress, sufficient nutrition and the patient’s psychosocial status. While one can evaluate the first three conditions through clinical examination techniques, laboratory assays and special studies, the nutritional status and psychosocial status of the patie... continue reading
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    10,002 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Offloading diabetic neuropathic ulcers comes with a unique set of treatment challenges. Some consider total contact casting the gold standard but whether it’s practical in a busy practice is highly debatable. Still, how can one arrive at a solution that will enhance patient compliance? With these issues in mind, our expert panelists share their thoughts and experiences with this topic. Q: How do you initially offload the plantar diabetic neuropathic ulcer? A: Lawrence G. Karlock, DPM, says he is initially aggressive when it comes to offloading the plantar neuropathic ulceration. ... continue reading

    5,514 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    First, I’d like to say that the article on adult-acquired flatfoot (AAF) was insightful and thorough (see the cover story “A New Approach To Adult-Acquired Flatfoot,” pg. 32, May issue). It is now my reference on AAF. However, I found that the heel pain article left questions unanswered (see “Conquering Conservative Care For Heel Pain,” pg. 48, May issue). I wonder why James Losito, DPM, offered his comments on Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy (ESWT) while having very limited knowledge of ESWT. Out of the three methods of generating shockwave, Dr. Losito only describes one. By his... continue reading
    A 53-year-old female sustained a scald burn. As you can see, the plantar aspect was unaffected due to its glabrous anatomy, which makes plantar burns less common.
    By Alan J. Cantor, DPM, CWS, and Keith Burger, PA-C
    20,662 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Burn injuries are among the most devastating wounds a clinician may be asked to treat. Burn medicine is a critical care, specialized field of medicine, surgery and rehabilitation, all of which are intertwined and interdependent for successful outcomes. Precise awareness of modern wound management, skin function, infectious disease issues and crisis decision capabilities are hallmarks of burn injury care. Significantly, as more podiatrists become experts at wound management, many DPMs will find themselves becoming an integral part of the modern burn team. In the United States, there are appr... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    2,784 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I never enjoyed the yearly planning session with my undergraduate advisor at the University of Washington. It was the beginning of my senior year and the advisor was disturbed at my lack of a life plan. He noted I had taken a lot of science courses and had done well. I explained science to me was like reading a cookbook and my roommates were pre-med. No, I had not considered applying to medical school. I admitted dodging the draft was my main interest in college. My advisor suggested a business class called Conflict Resolution. It was a graduate level course and didn’t interest me at all. ... continue reading
    By Jonathan Moore, DPM and Pamela Jensen, DPM
    17,919 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Over the last few decades, many technological advances have occurred in the field of wound healing, resulting in a variety of wound dressings, ointments, creams, debriding agents, growth factors and bioengineered skin grafts. While one does not have to be a wound care specialist to treat complicated wounds, it is important to have a basic knowledge of normal wound healing and the etiology of a chronic or nonhealing wound, an understanding of the wound products available, and the ability to adapt to an ever-changing wound. Chronic, delayed or non-healing wounds demonstrate an impaired response... continue reading
    A 56-year-old Hispanic female with diabetes underwent an open partial first ray amputation and lower extremity angioplasties. No response was noticed three days after surgery even with good wound care.
    By Damieon Brown, DPM and Javier La Fontaine, DPM
    13,817 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Autonomic neuropathy may significantly affect the quality of life of patients with diabetes. Unfortunately, despite the common prevalence of this condition in this population, autonomic neuropathy is one of the least understood and recognized complications of diabetes. Not only is there a cloudy picture in regard to the pathogenesis of the condition, there are various clinical manifestations with no degree of consistency in which they may occur. With this in mind, let’s take a closer look at this potentially serious complication among people with diabetes. Autonomic neuropathy generally in... continue reading
    A 59-year-old female with type 2 diabetes presented with ankle instability secondary to Charcot neuroarthropathy of nine months duration. Note the severe destruction of the talus in her radiograph above.
    By Guy R. Pupp, DPM, and Peter M. Wilusz, DPM
    8,940 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    There has been a six-fold increase in diabetes mellitus over the last four decades in the United States.1 Indeed, 798,000 new diabetic patients are diagnosed each year in the U.S.2,3 The statistics are particularly disturbing when it comes to lower extremity amputation among people with diabetes. Lower extremity amputation among the diabetic population increased from 67,000 in 1994 to 140,000 in 2000.4 While amputation in the diabetic population is a viable option in the presence of significant peripheral arterial disease and gangrene, life expectancy after m... continue reading
    Here one can see moderate hallux varus.
    By Justin Franson, DPM, and Babak Baravarian, DPM
    19,145 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Chances are, you have seen patients present to your office with pain after undergoing a bunion surgery, which you may or may not have performed. If you were the operating surgeon, it is easy enough to research the specific procedure that you performed. However, in many cases of hallux varus complications, the patients wind up in another surgeon’s office for reconstruction. Obtaining all the prior operative and post-op information will aid in tailoring the revisional surgery. With this in mind, let’s consider the following case. A 55-year-old female patient returns to the office for a fol... continue reading