Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • June 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 6
    Here one can see an instant total contact cast wrapped with either coban or plaster. According to the authors, this technique helps facilitate patient compliance by rapidly converting a removable cast walker into one that is less easily removed. (Photo co
    By Jason Pollard, DPM, and Richard Stess, DPM
    37,156 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Charcot neuroarthropathy is a progressive deterioration of a joint characterized by a loss of sensation. When left untreated, this condition can lead to pathological fractures, joint dislocation/subluxation and deformity. This condition reportedly affects an estimated 0.8 percent to 7.5 percent of people with diabetes. The prevalence of this condition increases dramatically among patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy, ranging from 29 to 35 percent in this specific population.1,2 However, this disorder is not limited to patients with diabetes as it can also afflict patien... continue reading
    By Gary L. Dockery, DPM, FACFAS
    11,579 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Serious foot infections result from a combination of factors including disease, injury, neuropathy, vascular impairment and insufficient wound healing. Diabetic patients, in particular, are at high risk of developing serious complications in lower extremities that can lead to amputation. Of the estimated 17 million people who have Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, almost 15 percent will undergo lower extremity amputation during their lifetime.1,2 Approximately 80 percent of diabetes-related amputations are preceded by chronic foot ulcers.3-5 Many chronic foot ulcers in diabet... continue reading
    By Robert Smith, Contributing Editor
    14,707 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Doc Baker had it easy. As the only physician in Walnut Grove, he had the market cornered. Anyone who lived in or visited the fictional center of the Little House On The Prairie television series (whether it was Laura Ingalls, Nellie Olsen or some unfortunate guest star like Ernest Borgnine) had to go to Doc Baker for their ills. Everything was curable and everyone paid at the end of the visit. If Walnut Grove existed today, it would likely have a variety of specialists (including a couple of podiatrists) and there would be an insurance agency (or a dozen) processing claims and graduall... continue reading