Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • June 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 6
    This is an example of motor involvement with dystonia of the digits.
The patient is a 48-year-old female, who has CRPS type I that has gone untreated for five years.
    Moderator: Michael Downey, DPM; Panelists: Jeffrey C. Christensen, DPM, Lawrence Fallat, DPM, Robert L. Goldstucker, Esq., Nelson Hendler, MD, MS, and Steven Mandel, MD
    26,145 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) has emerged as one of the more controversial topics in podiatry in recent years. Not only are there no clear-cut answers in regard to the etiology of the condition, standard terminology for describing the condition has been equally elusive in the past. With this in mind, expert panelists discuss various issues in diagnosing and treating this condition. Q: We have all heard different terms used for this condition, including reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), causalgia and Sudek’s Atrophy. What is the current ... continue reading

    64,964 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Cryogenic neuroablation is a safe, minimally invasive option that is less painful than alcohol injections and may facilitate a reduced risk of stump neuromas, according to this author. By Lawrence Fallat, DPM Morton’s neuroma (perineural fibroma) is a common painful forefoot disorder that can present treatment challenges to all podiatric physicians. The common digital nerves, usually in the second and third intermetatarsal spaces, become enlarged in the area of the deep transverse metatarsal ligament and subsequently cause pain in the ball of the foot with cramping, pain and num... continue reading
    By Howard Rosenbaum, DPM
    6,244 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Congratulations to John McCord, DPM. The reaction from several sources to his recent Forum column on “gimmicks” (“Thinking Twice About Revenue Enhancement Opportunities,” page 82 in the April issue) has generated enough emotion to compel my response. In general, Dr McCord’s view of the podiatry profession is discouraging to podiatrists who desire to enhance their knowledge and skills. Furthermore, his portrayal of diagnostic ultrasound is inaccurate and misleading. Actually, I am disappointed that a Podiatry Today Editorial Advisory Board member believes that a podiatrist is ... continue reading
    Here one can see an instant total contact cast wrapped with either coban or plaster. According to the authors, this technique helps facilitate patient compliance by rapidly converting a removable cast walker into one that is less easily removed. (Photo co
    By Jason Pollard, DPM, and Richard Stess, DPM
    37,646 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Charcot neuroarthropathy is a progressive deterioration of a joint characterized by a loss of sensation. When left untreated, this condition can lead to pathological fractures, joint dislocation/subluxation and deformity. This condition reportedly affects an estimated 0.8 percent to 7.5 percent of people with diabetes. The prevalence of this condition increases dramatically among patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy, ranging from 29 to 35 percent in this specific population.1,2 However, this disorder is not limited to patients with diabetes as it can also afflict patien... continue reading
    By Gary L. Dockery, DPM, FACFAS
    11,656 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Serious foot infections result from a combination of factors including disease, injury, neuropathy, vascular impairment and insufficient wound healing. Diabetic patients, in particular, are at high risk of developing serious complications in lower extremities that can lead to amputation. Of the estimated 17 million people who have Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, almost 15 percent will undergo lower extremity amputation during their lifetime.1,2 Approximately 80 percent of diabetes-related amputations are preceded by chronic foot ulcers.3-5 Many chronic foot ulcers in diabet... continue reading
    By Robert Smith, Contributing Editor
    14,830 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Doc Baker had it easy. As the only physician in Walnut Grove, he had the market cornered. Anyone who lived in or visited the fictional center of the Little House On The Prairie television series (whether it was Laura Ingalls, Nellie Olsen or some unfortunate guest star like Ernest Borgnine) had to go to Doc Baker for their ills. Everything was curable and everyone paid at the end of the visit. If Walnut Grove existed today, it would likely have a variety of specialists (including a couple of podiatrists) and there would be an insurance agency (or a dozen) processing claims and graduall... continue reading
    Direct milled polypropylene (as seen above) and vacuum formed polypropylene are “the most effective and versatile materials for functional orthoses for athletes,” notes Larry Huppin, DPM.
    Guest Clinical Editor: Nicholas Romansky, DPM
    13,758 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    There is no shortage of issues to consider when you are prescribing custom orthotics for different types of patients, whether it’s knowing what to look for during the biomechanical exam or understanding the keys to proper casting. With these things in mind, our expert panelists explore various issues from prescribing orthotics for athletes to altering orthotics in case of improper fit. Q: What keys do you look for in your biomechanical exam? A: Patrick Nunan, DPM, starts his biomechanical exam by having the patient sit on an exam table while he evaluates the joints’ range of mot... continue reading
    One can see an obvious LLD in this photo. When these patients stand with their legs together,  one leg is forced to bend in order to compensate for the difference in lengths. However, most LLDs are not as obvious.
    By David Levine, DPM, CPed
    52,690 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Small, seemingly inconsequential leg length differences (LLD) can lead to symptomatic biomechanical asymmetry. Without careful examination, subtle LLDs can go undetected as can the etiology of the pathology they create. Differences in leg lengths vary from the subtle to the obvious. Once one identifies LLD, practitioners also need to know how to treat it. Understanding the patient’s lifestyle and activity level will help you determine when to address his or her LLD. Whether it is a difference in appearance of the two feet or a difference in function, asymmetry is often obvious if we know... continue reading
    By Steven Peltz, CHBC
    10,421 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    When you decide to hire a new podiatrist for your practice, one of the most important decisions you will face is deciding how much to pay your new hire. Ideally, you want to pay a base salary and offer an incentive that encourages the new podiatrist to work hard, pay for him- or herself quickly and then participate in the collections above his or her costs to the practice. Potential employees are looking for compensation that will allow for a reasonable lifestyle along with loan payments. The challenge is how to take both of these concepts and create an agreement that is acceptable to each pa... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    2,213 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    There was a great moment during the first International Foot and Ankle Congress (IFAC) meeting in New Orleans, where podiatrists and orthopedic surgeons convened to share their knowledge and experience. During his lecture on performing an FHL tendon transfer, Pascal Rippstein, MD, discussed the difficulty of trying to pass a tendon through a drill hole. Using motion photography, Dr. Rippstein, an orthopedic surgeon from Zurich, Switzerland, went back and forth with the images to convey the frustration of this experience. There was a roar of laughter from the audience and applause. It was in... continue reading