Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • May 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 5
    A new study reveals that diabetic patients who wear insoles with therapeutic shoes, such as this one, are less likely to develop lesions and have less foot pressure than those wearing their own footwear.
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    9,681 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    While there has been a plethora of studies in recent years that have tackled therapeutic footwear for people with diabetes, a new study reveals a dramatically lower rate of foot ulcers among those who wear therapeutic footwear and insoles. The study, which was published recently in Diabetes Care, found that 33 percent of patients who wore their own shoes had new foot lesions while approximately four percent of those who wore therapeutic footwear and insoles experienced new ulcers. The study, which was conducted in India, tracked 241 patients with diabetes who either had previous foot u... continue reading
    Here is a lateral radiograph of a failed talonavicular arthrodesis.
    By Jesse B. Burks, DPM
    11,090 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Isolated fusions of the rearfoot have long been a choice of many podiatric foot and ankle surgeons for conditions such as coalitions, arthrosis and symptomatic flatfoot deformities. Persuasive arguments can be made for fusion of the calcaneocuboid, subtalar or talonavicular joints, especially when it comes to deformities such as the symptomatic flatfoot. While each of these procedures provide certain benefits for surgeons, they can present their own unique intraoperative and postoperative challenges as well. With this in mind, I would like to share my thoughts as to why my talonavicular (TN) ... continue reading