Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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    Brian McCurdy
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    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
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  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • May 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 5
    By Jesse B. Burks, DPM
    11,476 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/04
    Isolated fusions of the rearfoot have long been a choice of many podiatric foot and ankle surgeons for conditions such as coalitions, arthrosis and symptomatic flatfoot deformities. Persuasive arguments can be made for fusion of the calcaneocuboid, subtalar or talonavicular joints, especially when it comes to deformities such as the symptomatic flatfoot. While each of these procedures provide certain benefits for surgeons, they can present their own unique intraoperative and postoperative challenges as well. With this in mind, I would like to share my thoughts as to why my talonavicular (TN) ... continue reading
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    6,656 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/04
    Given the potentially serious nature of venous ulcers in the lower extremity, our expert panelists take a closer look at key risk factors and share their treatment approaches to this condition. Drawing from their experience, they also discuss topical treatments, the use of bioengineered skin substitutes and surgical procedures. Q: What risk factors predispose patients to the development of lower extremity venous ulcers? A: Mark Hirko, MD, and Lawrence Karlock, DPM, agree that risks include prior deep venous thromboses (DVT), morbid obesity, lower extremity trauma and chronic venous ... continue reading
    By David Edward Marcinko, MBA, CFP©, CMP©
    7,034 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/04
    Whether they are due from patients, insurance companies, HMOs, Medicare, Medicaid or other third-party payers, accounts receivable (A/R) are the lifeblood of any medical practice. Unfortunately, it is not unusual for a podiatry practice to wait six, nine, 12 months or longer for payment. In fact, older A/R are often written off or charged back as bad debt expenses and never collected at all. Also keep in mind that A/R are often the biggest practice asset to protect against creditors or adverse legal judgements. A judgement creditor pursuing you for a claim may pursue the assets of your prac ... continue reading
    By Douglas H. Richie Jr., DPM
    46,874 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/04
    Ask experienced DPMs what pathology has seen the most dramatic increase in prevalence over the last 20 years and, aside from plantar heel pain, they will tell you it is posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD). Currently, most authorities have dropped the description PTTD in favor of “adult-acquired flatfoot.” This is due to increased recognition of the fact that a rupture or attenuation of the posterior tibial tendon cannot itself lead to the deformity and disability that one sees in older adults with progressive flatfoot deformity. Significant ligamentous rupture occurs as the flatfoo ... continue reading
    By James M. Losito, DPM
    19,565 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/04
    Heel pain is certainly one of the most ubiquitous complaints among our patients. Plantar heel pain is by far the most common location with proximal plantar fasciitis (heel spur syndrome) accounting for the majority of cases. Proximal plantar fasciitis, otherwise referred to as heel spur syndrome, is common in any podiatric practice and is certainly the most frequently encountered etiology of heel pain. Plantar fasciitis has been reported to comprise up to 10 percent of all foot and ankle injuries. The clinical presentation consists of insidious onset plantar or plantar/medial heel pain. In m ... continue reading
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    28,247 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/04
    A patient presents to the office with a history of an ankle sprain that occurred eight months ago. The patient was playing tennis and rolled his ankle during the match. He had to immediately stop and felt a snap in the lateral ankle. For the next week, he wore a lace-up ankle brace and iced the ankle. He was able to walk on the ankle the day after the injury but had continued pain in the ankle that did not resolve for one month. At the one-month point, his doctor suggested the ankle was painful from the sprain and suggested a course of physical therapy. The patient performed all of the phy ... continue reading
    By Robert Salk, DPM, Kirk Grogan, DPM, Thomas Chang, DPM, and Walter D’Costa, DPM
    149,461 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/04
    Plantar warts are generally benign and usually self-limiting lesions, but are often painful and can be quite debilitating. The incidence of plantar warts is 1 to 2 percent in the general population. Warts usually resolve spontaneously within a two-year period in 60 percent of cases. While multiple treatments have been proposed over the years, there is no uniformly effective treatment for warts so therapy can often be difficult and unrewarding. The most common treatment utilized is home therapy with a nonprescription salicylic acid preparation. Unfortunately, certain reports show that only two ... continue reading
    By Lara M. Allman, DPM
    1,891 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/04
    I have been in private practice for five and a half years now. I have acquired three offices and I see patients from multiple nursing homes. Like most new practitioners, I had spent numerous hours the first few years figuring out how to “run” a practice. I was eager to build my practice and apply what I had worked so hard for over the last several years in school and residency. During my first year out of residency, I spent a lot of time on marketing and trying to figure out the coding and billing. I spent my free time lecturing, visiting offices and going to just about every hospital f ... continue reading
    By Bradley W. Bakotic, DPM, DO
    18,620 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/04
    While some researchers have suggested that bone tumors affect the feet in a disproportionately small number of cases, one must keep in mind that most major studies on the subject have been assembled at major centers for the treatment of cancer.1,2 Therefore, lesions that have clearly benign clinical or radiologic features are largely omitted. Also be aware that most tumors of the bones of the distal extremities may be readily biopsied or excised, histopathologically evaluated and treated in a community hospital setting. These lesions would similarly never find their way into the f ... continue reading

    4,539 reads | 0 comments | 05/03/04
    Looking for something to support the orthotic you’re already using? Look no further than the Arch Suspender, which has lifting straps that provide adjustable support for the talonavicular joint and/or calcaneal cuboid joint. The product supports the custom Richie Brace® orthotic. While applying ankle tape to the medial arch and leg has provided temporary relief for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD), the Arch Suspender’s adjustable strapping provides “maximum support and comfort,” according to patent holder Douglas Richie, DPM. He says you can apply the Arch ... continue reading