Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
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  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • April 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 4
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    2,661 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/04
    Prove it. Well, it’s easier said than done when it comes to evidence-based medicine (EBM) in podiatry. In the Diabetes Watch column this month, guest columnist Kathleen Satterfield, DPM, tackles the issue of open amputations versus closed amputations (see page 16). She notes that on this specific topic, “much of the knowledge that we operate under comes from research at other anatomic levels by other specialists.” The lack of EBM is a prevailing issue across the board in podiatric surgery, according to one experienced surgeon and educator. He notes that podiatric surgeons still base m ... continue reading
    Guest Clinical Editor: Nicholas Sol, DPM, CPed
    11,237 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/04
    Patients who tackle the slopes have specific requirements for orthotics. In addition to reviewing the pedal mechanics and biomechanics of skiing, our expert panelists take a closer look at the design of ski boots and what impact the skier’s skill level will have on prescribing an appropriate orthotic. Without further delay, here is what they had to say. Q: What pedal mechanics are unique to skiing? A: During alpine skiing, the patient’s lower extremities never go through a complete gait cycle, notes Nicholas Sol, DPM, CPed. He says skiers should ideally have knee flexion during ... continue reading
    By Eric J. Heit, DPM and Richard T. Bouché, DPM
    60,921 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/04
    It has been speculated that 50 to 75 percent of weightbearing forces are transmitted through the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) complex during weightbearing and these forces can account for up to three times one’s body weight.1,2 Anatomical location of the hallucal sesamoids predisposes them to significant shear, pressure and ground reactive forces during weightbearing activities. As a result, sesamoids are a site for potential injury. Sesamoid pathology is not uncommon in a typical podiatric sports medicine practice. In a study of 1,000 running injuries, the sesamoids ... continue reading