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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
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  • April 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 4
    By Edwin Harris, DPM
    18,436 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/04
    Since the first recognition of talipes equinovarus (TEV), the only treatment options have been closed reduction through manipulation with immobilizing techniques and surgical correction. The goal of treatment is ensuring a painless, plantigrade, supple foot with good range of motion and normal function. However, there has been a significant evolution in the treatment of TEV over the years. In fact, there are over 2,600 literature references on the subject. TEV is an anatomically and etiologically complex condition. Understanding the morbid anatomy is crucial for successful conservative and su ... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    4,141 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/04
    Revenue enhancement was a popular theme in the exhibit hall at the APMA national meeting last August. Every other booth seemed to offer an enhancement gimmick. These exhibits were popular, especially with the younger doctors. This brought to mind a novel I read in the mid-‘70s. It was called Five Smooth Stones and was written by Anne Fairbairn. The story was about relationships but the underlying theme was, "You pay for your luck." The idea was some good things and some bad things will come your way in life. There should be a balance. If you’re out of balance to the good or to the bad, f ... continue reading
    By Peter A. Blume, DPM, Jonathan J. Key, DPM, Bauer E. Sumpio, MD, PhD
    19,967 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/04
    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects 12 million people in the United States.1 More than half of the patients with PAD are asymptomatic or have atypical symptoms.2 PAD is a narrowing of blood vessels characterized by atherosclerotic occlusive disease of the lower extremities, restricting blood flow. There are many causes of PAD. In addition to a major risk factor like smoking, diseases such as diabetes, Buerger’s disease, hypertension and Raynaud’s disease predispose patients to developing PAD. Inadequate perfusion to the lower extremity will always result in a n ... continue reading