Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • April 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 4
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM
    65,870 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Hallux rigidus is a painful and insidious condition that can lead to significant limitations in an athlete’s ability to perform. The condition is characterized by a limitation of motion in the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ), chiefly in the direction of dorsiflexion. This limitation of motion is caused by a reactive proliferation of bone along the dorsal aspect of the joint and is associated with painful, degenerative arthrosis of the first MTPJ. There are an extensive number of conditions that can result in hallux rigidus (see “A Review Of Potential Hallux Rigidus Etiologies” b... continue reading
    By Christopher R. Jarvis, MBA and David B. Mandell, JD, MBA
    3,813 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Over the past few years, we have written many articles on potential strategies that podiatrists can use to reduce income taxes, increase benefits or build retirement savings. Unfortunately, these consultations often turn out to be less than fruitful because of office politics. While the younger members of a podiatry group are often very motivated to reduce their income taxes, the older, more established doctors are often uninterested. Either they are already so close to retirement that they don’t need extra retirement planning or they are simply set in their ways and don’t want to chang... continue reading
    Having a proper follow-through allows the golfer to safely decelerate the swing and dissipate the rotational forces. Weight shift and shearing forces load the leading foot laterally as typical loads reach 85 percent of body weight.
    By Kirk Herring, DPM, and Kelli Pearson, DC
    14,011 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Over 25 million Americans play golf on a regular basis.1 Unlike many athletes, golfers also remain active well into their later years.2 With the aging of the adult population, increasing numbers of seniors will turn or return to golf for exercise and pleasure. Given the increasing numbers of people playing golf, you may start to see more patients presenting with golf-related injuries. Golf-related injuries are commonly attributed to the repetitive nature of the golf swing and a long day of walking and standing.3,4 One may also see an increased incidence of ove... continue reading