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  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
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  • April 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 4
    Having a proper follow-through allows the golfer to safely decelerate the swing and dissipate the rotational forces. Weight shift and shearing forces load the leading foot laterally as typical loads reach 85 percent of body weight.
    By Kirk Herring, DPM, and Kelli Pearson, DC
    13,995 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Over 25 million Americans play golf on a regular basis.1 Unlike many athletes, golfers also remain active well into their later years.2 With the aging of the adult population, increasing numbers of seniors will turn or return to golf for exercise and pleasure. Given the increasing numbers of people playing golf, you may start to see more patients presenting with golf-related injuries. Golf-related injuries are commonly attributed to the repetitive nature of the golf swing and a long day of walking and standing.3,4 One may also see an increased incidence of ove... continue reading
    Here is an example of a two-stage amputation that is now ready for debulking and delayed primary closure.
    By Kathleen Satterfield, DPM
    11,117 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    There is a moment in the operating room when every surgeon must make a decision about an amputation. Should we perform the amputation as a two-stage procedure or is it wise to close the surgical site right then and there? There was a time when surgeons always left these surgical sites open due to the concern of possibly closing over some bacterial contamination that would flourish in the sutured environment. Of course, there was also a time when patients were admitted to the hospital for elective bunion surgery. Obviously, times have changed. Now the surgeon who sends a tissue sample to the ... continue reading
    Contractures of capsule, ligament and muscle result in rigid equinovarus.
    By Edwin Harris, DPM
    18,056 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Since the first recognition of talipes equinovarus (TEV), the only treatment options have been closed reduction through manipulation with immobilizing techniques and surgical correction. The goal of treatment is ensuring a painless, plantigrade, supple foot with good range of motion and normal function. However, there has been a significant evolution in the treatment of TEV over the years. In fact, there are over 2,600 literature references on the subject. TEV is an anatomically and etiologically complex condition. Understanding the morbid anatomy is crucial for successful conservative and su... continue reading