Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • April 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 4
    Here is an example of a two-stage amputation that is now ready for debulking and delayed primary closure.
    By Kathleen Satterfield, DPM
    11,150 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    There is a moment in the operating room when every surgeon must make a decision about an amputation. Should we perform the amputation as a two-stage procedure or is it wise to close the surgical site right then and there? There was a time when surgeons always left these surgical sites open due to the concern of possibly closing over some bacterial contamination that would flourish in the sutured environment. Of course, there was also a time when patients were admitted to the hospital for elective bunion surgery. Obviously, times have changed. Now the surgeon who sends a tissue sample to the ... continue reading
    Contractures of capsule, ligament and muscle result in rigid equinovarus.
    By Edwin Harris, DPM
    18,107 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Since the first recognition of talipes equinovarus (TEV), the only treatment options have been closed reduction through manipulation with immobilizing techniques and surgical correction. The goal of treatment is ensuring a painless, plantigrade, supple foot with good range of motion and normal function. However, there has been a significant evolution in the treatment of TEV over the years. In fact, there are over 2,600 literature references on the subject. TEV is an anatomically and etiologically complex condition. Understanding the morbid anatomy is crucial for successful conservative and su... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    4,053 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Revenue enhancement was a popular theme in the exhibit hall at the APMA national meeting last August. Every other booth seemed to offer an enhancement gimmick. These exhibits were popular, especially with the younger doctors. This brought to mind a novel I read in the mid-‘70s. It was called Five Smooth Stones and was written by Anne Fairbairn. The story was about relationships but the underlying theme was, "You pay for your luck." The idea was some good things and some bad things will come your way in life. There should be a balance. If you’re out of balance to the good or to the bad, f... continue reading
    One pitfall of the ABI is that it yields abnormally high values with medial calcification of arteries, which one commonly sees in the diabetic population.
    By Peter A. Blume, DPM, Jonathan J. Key, DPM, Bauer E. Sumpio, MD, PhD
    19,300 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects 12 million people in the United States.1 More than half of the patients with PAD are asymptomatic or have atypical symptoms.2 PAD is a narrowing of blood vessels characterized by atherosclerotic occlusive disease of the lower extremities, restricting blood flow. There are many causes of PAD. In addition to a major risk factor like smoking, diseases such as diabetes, Buerger’s disease, hypertension and Raynaud’s disease predispose patients to developing PAD. Inadequate perfusion to the lower extremity will always result in a n... continue reading
    In a retrospective study of over 200 patients who underwent the Lapidus arthrodesis procedure, the researchers found only a 5.3 percent nonunion rate.
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    5,149 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    A new study on Lapidus arthrodesis presents some encouraging results. In a retrospective study of over 200 patients who underwent the Lapidus arthrodesis procedure, the researchers found only a 5.3 percent nonunion rate. The study, which was recently published in The Journal of Foot And Ankle Surgery (JFAS), assessed the results of a modified procedure, which emphasized joint curettage with subchondral plate preservation and screw fixation. The low nonunion rate is the most significant finding in the study, according to study co-author Lawrence Ford, DPM. “A lot of people believe t... continue reading
    By Michael Metzger, DPM, MBA
    3,883 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Choosing the best software program for your practice is not easy. There are many good practice management software programs (PMS) on the market. They vary widely in their features, costs, ease of use and learning curve. While these differentiating factors are commonly known, you may want to consider other aspects of these programs — aspects that are less commonly known or thought of — in order to obtain a software package that provides the best fit for you and your practice. For instance, most of us will think of the need to enter the insurance company’s name, address, phone number, etc... continue reading
    Koven says its Smart-V-Link Vascular Software facilitates easier pre-op documentation.

    2,346 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    A new product combines diagnostic testing with equipment that may help facilitate easier reimbursement. The Smartdop® 20EXR Doppler has Smart-V-Link™ Vascular Software that enables you to document your preoperative procedures for patient records and reimbursement. Koven Technology, the manufacturer of the product, says the software features complete ABI and TBI software for simple documentation and automatic calculation of ratios. The Smartdop, which weighs just 2 pounds, also has an optional PPG plug-in module to measure toe pressures in patients with diabetes. Koven says i... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    2,461 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Prove it. Well, it’s easier said than done when it comes to evidence-based medicine (EBM) in podiatry. In the Diabetes Watch column this month, guest columnist Kathleen Satterfield, DPM, tackles the issue of open amputations versus closed amputations (see page 16). She notes that on this specific topic, “much of the knowledge that we operate under comes from research at other anatomic levels by other specialists.” The lack of EBM is a prevailing issue across the board in podiatric surgery, according to one experienced surgeon and educator. He notes that podiatric surgeons still base m... continue reading
    More advanced skiers tend to evenly weight and/or forward weight their skis, according to Dr. Sol. He says evenly weighted skis provide the most stable support and control over direction.
    Guest Clinical Editor: Nicholas Sol, DPM, CPed
    10,441 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Patients who tackle the slopes have specific requirements for orthotics. In addition to reviewing the pedal mechanics and biomechanics of skiing, our expert panelists take a closer look at the design of ski boots and what impact the skier’s skill level will have on prescribing an appropriate orthotic. Without further delay, here is what they had to say. Q: What pedal mechanics are unique to skiing? A: During alpine skiing, the patient’s lower extremities never go through a complete gait cycle, notes Nicholas Sol, DPM, CPed. He says skiers should ideally have knee flexion during ... continue reading
    By Eric J. Heit, DPM and Richard T. Bouché, DPM
    58,702 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    It has been speculated that 50 to 75 percent of weightbearing forces are transmitted through the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) complex during weightbearing and these forces can account for up to three times one’s body weight.1,2 Anatomical location of the hallucal sesamoids predisposes them to significant shear, pressure and ground reactive forces during weightbearing activities. As a result, sesamoids are a site for potential injury. Sesamoid pathology is not uncommon in a typical podiatric sports medicine practice. In a study of 1,000 running injuries, the sesamoids... continue reading