Volume 17 - Issue 4 - April 2004

Feature »

Key Insights To Treating Talipes Equinovarus

By Edwin Harris, DPM | 16941 reads | 0 comments

Since the first recognition of talipes equinovarus (TEV), the only treatment options have been closed reduction through manipulation with immobilizing techniques and surgical correction. The goal of treatment is ensuring a painless, plantigrade, supple foot with good range of motion and normal function. However, there has been a significant evolution in the treatment of TEV over the years. In fact, there are over 2,600 literature references on the subject.
TEV is an anatomically and etiologically complex condition. Understanding the morbid anatomy is crucial for successful conservative and su



Feature »

How To Detect Peripheral Arterial Disease

By Peter A. Blume, DPM, Jonathan J. Key, DPM, Bauer E. Sumpio, MD, PhD | 17828 reads | 0 comments

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects 12 million people in the United States.1 More than half of the patients with PAD are asymptomatic or have atypical symptoms.2 PAD is a narrowing of blood vessels characterized by atherosclerotic occlusive disease of the lower extremities, restricting blood flow. There are many causes of PAD. In addition to a major risk factor like smoking, diseases such as diabetes, Buerger’s disease, hypertension and Raynaud’s disease predispose patients to developing PAD.
Inadequate perfusion to the lower extremity will always result in a n



Feature »

Inside Insights On Evaluating Office Software

By Michael Metzger, DPM, MBA | 3580 reads | 0 comments

Choosing the best software program for your practice is not easy. There are many good practice management software programs (PMS) on the market. They vary widely in their features, costs, ease of use and learning curve. While these differentiating factors are commonly known, you may want to consider other aspects of these programs — aspects that are less commonly known or thought of — in order to obtain a software package that provides the best fit for you and your practice.
For instance, most of us will think of the need to enter the insurance company’s name, address, phone number, etc



Editor's Perspective »

Evidence-Based Medicine: A Worthwhile Investment?

By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief | 2281 reads | 0 comments

Prove it. Well, it’s easier said than done when it comes to evidence-based medicine (EBM) in podiatry. In the Diabetes Watch column this month, guest columnist Kathleen Satterfield, DPM, tackles the issue of open amputations versus closed amputations (see page 16). She notes that on this specific topic, “much of the knowledge that we operate under comes from research at other anatomic levels by other specialists.”
The lack of EBM is a prevailing issue across the board in podiatric surgery, according to one experienced surgeon and educator. He notes that podiatric surgeons still base m



Continuing Education »

How To Treat Sesamoid Injuries In Athletes

By Eric J. Heit, DPM and Richard T. Bouché, DPM | 54560 reads | 0 comments

It has been speculated that 50 to 75 percent of weightbearing forces are transmitted through the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) complex during weightbearing and these forces can account for up to three times one’s body weight.1,2 Anatomical location of the hallucal sesamoids predisposes them to significant shear, pressure and ground reactive forces during weightbearing activities. As a result, sesamoids are a site for potential injury.
Sesamoid pathology is not uncommon in a typical podiatric sports medicine practice. In a study of 1,000 running injuries, the sesamoids



Diabetes Watch »

Open Or Closed? Searching For Evidence-Based Guidance On Amputations

By Kathleen Satterfield, DPM | 10507 reads | 0 comments

There is a moment in the operating room when every surgeon must make a decision about an amputation. Should we perform the amputation as a two-stage procedure or is it wise to close the surgical site right then and there? There was a time when surgeons always left these surgical sites open due to the concern of possibly closing over some bacterial contamination that would flourish in the sutured environment. Of course, there was also a time when patients were admitted to the hospital for elective bunion surgery.
Obviously, times have changed. Now the surgeon who sends a tissue sample to the



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