Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • April 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 4
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    5,566 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/04
    A new study on Lapidus arthrodesis presents some encouraging results. In a retrospective study of over 200 patients who underwent the Lapidus arthrodesis procedure, the researchers found only a 5.3 percent nonunion rate. The study, which was recently published in The Journal of Foot And Ankle Surgery (JFAS), assessed the results of a modified procedure, which emphasized joint curettage with subchondral plate preservation and screw fixation. The low nonunion rate is the most significant finding in the study, according to study co-author Lawrence Ford, DPM. “A lot of people believe t ... continue reading
    By Michael Metzger, DPM, MBA
    4,264 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/04
    Choosing the best software program for your practice is not easy. There are many good practice management software programs (PMS) on the market. They vary widely in their features, costs, ease of use and learning curve. While these differentiating factors are commonly known, you may want to consider other aspects of these programs — aspects that are less commonly known or thought of — in order to obtain a software package that provides the best fit for you and your practice. For instance, most of us will think of the need to enter the insurance company’s name, address, phone number, etc ... continue reading

    2,613 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/04
    A new product combines diagnostic testing with equipment that may help facilitate easier reimbursement. The Smartdop® 20EXR Doppler has Smart-V-Link™ Vascular Software that enables you to document your preoperative procedures for patient records and reimbursement. Koven Technology, the manufacturer of the product, says the software features complete ABI and TBI software for simple documentation and automatic calculation of ratios. The Smartdop, which weighs just 2 pounds, also has an optional PPG plug-in module to measure toe pressures in patients with diabetes. Koven says i ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    2,735 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/04
    Prove it. Well, it’s easier said than done when it comes to evidence-based medicine (EBM) in podiatry. In the Diabetes Watch column this month, guest columnist Kathleen Satterfield, DPM, tackles the issue of open amputations versus closed amputations (see page 16). She notes that on this specific topic, “much of the knowledge that we operate under comes from research at other anatomic levels by other specialists.” The lack of EBM is a prevailing issue across the board in podiatric surgery, according to one experienced surgeon and educator. He notes that podiatric surgeons still base m ... continue reading
    Guest Clinical Editor: Nicholas Sol, DPM, CPed
    11,536 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/04
    Patients who tackle the slopes have specific requirements for orthotics. In addition to reviewing the pedal mechanics and biomechanics of skiing, our expert panelists take a closer look at the design of ski boots and what impact the skier’s skill level will have on prescribing an appropriate orthotic. Without further delay, here is what they had to say. Q: What pedal mechanics are unique to skiing? A: During alpine skiing, the patient’s lower extremities never go through a complete gait cycle, notes Nicholas Sol, DPM, CPed. He says skiers should ideally have knee flexion during ... continue reading
    By Eric J. Heit, DPM and Richard T. Bouché, DPM
    62,161 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/04
    It has been speculated that 50 to 75 percent of weightbearing forces are transmitted through the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) complex during weightbearing and these forces can account for up to three times one’s body weight.1,2 Anatomical location of the hallucal sesamoids predisposes them to significant shear, pressure and ground reactive forces during weightbearing activities. As a result, sesamoids are a site for potential injury. Sesamoid pathology is not uncommon in a typical podiatric sports medicine practice. In a study of 1,000 running injuries, the sesamoids ... continue reading
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM
    71,241 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/04
    Hallux rigidus is a painful and insidious condition that can lead to significant limitations in an athlete’s ability to perform. The condition is characterized by a limitation of motion in the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ), chiefly in the direction of dorsiflexion. This limitation of motion is caused by a reactive proliferation of bone along the dorsal aspect of the joint and is associated with painful, degenerative arthrosis of the first MTPJ. There are an extensive number of conditions that can result in hallux rigidus (see “A Review Of Potential Hallux Rigidus Etiologies” b ... continue reading
    By Christopher R. Jarvis, MBA and David B. Mandell, JD, MBA
    4,151 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/04
    Over the past few years, we have written many articles on potential strategies that podiatrists can use to reduce income taxes, increase benefits or build retirement savings. Unfortunately, these consultations often turn out to be less than fruitful because of office politics. While the younger members of a podiatry group are often very motivated to reduce their income taxes, the older, more established doctors are often uninterested. Either they are already so close to retirement that they don’t need extra retirement planning or they are simply set in their ways and don’t want to chang ... continue reading
    By Kirk Herring, DPM, and Kelli Pearson, DC
    14,729 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/04
    Over 25 million Americans play golf on a regular basis.1 Unlike many athletes, golfers also remain active well into their later years.2 With the aging of the adult population, increasing numbers of seniors will turn or return to golf for exercise and pleasure. Given the increasing numbers of people playing golf, you may start to see more patients presenting with golf-related injuries. Golf-related injuries are commonly attributed to the repetitive nature of the golf swing and a long day of walking and standing.3,4 One may also see an increased incidence of ove ... continue reading
    By Kathleen Satterfield, DPM
    11,860 reads | 0 comments | 04/03/04
    There is a moment in the operating room when every surgeon must make a decision about an amputation. Should we perform the amputation as a two-stage procedure or is it wise to close the surgical site right then and there? There was a time when surgeons always left these surgical sites open due to the concern of possibly closing over some bacterial contamination that would flourish in the sutured environment. Of course, there was also a time when patients were admitted to the hospital for elective bunion surgery. Obviously, times have changed. Now the surgeon who sends a tissue sample to the ... continue reading