Volume 17 - Issue 3 - March 2004

Diagnostic Dilemmas »

Diagnosing And Treating A Painful Tumor

By Marc A. Brenner, DPM, Stanley R. Kalish, DPM, and Tom Truong, DPM | 14062 reads | 0 comments

Benign and bony outgrowths can be frequently misdiagnosed. With this mind, let us consider an unusual case involving a painful digital tumor that is gradually growing larger. Prior to presenting to our office, the patient had been evaluated by a couple of other physicians but the diagnosis had remained unclear.
The 19-year-old patient was an obese, non-diabetic female who had a chief complaint of a slowly enlarging painful tumor on the second left digit. She noted the lesion started approximately four months ago but recalled no trauma to this area.

The nodule, which had a reddish keratoti



New Products »

No More Cold Feet

3109 reads | 0 comments

If your patient’s feet need a warm up and better circulation to relive pain, a new kind of footgear may be the remedy.

The AFG Ankle/Foot Gauntlet can raise your patients’ skin surface and subcutaneous temperature by two to three degrees as part of heat therapy. Manufacturer Swede-O, Inc. says the gauntlet can relieve the pain associated with diabetes, arthritis and Raynaud’s disease.
AFG’s Trioxon lining wicks moisture away from the skin and allows the skin to breathe. The company says the product is anatomically shaped and comes with a side stabilizer insert for a



News and Trends »

New Research Emerges On Benefits Of Ultrasound Use

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 12437 reads | 0 comments

Emerging research on the therapeutic and diagnostic uses of ultrasound will be among the abstracts presented at the 17th Annual Symposium on Advanced Wound Care (SAWC) in May. Two of the studies focus on the potential benefits of using ultrasound to assist in treating problematic wounds. Paul Quintavalle, DPM, says there has been an increase of studies in recent years on the use of therapeutic ultrasound in wound healing.
“It has been shown to be a safe and potentially effective treatment,” notes Dr. Quintavalle. “It is a widely used modality in Europe, but has not become widely used in



Surgical Pearls »

How To Treat Osteoarthritis Of The First MTPJ

By Thomas Cusumano, DPM | 22464 reads | 0 comments

Hallux limitus/rigidus is defined as a degenerative arthrosis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) which is characterized by a decrease in the MTPJ range of motion and an eventual lack of motion.1 Treatment for this condition is a frequently discussed topic at podiatric conferences. When it comes to the stages of osteoarthritis in the MTPJ, one may consider performing joint preservation or joint destructive procedures.
Joint preservation procedures include cheilectomy procedures, soft tissue correction and distal/proximal osteotomies as indicated for osseous correction. Wi



Wound Care Q&A »

Key Insights On Treating Post-Op Wounds

Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM | 10369 reads | 0 comments

In a follow-up to the last Q&A column on preventing post-op wounds (see page 16, January issue), our expert panelists have reconvened to discuss the treatment of post-op wounds. They explore treatment approaches to a variety of wounds, ranging from the post-op dehiscence and infected wounds to exposed internal fixation and fracture blisters. Without further delay, here are their thoughts.

Q: How do you typically manage the post-op wound dehiscence? What types of wound products do you suggest?
A:
Ronald G. Ray, DPM, PT, says you should first remove any loose suture material and debr



Feature »

Activity Monitoring: Can It Bolster Patient Compliance?

By Katherine Holtz-Neiderer, DPM, and David G. Armstrong, DPM, MSc | 5508 reads | 0 comments

Repetitive stress is a major contributing factor to the rise of most foot problems. In the high-risk diabetic foot clinics at the Southern Arizona Veterans Affairs Medical Center, the most common of these severe complications is the diabetic foot wound. The prime etiology of diabetic foot ulcers is the combination of neuropathy and repetitive moderate stress (walking).
Diabetic foot wounds often lead to a host of other maladies including sepsis, amputation and premature death. It has also been shown that people undergoing amputation have higher healthcare costs.1,2
When it comes



  • « Previous
  •  | Page 1 of 3 | 
  • Next »