Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • March 2004 | Volume 17 - Issue 3

    3,742 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/04
    If your patient’s feet need a warm up and better circulation to relive pain, a new kind of footgear may be the remedy. The AFG™ Ankle/Foot Gauntlet can raise your patients’ skin surface and subcutaneous temperature by two to three degrees as part of heat therapy. Manufacturer Swede-O, Inc. says the gauntlet can relieve the pain associated with diabetes, arthritis and Raynaud’s disease. AFG’s Trioxon lining wicks moisture away from the skin and allows the skin to breathe. The company says the product is anatomically shaped and comes with a side stabilizer insert for a ... continue reading
    By Russell G. Volpe, DPM
    28,071 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/04
    The adult patient often seeks professional help with pain or discomfort in the foot. Pediatric consultations with a foot and ankle specialist are less often pain-related with concerns about gait or positional abnormalities more likely. When pain is the initiating complaint, it usually occurs in the child’s heel. However, the differential diagnosis of heel pain in the child can be challenging for practitioners. It may be difficult to obtain an accurate history from a child and parents are only able to relate what the child has told them or what they have observed. This can make differenti ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    13,707 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/04
    Emerging research on the therapeutic and diagnostic uses of ultrasound will be among the abstracts presented at the 17th Annual Symposium on Advanced Wound Care (SAWC) in May. Two of the studies focus on the potential benefits of using ultrasound to assist in treating problematic wounds. Paul Quintavalle, DPM, says there has been an increase of studies in recent years on the use of therapeutic ultrasound in wound healing. “It has been shown to be a safe and potentially effective treatment,” notes Dr. Quintavalle. “It is a widely used modality in Europe, but has not become widely used in ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor in Chief
    1,953 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/04
    The sheer numbers continue to astonish and surprise. During a lecture at the recent Annual Meeting of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, John Steinberg, DPM, noted 18.2 million people in the United States have diabetes and approximately half of them are undiagnosed. The associated complications with this disease are well known, but the latest statistics are particularly chilling. Heart disease reportedly affects people with diabetes twice as often as those who do not have diabetes. Current statistics also reveal that two out of three people with diabetes will die from a heart ... continue reading
    By Thomas Cusumano, DPM
    28,682 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/04
    Hallux limitus/rigidus is defined as a degenerative arthrosis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) which is characterized by a decrease in the MTPJ range of motion and an eventual lack of motion.1 Treatment for this condition is a frequently discussed topic at podiatric conferences. When it comes to the stages of osteoarthritis in the MTPJ, one may consider performing joint preservation or joint destructive procedures. Joint preservation procedures include cheilectomy procedures, soft tissue correction and distal/proximal osteotomies as indicated for osseous correction. Wi ... continue reading
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    12,134 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/04
    In a follow-up to the last Q&A column on preventing post-op wounds (see page 16, January issue), our expert panelists have reconvened to discuss the treatment of post-op wounds. They explore treatment approaches to a variety of wounds, ranging from the post-op dehiscence and infected wounds to exposed internal fixation and fracture blisters. Without further delay, here are their thoughts. Q: How do you typically manage the post-op wound dehiscence? What types of wound products do you suggest? A: Ronald G. Ray, DPM, PT, says you should first remove any loose suture material and debr ... continue reading
    By Guy R. Pupp, DPM, and Peter M. Wilusz, DPM
    14,811 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/04
    Many sources in the literature describe the presence of pedal deformity and recurrent ulcerations associated with diabetes mellitus.1-4 Establishing a multidisciplinary team of physicians is essential for avoiding complications among these patients with diabetes.5,6 Unfortunately, the pedorthotist/orthotist is a frequently underutilized member of this team. Indeed, certified CPeds can make the difference between success and failure of diabetic limb salvage and ulcer prevention. Certainly, the importance and impact of diabetic footwear cannot be ignored as a key componen ... continue reading
    By Katherine Holtz-Neiderer, DPM, and David G. Armstrong, DPM, MSc
    6,296 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/04
    Repetitive stress is a major contributing factor to the rise of most foot problems. In the high-risk diabetic foot clinics at the Southern Arizona Veterans Affairs Medical Center, the most common of these severe complications is the diabetic foot wound. The prime etiology of diabetic foot ulcers is the combination of neuropathy and repetitive moderate stress (walking). Diabetic foot wounds often lead to a host of other maladies including sepsis, amputation and premature death. It has also been shown that people undergoing amputation have higher healthcare costs.1,2 When it comes ... continue reading
    By Larry Zimmerman, DPM
    2,196 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/04
    Grover, a 61-year-old African-American male, peered down at me through what looked like magnifying glasses inside black frames. He either had his cataracts removed before intraocular lens implants were available or had seen a local ophthalmologist who made his money removing cataracts the old-fashioned way. Although Grover built pumps down at the Gorman Rupp plant, his real passion in life was being one of the pastors at his church. A simple man without pretense or excuse, he often referred to his “Lord” in our conversation and how good he was to us. Grover told me Dr. Truberry wanted t ... continue reading
    By Zach J. Tankersley, DPM, Robert W. Mendicino, DPM, Alan R. Catanzariti, DPM, and Jordan P. Grossman, DPM
    112,768 reads | 0 comments | 03/03/04
    Crush injuries of the foot are serious and can be difficult to manage. These complex injuries often involve soft tissue and osseous structures. Potentially devastating complications and long term sequelae can occur if these injuries are underestimated or mismanaged.1 Compartment syndrome is a serious complication that can occur with these types of injuries. Due to the high morbidity associated with crush injuries, prompt and meticulous care is essential.2 Omer and Pomerantz reported 50 percent of their patients who sustained crush injuries of the foot had residual pain ... continue reading