Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • December 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 12
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    28,025 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/03
    Disorders of the posterior heel may present at any age. The multitude of posterior heel problems include retrocalcaneal and pretendinous bursitis, Achilles tendonitis, retrocalcaneal exostosis and Haglund’s deformity. It is essential to consider each of these disorders as a separate entity and, although they often occur in combination, each entity requires a separate course of therapy. ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    5,211 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/03
    Methicillin-resistant Staph aureus (MRSA) infections have become increasingly prevalent in recent years in various populations. Over the past year and a half, there have been outbreaks of MRSA on athletic teams, prompting a recent report by the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that warned competitive athletes of the potential for infection. In an August edition of the Mortality and Morbidity Weekly Report (MMWR), the CDC noted an MRSA outbreak on a Colorado fencing team that occurred in February. One month before that, two Indiana high school wrestlers suffered ... continue reading
    By Nicholas A. Grumbine, DPM
    10,561 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/03
    Controlling pain has become a sophisticated, albeit inexact science. Artful pain assessment, integrated care, the titration of medications and the effective use of therapies and modalities are tailored for each patient. Indeed, meticulous clinicians must avoid tunnel vision and take the proper steps in diagnosing and treating chronic pain. ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    5,820 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/03
    Ideally, a treatment should be quick and easy to use without sacrificing patient comfort. Negative pressure wound therapy can work well on wounds as it helps to remove exudate and enhance granulation. Continuing to improve upon its VAC therapy, KCI has introduced the new VAC® GranuFoam™ Heel Dressing. Designed just for heel wounds, the dressing has won raves from a few podiatrists for its quality, speed and ease of use. Colleen Schwartz, DPM, introduced the dressing at the American Podiatric Medical Association meeting in August and praises its benefits. Dr. Schwartz ... continue reading
    By Harold Schoenhaus, DPM
    19,809 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/03
    When it comes to hallux limitus, there are several circumstances in which one may see this decreased range of motion of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. You may note a limited range in the direction of dorsiflexion, plantarflexion or both. Depending upon the etiology, you may see the restriction during nonweightbearing, static stance or during the propulsive phase of gait. The etiology may be secondary to direct macrotrauma to the great toe joint, metabolic conditions such as gouty arthritis or, most commonly, first ray hypermobility associated with abnormal pronation. Hypermobility of ... continue reading
    Clinical Editor: Nicholas Sol, DPM, CPed
    42,624 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/03
    At this time of year, many people begin to run on treadmills after receiving them as holiday presents and some seek to lose weight during the winter months. However, treadmill use increases the amount of repetition, possibly leading to biomechanical injury and potentially complicating common conditions like plantar fasciitis. With that in mind, our expert panelists take a look at the finer points of diagnosing and treating injuries sustained by patients while using treadmills. Q: What are the most important biomechanical considerations? A: Exercising on treadmills exacerbates the i ... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    1,956 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/03
    The consumer ads for pain management pharmaceuticals keep coming fast and furious. In one ad, you may see a woman standing at a window grimacing, clutching her painful knee as she watches her children play in the back yard. In the next scene, you see her smiling and pushing her daughter on a swing. You hear the voiceover come in: “Ask your physician about (fill in the name of the medication here).” Then there’s the obligatory close-up shot of the product with a rosy glow behind it and perhaps a brief hushed warning about possible side effects. Imagine flipping the script on the voic ... continue reading
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM
    18,232 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/03
    Whenever an athlete presents with an acute vesicular or chronic scaling inflammatory condition of the skin, one must consider contact dermatitis. Often, the activities of these athletes may lead the practitioner to an initial diagnosis of conditions such as friction trauma, infection and pedal hyperhidrosis while treatment of the actual condition, contact dermatitis, is significantly delayed. Contact dermatitis can manifest itself in several ways, including primary irritant contact dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis and photoallergic contact dermatitis. Irritant contact dermatitis is t ... continue reading
    By Jennifer Jansma, DPM, and John S. Steinberg, DPM
    16,967 reads | 1 comments | 12/03/03
    It has been estimated that neuropathy affects between 10 to 50 percent of patients with diabetes. Specifically, autonomic sensory neuropathy is associated with a number of clinical entities such as postural hypotension, cardiac arrhythmia, bladder dysfunction and gastrointestinal motility disturbance. Symptoms of gastrointestinal motility abnormalities can include nausea, vomiting, post-prandial fullness, early satiety, belching, bloating, erratic blood glucose levels, lack of appetite, gastro-esophageal reflux and spasms of the stomach wall. Symptoms can be mild to severe, depending on the ch ... continue reading
    By David E. Marcinko, MBA, CFP
    13,385 reads | 0 comments | 12/03/03
    Professional malpractice liability insurance protection is a major fixed operational expense in any at-risk medical practice. In most practices, liability insurance costs often represent one of the largest single line item expenses, often falling second only to staff payroll expenses. To contain these liability overhead expense costs, the physician-executive should understand the dynamics of the insurance industry selling process, which is generally sold through one of three agency avenues: • direct insurance agents serving as employees of a single insurance company; • captive insuranc ... continue reading