Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • December 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 12
    Clinical Editor: Nicholas Sol, DPM, CPed
    40,060 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    At this time of year, many people begin to run on treadmills after receiving them as holiday presents and some seek to lose weight during the winter months. However, treadmill use increases the amount of repetition, possibly leading to biomechanical injury and potentially complicating common conditions like plantar fasciitis. With that in mind, our expert panelists take a look at the finer points of diagnosing and treating injuries sustained by patients while using treadmills. Q: What are the most important biomechanical considerations? A: Exercising on treadmills exacerbates the i... continue reading
    This intraoperative photo reveals cyst formation of the first metatarsal head.
    By Harold Schoenhaus, DPM
    19,018 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    When it comes to hallux limitus, there are several circumstances in which one may see this decreased range of motion of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. You may note a limited range in the direction of dorsiflexion, plantarflexion or both. Depending upon the etiology, you may see the restriction during nonweightbearing, static stance or during the propulsive phase of gait. The etiology may be secondary to direct macrotrauma to the great toe joint, metabolic conditions such as gouty arthritis or, most commonly, first ray hypermobility associated with abnormal pronation. Hypermobility of ... continue reading
    Here is a view of contact dermatitis with marked pruritus on the right distal foot.  
(Photo courtesy of James Del Rosso, DO)
    By Mark A. Caselli, DPM
    17,506 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Whenever an athlete presents with an acute vesicular or chronic scaling inflammatory condition of the skin, one must consider contact dermatitis. Often, the activities of these athletes may lead the practitioner to an initial diagnosis of conditions such as friction trauma, infection and pedal hyperhidrosis while treatment of the actual condition, contact dermatitis, is significantly delayed. Contact dermatitis can manifest itself in several ways, including primary irritant contact dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis and photoallergic contact dermatitis. Irritant contact dermatitis is t... continue reading
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    1,817 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The consumer ads for pain management pharmaceuticals keep coming fast and furious. In one ad, you may see a woman standing at a window grimacing, clutching her painful knee as she watches her children play in the back yard. In the next scene, you see her smiling and pushing her daughter on a swing. You hear the voiceover come in: “Ask your physician about (fill in the name of the medication here).” Then there’s the obligatory close-up shot of the product with a rosy glow behind it and perhaps a brief hushed warning about possible side effects. Imagine flipping the script on the voic... continue reading
    By Jennifer Jansma, DPM, and John S. Steinberg, DPM
    16,607 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
    It has been estimated that neuropathy affects between 10 to 50 percent of patients with diabetes. Specifically, autonomic sensory neuropathy is associated with a number of clinical entities such as postural hypotension, cardiac arrhythmia, bladder dysfunction and gastrointestinal motility disturbance. Symptoms of gastrointestinal motility abnormalities can include nausea, vomiting, post-prandial fullness, early satiety, belching, bloating, erratic blood glucose levels, lack of appetite, gastro-esophageal reflux and spasms of the stomach wall. Symptoms can be mild to severe, depending on the ch... continue reading
    By David E. Marcinko, MBA, CFP
    12,980 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Professional malpractice liability insurance protection is a major fixed operational expense in any at-risk medical practice. In most practices, liability insurance costs often represent one of the largest single line item expenses, often falling second only to staff payroll expenses. To contain these liability overhead expense costs, the physician-executive should understand the dynamics of the insurance industry selling process, which is generally sold through one of three agency avenues: • direct insurance agents serving as employees of a single insurance company; • captive insuranc... continue reading

    3,401 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    In regard to last month’s “Letters” section (see “A Closer Look At Federal Funding For Residencies,” page 14, November), teaching hospitals that have intern and residency training programs and that also treat Medicare patients are currently being reimbursed by the Centers For Medicare And Medicaid Services (CMS) for direct and indirect expenses. The direct expenses would cover such financial items as intern/resident salaries, health insurance, meals, malpractice insurance and educational expenses. This is usually the smaller of the amounts received by the hospital administration. Th... continue reading
    By Donald Green, DPM, and Kathleen Halat, DPM
    5,774 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Alternative medicine has achieved widespread popularity in the United States in recent years. One survey of trends in alternative medicine use found that people in the U.S. visit alternative medicine practitioners more frequently than primary care physicians.1 Another recent survey of alternative medicine use in 3,106 pre-surgical patients found that 22 percent of patients were taking herbal remedies and 51 percent were taking vitamins.2 The greatest use of these therapies occurred among women between the ages of 40 and 60. The most common herbs used were echinacea, gingk... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    3,383 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    I have performed more than 300 unnecessary excisional biopsies during the past 28 years. They were unnecessary because the pathology reports were negative. The lesions were not malignant. It’s the five positive biopsies that made all this unnecessary surgery worth doing. I learned early in my career about the risk of neglecting to biopsy a “funny looking lesion.” A lady in her late 50s came to me the first month I was in private practice. She had a very painful ingrown toenail. The toe seemed normal and there was hardly any incurvation of the nail border. The skin was slightly red and ... continue reading
    By John Guiliana, DPM, MS, Lynn Homisak, PRT, Richard S. Levin, DPM, Hal Ornstein, DPM, and Charles R. Young, DPM
    5,321 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    When looking to expand your practice, there are an array of tactics you can use to help bolster your patient base. You could take a closer look at advances in technology that could either provide a new service for patients or enhance efficiency. Enhancing your Web presence is another avenue you can take. Embracing continuous quality measures is another approach. However, the consensus among practice management experts is that physician referrals are the golden nuggets of a successful practice. ... continue reading