Volume 16 - Issue 12 - December 2003

Diabetes Watch »

What You Should Know About Diabetic Gastroparesis

By Jennifer Jansma, DPM, and John S. Steinberg, DPM | 16435 reads | 1 comments

It has been estimated that neuropathy affects between 10 to 50 percent of patients with diabetes. Specifically, autonomic sensory neuropathy is associated with a number of clinical entities such as postural hypotension, cardiac arrhythmia, bladder dysfunction and gastrointestinal motility disturbance. Symptoms of gastrointestinal motility abnormalities can include nausea, vomiting, post-prandial fullness, early satiety, belching, bloating, erratic blood glucose levels, lack of appetite, gastro-esophageal reflux and spasms of the stomach wall. Symptoms can be mild to severe, depending on the ch



Practice Builders »

What You Can Do About Malpractice Insurance

By David E. Marcinko, MBA, CFP | 12668 reads | 0 comments

Professional malpractice liability insurance protection is a major fixed operational expense in any at-risk medical practice. In most practices, liability insurance costs often represent one of the largest single line item expenses, often falling second only to staff payroll expenses.
To contain these liability overhead expense costs, the physician-executive should understand the dynamics of the insurance industry selling process, which is generally sold through one of three agency avenues:
• direct insurance agents serving as employees of a single insurance company;
• captive insuranc



Feature »

Are Your Patients Taking Herbal Meds?

By Donald Green, DPM, and Kathleen Halat, DPM | 5620 reads | 0 comments

Alternative medicine has achieved widespread popularity in the United States in recent years. One survey of trends in alternative medicine use found that people in the U.S. visit alternative medicine practitioners more frequently than primary care physicians.1 Another recent survey of alternative medicine use in 3,106 pre-surgical patients found that 22 percent of patients were taking herbal remedies and 51 percent were taking vitamins.2 The greatest use of these therapies occurred among women between the ages of 40 and 60. The most common herbs used were echinacea, gingk



Feature »

How-To Insights For Expanding Your Practice

By John Guiliana, DPM, MS, Lynn Homisak, PRT, Richard S. Levin, DPM, Hal Ornstein, DPM, and Charles R. Young, DPM | 5194 reads | 0 comments

When looking to expand your practice, there are an array of tactics you can use to help bolster your patient base. You could take a closer look at advances in technology that could either provide a new service for patients or enhance efficiency. Enhancing your Web presence is another avenue you can take. Embracing continuous quality measures is another approach. However, the consensus among practice management experts is that physician referrals are the golden nuggets of a successful practice.



Feature »

How To Master Posterior Heel Disorders

By Babak Baravarian, DPM | 26851 reads | 0 comments

Disorders of the posterior heel may present at any age. The multitude of posterior heel problems include retrocalcaneal and pretendinous bursitis, Achilles tendonitis, retrocalcaneal exostosis and Haglund’s deformity. It is essential to consider each of these disorders as a separate entity and, although they often occur in combination, each entity requires a separate course of therapy.



Feature »

Reviving An Ancient Therapy To Manage Chronic Pain

By Nicholas A. Grumbine, DPM | 9905 reads | 0 comments

Controlling pain has become a sophisticated, albeit inexact science. Artful pain assessment, integrated care, the titration of medications and the effective use of therapies and modalities are tailored for each patient. Indeed, meticulous clinicians must avoid tunnel vision and take the proper steps in diagnosing and treating chronic pain.



  • « Previous
  •  | Page 1 of 3 | 
  • Next »