Volume 16 - Issue 12 - December 2003

Technology In Practice »

How A New Dressing May Enhance Healing Of Heel Ulcers

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 5314 reads | 0 comments

Ideally, a treatment should be quick and easy to use without sacrificing patient comfort. Negative pressure wound therapy can work well on wounds as it helps to remove exudate and enhance granulation. Continuing to improve upon its VAC therapy, KCI has introduced the new VAC® GranuFoam Heel Dressing. Designed just for heel wounds, the dressing has won raves from a few podiatrists for its quality, speed and ease of use. Colleen Schwartz, DPM, introduced the dressing at the American Podiatric Medical Association meeting in August and praises its benefits.
Dr. Schwartz



Orthotics Q&A »

When Treadmill Running Causes Foot Pain

Clinical Editor: Nicholas Sol, DPM, CPed | 37886 reads | 0 comments

At this time of year, many people begin to run on treadmills after receiving them as holiday presents and some seek to lose weight during the winter months. However, treadmill use increases the amount of repetition, possibly leading to biomechanical injury and potentially complicating common conditions like plantar fasciitis. With that in mind, our expert panelists take a look at the finer points of diagnosing and treating injuries sustained by patients while using treadmills.

Q: What are the most important biomechanical considerations?
A:
Exercising on treadmills exacerbates the i



Sports Medicine »

How To Handle Contact Dermatitis In Athletes

By Mark A. Caselli, DPM | 16425 reads | 0 comments

Whenever an athlete presents with an acute vesicular or chronic scaling inflammatory condition of the skin, one must consider contact dermatitis. Often, the activities of these athletes may lead the practitioner to an initial diagnosis of conditions such as friction trauma, infection and pedal hyperhidrosis while treatment of the actual condition, contact dermatitis, is significantly delayed. Contact dermatitis can manifest itself in several ways, including primary irritant contact dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis and photoallergic contact dermatitis.

Irritant contact dermatitis is t



Diabetes Watch »

What You Should Know About Diabetic Gastroparesis

By Jennifer Jansma, DPM, and John S. Steinberg, DPM | 16201 reads | 1 comments

It has been estimated that neuropathy affects between 10 to 50 percent of patients with diabetes. Specifically, autonomic sensory neuropathy is associated with a number of clinical entities such as postural hypotension, cardiac arrhythmia, bladder dysfunction and gastrointestinal motility disturbance. Symptoms of gastrointestinal motility abnormalities can include nausea, vomiting, post-prandial fullness, early satiety, belching, bloating, erratic blood glucose levels, lack of appetite, gastro-esophageal reflux and spasms of the stomach wall. Symptoms can be mild to severe, depending on the ch



Practice Builders »

What You Can Do About Malpractice Insurance

By David E. Marcinko, MBA, CFP | 12281 reads | 0 comments

Professional malpractice liability insurance protection is a major fixed operational expense in any at-risk medical practice. In most practices, liability insurance costs often represent one of the largest single line item expenses, often falling second only to staff payroll expenses.
To contain these liability overhead expense costs, the physician-executive should understand the dynamics of the insurance industry selling process, which is generally sold through one of three agency avenues:
• direct insurance agents serving as employees of a single insurance company;
• captive insuranc



Feature »

Are Your Patients Taking Herbal Meds?

By Donald Green, DPM, and Kathleen Halat, DPM | 5414 reads | 0 comments

Alternative medicine has achieved widespread popularity in the United States in recent years. One survey of trends in alternative medicine use found that people in the U.S. visit alternative medicine practitioners more frequently than primary care physicians.1 Another recent survey of alternative medicine use in 3,106 pre-surgical patients found that 22 percent of patients were taking herbal remedies and 51 percent were taking vitamins.2 The greatest use of these therapies occurred among women between the ages of 40 and 60. The most common herbs used were echinacea, gingk



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