Volume 16 - Issue 12 - December 2003

Feature »

How-To Insights For Expanding Your Practice

By John Guiliana, DPM, MS, Lynn Homisak, PRT, Richard S. Levin, DPM, Hal Ornstein, DPM, and Charles R. Young, DPM | 4766 reads | 0 comments

When looking to expand your practice, there are an array of tactics you can use to help bolster your patient base. You could take a closer look at advances in technology that could either provide a new service for patients or enhance efficiency. Enhancing your Web presence is another avenue you can take. Embracing continuous quality measures is another approach. However, the consensus among practice management experts is that physician referrals are the golden nuggets of a successful practice.



Feature »

How To Master Posterior Heel Disorders

By Babak Baravarian, DPM | 24944 reads | 0 comments

Disorders of the posterior heel may present at any age. The multitude of posterior heel problems include retrocalcaneal and pretendinous bursitis, Achilles tendonitis, retrocalcaneal exostosis and Haglund’s deformity. It is essential to consider each of these disorders as a separate entity and, although they often occur in combination, each entity requires a separate course of therapy.



Feature »

Reviving An Ancient Therapy To Manage Chronic Pain

By Nicholas A. Grumbine, DPM | 8891 reads | 0 comments

Controlling pain has become a sophisticated, albeit inexact science. Artful pain assessment, integrated care, the titration of medications and the effective use of therapies and modalities are tailored for each patient. Indeed, meticulous clinicians must avoid tunnel vision and take the proper steps in diagnosing and treating chronic pain.



Continuing Education »

How To Select The Right Procedure For Hallux Limitus

By Harold Schoenhaus, DPM | 17429 reads | 0 comments

When it comes to hallux limitus, there are several circumstances in which one may see this decreased range of motion of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. You may note a limited range in the direction of dorsiflexion, plantarflexion or both. Depending upon the etiology, you may see the restriction during nonweightbearing, static stance or during the propulsive phase of gait.
The etiology may be secondary to direct macrotrauma to the great toe joint, metabolic conditions such as gouty arthritis or, most commonly, first ray hypermobility associated with abnormal pronation. Hypermobility of



Editor's Perspective »

Flipping The Script For Unconventional Remedies?

By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief | 1555 reads | 0 comments

The consumer ads for pain management pharmaceuticals keep coming fast and furious. In one ad, you may see a woman standing at a window grimacing, clutching her painful knee as she watches her children play in the back yard. In the next scene, you see her smiling and pushing her daughter on a swing. You hear the voiceover come in: “Ask your physician about (fill in the name of the medication here).”
Then there’s the obligatory close-up shot of the product with a rosy glow behind it and perhaps a brief hushed warning about possible side effects.
Imagine flipping the script on the voic



Letters »

Another View Of Podiatric Residency Funding

3141 reads | 0 comments

In regard to last month’s “Letters” section (see “A Closer Look At Federal Funding For Residencies,” page 14, November), teaching hospitals that have intern and residency training programs and that also treat Medicare patients are currently being reimbursed by the Centers For Medicare And Medicaid Services (CMS) for direct and indirect expenses.
The direct expenses would cover such financial items as intern/resident salaries, health insurance, meals, malpractice insurance and educational expenses. This is usually the smaller of the amounts received by the hospital administration. Th



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