Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • November 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 11
    By Michael Z. Metzger, DPM, MBA
    9,249 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The office brochure is an effective and comparatively inexpensive method for both internal and external marketing of your practice. With the advent of desktop publishing, almost anyone with a computer and a few hours can design, write and edit the brochure. Once it is printed, you can use the brochure to promote your practice effectively to present and future patients, referring physicians and insurance companies. However, to be successful, you must understand certain concepts such as color, paper weight, font and layout. At one time, an office brochure was considered a tool for only the most... continue reading
    Here is an intraoperative view of the GraftJacket, which “supports rapid revascularization and cellular repopulation,” according to the manufacturer.
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    7,956 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Ulcer management and repair is an important aspect of podiatric practice. When it comes to facilitating ulcer treatment, there are regenerative tissue matrices that one may use. Easy application is a must in such products and it’s also important to ensure even healing in the affected area. It’s also an advantage when the graft you select has a number of potential applications. With this in mind, one may want to consider the GraftJacket™ scaffold (Wright Medical), a human dermal membrane that has won raves from podiatrists. GraftJacket’s ease of use and single applicati... continue reading
    It has been shown that using proprioceptive/balance training programs has resulted in a twofold decrease in the risk of recurrent ankle sprain.
    By John Hester, DPM, PT
    10,823 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Here is a close-up view of an ischemic foot with necrotic ulcerations.
    Clinical Editor: Lawrence Karlock, DPM
    9,811 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Ischemic wounds can be challenging for any physician. With this in mind, the panelists discuss key indicators to look for in the history and physical exam, the effectiveness of noninvasive vascular testing and parameters for performing an amputation after bypass surgery. They also explore the treatment possibilities of angioplasty/stenting and the long leg distal bypass. Without further delay, here is what they had to say. Q: What is your workup/treatment plan when a new patient presents with an ischemic foot wound? A: Mark Beylin, DPM, says it starts by determining the patient’s ... continue reading
    The author recommends using a night splint when patients still have pain greater than three (on a pain scale of one to 10) two months after treatment.
    By John Mozena, DPM
    13,440 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Plantar fasciitis is certainly one of the most common conditions we see in podiatric practice and more than 90 percent of patients are cured with conservative treatment.1 It sounds relatively simple. Well, in order to consistently facilitate successful outcomes, not only must one have a strong anatomical understanding of the plantar fascia, there must also be a strong command of the various causes of the condition, key diagnostic indicators and when to apply various treatment solutions in the armamentarium. ... continue reading