Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • November 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 11
    By John H. McCord, DPM
    12,615 reads | 3 comments | 11/03/03
    I have a rule for my staff. If any of them treats a patient with disrespect, that employee is immediately terminated. I have the same rule for my patients regarding their treatment of my staff. Recently, a young, new receptionist came to me upset about something. She told me one of our patients called about his appointment and when she asked him to hold so she could check the time, he called her a “dumb b----” and hung up. I looked at the man’s chart and noted he had been disrespectful to the female staff on other occasions. I called Mr. Jones. “Hank, this is Dr. McCord. Could I spea ... continue reading
    By Jesse B. Burks, DPM
    22,635 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/03
    Surgery in general seems to gravitate toward smaller and less invasive procedures. Obviously, the less tissue disruption that occurs during surgery, the less risk one has of postoperative complications such as scarring, infections, delayed healing, etc. Although this may not be true with every surgical advance, arthroscopy has revolutionized the treatment of joint disorders and allowed many of these common complications to be almost entirely eliminated. Increasing indications for this technique include the treatment of subtalar, calcaneal cuboid and first metatarsal disorders. However, for t ... continue reading

    5,853 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/03
    I am writing to you regarding some misinformation that is contained within the editorial section of the August 2003 issue (see “Editor’s Perspective,” page 18, August issue). I am a residency director and consider myself fairly conversant with current residency reimbursement issues, that is to say how residency programs in general and podiatric residencies in particular are reimbursed from the federal government. For too long, the popular myth has been that residencies, in general, “make” hospitals money. It may be true that the presence of a residency may well encourage the medical ... continue reading
    By James Thomas, DPM
    29,803 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/03
    Symptoms associated with compression of the posterior tibial nerve and its branches first appeared in the literature in the early ‘60s.1-3 Since these early reports over 40 years ago, tarsal tunnel syndrome has become one of the most written about and discussed foot and ankle pathologies. Yet, even with the vast amount of literature on the subject, tarsal tunnel syndrome often remains somewhat elusive in regard to diagnosis and treatment. When inspecting the anatomy of the posterior tibial nerve, it is easy to appreciate why compression neuropathy may occur. Entrapment may occur ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    6,120 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/03
    Compliance may be an issue for diabetic patients wearing removable cast walkers, according to the results of a recent study on activity patterns. A recent study in Diabetes Care assesses the activity patterns of those with diabetic foot ulcerations and finds those involved in the study did not have adequate plantar pressure relief for nearly 75 percent of the steps they were taking. The study tracked 20 patients with neuropathic diabetic foot wounds, which were all classified as University of Texas grade 1 stage A. The patients each received a standard removable cast walker (Royce Me ... continue reading
    By Lowell Scott Weil, Jr., DPM, MBA; By Patrick A. DeHeer, DPM, with Stephen M. Offutt, DPM, Gary A. Trent, DPM, and Michael J. Baker, DPM
    64,529 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/03
    Hope. Lowell Scott Weil Jr., DPM, says ESWT is a non-invasive alternative with minimal risk for patients who have failed conservative treatment for plantar fasciitis. Medical devices and technology are constantly changing and evolving with the “newest and best” treatments being constantly promoted. Whenever new treatments emerge, they must be looked at carefully and critically to assess their efficacy and safety. They must also be compared to the currently accepted treatments and their benefits over those modalities. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) for the treatment of musculos ... continue reading

    2,109 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/03
    A new philosophy toward skin care now combines the best ingredients of several systems to emphasize prevention. The new Secura™ Skin Care System combines elements of Smith and Nephew’s Triple Care™ and Nursing Care™. As the company notes, the new line combines the already known skin-friendly formulas to emphasize preventive skin care rather than mere basic care. Secura is available in a color-coded system consisting of four steps: cleansing, protecting, moisturizing and treating. It’s part of Smith and Nephew’s new Skin Equity™ ph ... continue reading
    By Michael Z. Metzger, DPM, MBA
    11,024 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/03
    The office brochure is an effective and comparatively inexpensive method for both internal and external marketing of your practice. With the advent of desktop publishing, almost anyone with a computer and a few hours can design, write and edit the brochure. Once it is printed, you can use the brochure to promote your practice effectively to present and future patients, referring physicians and insurance companies. However, to be successful, you must understand certain concepts such as color, paper weight, font and layout. At one time, an office brochure was considered a tool for only the most ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    8,479 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/03
    Ulcer management and repair is an important aspect of podiatric practice. When it comes to facilitating ulcer treatment, there are regenerative tissue matrices that one may use. Easy application is a must in such products and it’s also important to ensure even healing in the affected area. It’s also an advantage when the graft you select has a number of potential applications. With this in mind, one may want to consider the GraftJacket™ scaffold (Wright Medical), a human dermal membrane that has won raves from podiatrists. GraftJacket’s ease of use and single applicati ... continue reading
    By John Hester, DPM, PT
    12,153 reads | 0 comments | 11/03/03