Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
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  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • October 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 10
    By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief
    1,593 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Recently, someone came out to “test” the water at my new home. The tester mixed a chemical or two in a small container with water from my sink. It came up cloudy. He said it was hard water, which could cause clothing damage, pipe damage and potentially adverse health effects as well. He produced an article about environmental problems in the areas, talked about the color of my ice cubes and asked how much money I spent on soap and clothing. About midway through the spiel, I stopped him and said, “What are you selling and how much is it?” He was offering a system that would clean ... continue reading
    The patient had a midfoot amputation and a chronic, non-healing wound with heavy wound bed contamination and sub-acute osteomyelitis.
    By Anthony C. Yung, DPM, and John S. Steinberg, DPM
    20,143 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
    Surgical debridement of infected bone is an unfortunate reality for those of us who frequently treat patients with diabetes. While adequate debridement is the most important step in treating osteomyelitis, many authors have commented on the adjunctive role of antibiotics in this clinical dilemma.1-3 Systemic antibiotics are routinely used preoperatively and have been advocated for six weeks or more. However, infected bone may become devascularized, making the delivery of systemic antibiotics less than desirable. Delivering systemic antibiotics may also be compromised when there is a... continue reading
    The authors note that the BIO 4000 from Apex (as shown above) is a popular diabetic boot for those who work in an environment where boots are required.
    By Jonathan Moore, DPM, MS and Kimberly Moore, OTR
    30,678 reads | 3 comments | 09/03/08
    If you as a podiatric physician have not established yourself as the expert of the diabetic foot within your area, now is the time. There is no reason why you shouldn’t be the “go to” guy or gal in your community when it comes to treating, managing and preventing diabetes-related lower extremity complications. Managing the diabetic foot is all about a team approach and establishing yourself as the quarterback will not only improve the quality of care for your patients but it can also greatly enhance your business. The podiatric literature is replete with dozens of studies demonstrating... continue reading