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  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
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  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
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  • October 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 10
    Using the Harvest double syringe applicator, you will see the APC+ form a gel via activation with a calcium chloride/thrombin mixture upon applying it to the wound.
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, CWS
    16,078 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    There has been a plethora of advances, especially within the last several years, for the treatment of chronic wounds. One of the more notable advancements is the use of autologous platelet-derived growth factors. Not only have platelet-derived growth factors gained notoriety in specialties such as orthopedic, maxillofacial and plastic surgery, the technology is increasingly being recognized as an important modality for accelerating healing in chronic wounds.1-3 Human epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been shown to enhance wound healing in diabetic ulcers.4 Researchers ha... continue reading
    The Arizona AFO is popular among podiatrists for treating Charcot deformities and adult-acquired flatfoot.
    Clinical Editor: Nicholas Sol, DPM
    22,415 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
    When weighing the options for ankle foot orthoses (AFOs), you must consider many different factors in order to find the most appropriate device for the patient. Both hinged and non-hinged AFOs work well for patients with certain conditions but not so well for others. In addition, shoe modifications may be necessary in order to help ensure the success of the AFO. With these issues in mind, our expert panelists take a look at the ins and outs of prescribing hinged and non-hinged AFOs. Q: What are the three or four most frequent diagnoses for which you prescribe a non-hinged AFO? A: N... continue reading
    MRSA infections (as shown above) are becoming increasingly more prevalent. The author notes that rates of nosocomial MRSA approach 60 percent in many ICUs. (Photo courtesy of Lawrence Karlock, DPM)
    By Mark Kosinski, DPM
    67,473 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The common thread shared by virtually all antibiotics relevant to podiatry is their activity against S. aureus. After all, S. aureus is by far the predominant infecting organism in lower extremity skin and skin structure infections. The rationale behind choosing an appropriate anti-staphylococcal drug is a daunting task given the ever-changing resistance pattern of this formidable organism. Today, virtually all strains of S. aureus found in lower extremity infections produce beta-lactamase. Beta-lactamase (also known as penicillinase) is an enzyme that cleaves t... continue reading