Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
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  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • October 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 10
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    3,817 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/03
    Podiatrists looking for an even playing field when it comes to Medicaid reimbursement may be interested in a resolution that is making its way through the House of Representatives. As this issue went to press, Congress is considering a resolution to expand the definition of “physician”in the Medicaid program. House Resolution 2959 would amend Title XIX of the Social Security Act to include podiatrists as physicians in Medicaid, making it consistent with Medicare’s definition of physicians. Physician is now defined by Medicaid as MDs and DOs. The American Podiatric Medical Association (A ... continue reading
    By Mark Kosinski, DPM
    74,533 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/03
    The common thread shared by virtually all antibiotics relevant to podiatry is their activity against S. aureus. After all, S. aureus is by far the predominant infecting organism in lower extremity skin and skin structure infections. The rationale behind choosing an appropriate anti-staphylococcal drug is a daunting task given the ever-changing resistance pattern of this formidable organism. Today, virtually all strains of S. aureus found in lower extremity infections produce beta-lactamase. Beta-lactamase (also known as penicillinase) is an enzyme that cleaves t ... continue reading
    Clinical Editor: Nicholas Sol, DPM
    25,522 reads | 1 comments | 10/03/03
    When weighing the options for ankle foot orthoses (AFOs), you must consider many different factors in order to find the most appropriate device for the patient. Both hinged and non-hinged AFOs work well for patients with certain conditions but not so well for others. In addition, shoe modifications may be necessary in order to help ensure the success of the AFO. With these issues in mind, our expert panelists take a look at the ins and outs of prescribing hinged and non-hinged AFOs. Q: What are the three or four most frequent diagnoses for which you prescribe a non-hinged AFO? A: N ... continue reading