Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • October 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 10
    By Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor
    5,621 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/03
    The average person takes 8,000 to 10,000 steps a day, according to the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). Add in exercise, poor-fitting shoes and possible diabetes-related complications, and it is no wonder that 5 percent of the United States population have corns or calluses. With this in mind, Xenna Corporation introduced the Callex ointment earlier this year. The acid-free ointment uses natural plant enzymes to exfoliate hyperkeratotic tissue. Those who have used the product cite ease of use, quick results and overall effectiveness wherever dry, thickened skin is a problem. ... continue reading
    By Robert Mendicino, DPM, Alan Catanzariti, DPM, and Christopher L. Reeves, DPM, MS
    28,953 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/03
    Symptomatic flexible flatfoot conditions are common entities in both the adolescent and adult populations. Ligamentous laxity and equinus play a significant role in most adolescent deformities. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is the most common cause of adult acquired flatfoot. One should consider surgical treatment for patients who have failed nonoperative therapy and have advancing symptoms and deformities that significantly interfere with the functional demands of daily life. The Evans anterior calcaneal osteotomy is indicated for late stage II (Johnson and Strom’s Classificat ... continue reading
    By Robert Smith, Contributing Editor
    8,032 reads | 0 comments | 10/03/03
    In-office product dispensing adds yet another role podiatrists must play for their patients—not only must you be a physician and healer, you now must be a retailer as well. While an increasing number of podiatric practices make products available for sale in treatment rooms, reception areas or even their own retail shops, some still decry the practice as exploitative, greedy or unethical. However, DPMs who dispense products in the office emphatically deny such judgments. “We hear so much about why some podiatrists won’t dispense products,” says Hal Ornstein, DPM, a New Jersey-based pr ... continue reading