Volume 16 - Issue 10 - October 2003

Continuing Education »

How To Choose Antibiotics For Staph Aureus Infections

By Mark Kosinski, DPM | 66239 reads | 0 comments

The common thread shared by virtually all antibiotics relevant to podiatry is their activity against S. aureus. After all, S. aureus is by far the predominant infecting organism in lower extremity skin and skin structure infections. The rationale behind choosing an appropriate anti-staphylococcal drug is a daunting task given the ever-changing resistance pattern of this formidable organism.
Today, virtually all strains of S. aureus found in lower extremity infections produce beta-lactamase. Beta-lactamase (also known as penicillinase) is an enzyme that cleaves t



Editor's Perspective »

In-Office Dispensing: Why Trust Is Essential

By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief | 1522 reads | 0 comments

Recently, someone came out to “test” the water at my new home. The tester mixed a chemical or two in a small container with water from my sink. It came up cloudy. He said it was hard water, which could cause clothing damage, pipe damage and potentially adverse health effects as well. He produced an article about environmental problems in the areas, talked about the color of my ice cubes and asked how much money I spent on soap and clothing.
About midway through the spiel, I stopped him and said, “What are you selling and how much is it?”
He was offering a system that would clean



Feature »

Current Concepts In Flatfoot Surgery

By Robert Mendicino, DPM, Alan Catanzariti, DPM, and Christopher L. Reeves, DPM, MS | 27809 reads | 0 comments

Symptomatic flexible flatfoot conditions are common entities in both the adolescent and adult populations. Ligamentous laxity and equinus play a significant role in most adolescent deformities. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is the most common cause of adult acquired flatfoot. One should consider surgical treatment for patients who have failed nonoperative therapy and have advancing symptoms and deformities that significantly interfere with the functional demands of daily life.
The Evans anterior calcaneal osteotomy is indicated for late stage II (Johnson and Strom’s Classificat



Forum »

Share An Opinion Or A Story: It's Your Turn

By John McCord, DPM | 2442 reads | 0 comments

Jeff Hall, the Editor-In-Chief of this magazine, asked me to help edit this column a few years ago. It sounded like an easy task so I said yes. The deal was podiatrists would write the column and I would edit unless nobody sent editorials. In that case, I would do the writing. I added up the articles from the past three years and I’ve done most of the writing so it’s your turn.
Writing didn’t come easy for me. I did poorly in my English classes all through school. I didn’t understand the deeper meaning of literary fiction. I lacked interest in creative writing and once handed in a sho



News and Trends »

APMA Pushes For Medicaid Bill To Define DPMs As Physicians

By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor | 3262 reads | 0 comments

Podiatrists looking for an even playing field when it comes to Medicaid reimbursement may be interested in a resolution that is making its way through the House of Representatives. As this issue went to press, Congress is considering a resolution to expand the definition of “physician”in the Medicaid program. House Resolution 2959 would amend Title XIX of the Social Security Act to include podiatrists as physicians in Medicaid, making it consistent with Medicare’s definition of physicians. Physician is now defined by Medicaid as MDs and DOs.
The American Podiatric Medical Association (A



Orthotics Q&A »

Selecting Appropriate AFOs: Key Considerations And Modifications

Clinical Editor: Nicholas Sol, DPM | 21921 reads | 1 comments

When weighing the options for ankle foot orthoses (AFOs), you must consider many different factors in order to find the most appropriate device for the patient. Both hinged and non-hinged AFOs work well for patients with certain conditions but not so well for others. In addition, shoe modifications may be necessary in order to help ensure the success of the AFO. With these issues in mind, our expert panelists take a look at the ins and outs of prescribing hinged and non-hinged AFOs.

Q: What are the three or four most frequent diagnoses for which you prescribe a non-hinged AFO?
A:
N



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