Volume 16 - Issue 10 - October 2003

Feature »

Taking A Closer Look At In-Office Dispensing

By Robert Smith, Contributing Editor | 7313 reads | 0 comments

In-office product dispensing adds yet another role podiatrists must play for their patients—not only must you be a physician and healer, you now must be a retailer as well. While an increasing number of podiatric practices make products available for sale in treatment rooms, reception areas or even their own retail shops, some still decry the practice as exploitative, greedy or unethical. However, DPMs who dispense products in the office emphatically deny such judgments.
“We hear so much about why some podiatrists won’t dispense products,” says Hal Ornstein, DPM, a New Jersey-based pr



Feature »

Treatment Solutions For Common Soccer Injuries

By Richard T. Braver, DPM | 61175 reads | 1 comments

Soccer is the most widely played sport in the world. There are two good reasons for the popularity of youth soccer versus other American sports such as football. It is more appealing to female participants and there are far fewer traumatic injuries. However, there is still an abundance of soccer injuries. In particular, there is a higher incidence of shin splints and plantar fasciitis among women and a higher incidence of contusions among men. Podiatric physicians who treat sports injuries have also seen an abundance of posterior heel pain in children.



Feature »

A New Approach To Using Growth Factors In Wound Healing

By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, CWS | 15628 reads | 0 comments

There has been a plethora of advances, especially within the last several years, for the treatment of chronic wounds. One of the more notable advancements is the use of autologous platelet-derived growth factors. Not only have platelet-derived growth factors gained notoriety in specialties such as orthopedic, maxillofacial and plastic surgery, the technology is increasingly being recognized as an important modality for accelerating healing in chronic wounds.1-3
Human epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been shown to enhance wound healing in diabetic ulcers.4 Researchers ha



Continuing Education »

How To Choose Antibiotics For Staph Aureus Infections

By Mark Kosinski, DPM | 65694 reads | 0 comments

The common thread shared by virtually all antibiotics relevant to podiatry is their activity against S. aureus. After all, S. aureus is by far the predominant infecting organism in lower extremity skin and skin structure infections. The rationale behind choosing an appropriate anti-staphylococcal drug is a daunting task given the ever-changing resistance pattern of this formidable organism.
Today, virtually all strains of S. aureus found in lower extremity infections produce beta-lactamase. Beta-lactamase (also known as penicillinase) is an enzyme that cleaves t



Editor's Perspective »

In-Office Dispensing: Why Trust Is Essential

By Jeff Hall, Editor-in-Chief | 1505 reads | 0 comments

Recently, someone came out to “test” the water at my new home. The tester mixed a chemical or two in a small container with water from my sink. It came up cloudy. He said it was hard water, which could cause clothing damage, pipe damage and potentially adverse health effects as well. He produced an article about environmental problems in the areas, talked about the color of my ice cubes and asked how much money I spent on soap and clothing.
About midway through the spiel, I stopped him and said, “What are you selling and how much is it?”
He was offering a system that would clean



Feature »

Current Concepts In Flatfoot Surgery

By Robert Mendicino, DPM, Alan Catanzariti, DPM, and Christopher L. Reeves, DPM, MS | 27696 reads | 0 comments

Symptomatic flexible flatfoot conditions are common entities in both the adolescent and adult populations. Ligamentous laxity and equinus play a significant role in most adolescent deformities. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is the most common cause of adult acquired flatfoot. One should consider surgical treatment for patients who have failed nonoperative therapy and have advancing symptoms and deformities that significantly interfere with the functional demands of daily life.
The Evans anterior calcaneal osteotomy is indicated for late stage II (Johnson and Strom’s Classificat



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