Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
  • Art Director:
    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • October 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 10
    The authors note that the BIO 4000 from Apex (as shown above) is a popular diabetic boot for those who work in an environment where boots are required.
    By Jonathan Moore, DPM, MS and Kimberly Moore, OTR
    30,688 reads | 3 comments | 09/03/08
    If you as a podiatric physician have not established yourself as the expert of the diabetic foot within your area, now is the time. There is no reason why you shouldn’t be the “go to” guy or gal in your community when it comes to treating, managing and preventing diabetes-related lower extremity complications. Managing the diabetic foot is all about a team approach and establishing yourself as the quarterback will not only improve the quality of care for your patients but it can also greatly enhance your business. The podiatric literature is replete with dozens of studies demonstrating... continue reading
    The active endoprotease in Callex ointment breaks the 10-end peptide bonds on the protein chains of callus tissue, according to Xenna Corporation. It says patients can expect relief from calluses in five to 20 days.
    By Robi Garthwait, Contributing Editor
    5,018 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The average person takes 8,000 to 10,000 steps a day, according to the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). Add in exercise, poor-fitting shoes and possible diabetes-related complications, and it is no wonder that 5 percent of the United States population have corns or calluses. With this in mind, Xenna Corporation introduced the Callex ointment earlier this year. The acid-free ointment uses natural plant enzymes to exfoliate hyperkeratotic tissue. Those who have used the product cite ease of use, quick results and overall effectiveness wherever dry, thickened skin is a problem. ... continue reading
    One will often encounter the peroneus brevis and sural nerve with the dissection. Locating these anatomical structures is a must during the preoperative planning stages of an Evans anterior calcaneal osteotomy.
    By Robert Mendicino, DPM, Alan Catanzariti, DPM, and Christopher L. Reeves, DPM, MS
    28,054 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Symptomatic flexible flatfoot conditions are common entities in both the adolescent and adult populations. Ligamentous laxity and equinus play a significant role in most adolescent deformities. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is the most common cause of adult acquired flatfoot. One should consider surgical treatment for patients who have failed nonoperative therapy and have advancing symptoms and deformities that significantly interfere with the functional demands of daily life. The Evans anterior calcaneal osteotomy is indicated for late stage II (Johnson and Strom’s Classificat... continue reading
    By Robert Smith, Contributing Editor
    7,493 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    In-office product dispensing adds yet another role podiatrists must play for their patients—not only must you be a physician and healer, you now must be a retailer as well. While an increasing number of podiatric practices make products available for sale in treatment rooms, reception areas or even their own retail shops, some still decry the practice as exploitative, greedy or unethical. However, DPMs who dispense products in the office emphatically deny such judgments. “We hear so much about why some podiatrists won’t dispense products,” says Hal Ornstein, DPM, a New Jersey-based pr... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    2,494 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Jeff Hall, the Editor-In-Chief of this magazine, asked me to help edit this column a few years ago. It sounded like an easy task so I said yes. The deal was podiatrists would write the column and I would edit unless nobody sent editorials. In that case, I would do the writing. I added up the articles from the past three years and I’ve done most of the writing so it’s your turn. Writing didn’t come easy for me. I did poorly in my English classes all through school. I didn’t understand the deeper meaning of literary fiction. I lacked interest in creative writing and once handed in a sho... continue reading
    Above, you can see genu valgum in a soccer player with pes planus.
    By Richard T. Braver, DPM
    62,927 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
    Soccer is the most widely played sport in the world. There are two good reasons for the popularity of youth soccer versus other American sports such as football. It is more appealing to female participants and there are far fewer traumatic injuries. However, there is still an abundance of soccer injuries. In particular, there is a higher incidence of shin splints and plantar fasciitis among women and a higher incidence of contusions among men. Podiatric physicians who treat sports injuries have also seen an abundance of posterior heel pain in children. ... continue reading
    By Brian McCurdy, Associate Editor
    3,376 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Podiatrists looking for an even playing field when it comes to Medicaid reimbursement may be interested in a resolution that is making its way through the House of Representatives. As this issue went to press, Congress is considering a resolution to expand the definition of “physician”in the Medicaid program. House Resolution 2959 would amend Title XIX of the Social Security Act to include podiatrists as physicians in Medicaid, making it consistent with Medicare’s definition of physicians. Physician is now defined by Medicaid as MDs and DOs. The American Podiatric Medical Association (A... continue reading
    Using the Harvest double syringe applicator, you will see the APC+ form a gel via activation with a calcium chloride/thrombin mixture upon applying it to the wound.
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM, CWS
    16,043 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    There has been a plethora of advances, especially within the last several years, for the treatment of chronic wounds. One of the more notable advancements is the use of autologous platelet-derived growth factors. Not only have platelet-derived growth factors gained notoriety in specialties such as orthopedic, maxillofacial and plastic surgery, the technology is increasingly being recognized as an important modality for accelerating healing in chronic wounds.1-3 Human epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been shown to enhance wound healing in diabetic ulcers.4 Researchers ha... continue reading
    The Arizona AFO is popular among podiatrists for treating Charcot deformities and adult-acquired flatfoot.
    Clinical Editor: Nicholas Sol, DPM
    22,343 reads | 1 comments | 09/03/08
    When weighing the options for ankle foot orthoses (AFOs), you must consider many different factors in order to find the most appropriate device for the patient. Both hinged and non-hinged AFOs work well for patients with certain conditions but not so well for others. In addition, shoe modifications may be necessary in order to help ensure the success of the AFO. With these issues in mind, our expert panelists take a look at the ins and outs of prescribing hinged and non-hinged AFOs. Q: What are the three or four most frequent diagnoses for which you prescribe a non-hinged AFO? A: N... continue reading
    MRSA infections (as shown above) are becoming increasingly more prevalent. The author notes that rates of nosocomial MRSA approach 60 percent in many ICUs. (Photo courtesy of Lawrence Karlock, DPM)
    By Mark Kosinski, DPM
    67,324 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    The common thread shared by virtually all antibiotics relevant to podiatry is their activity against S. aureus. After all, S. aureus is by far the predominant infecting organism in lower extremity skin and skin structure infections. The rationale behind choosing an appropriate anti-staphylococcal drug is a daunting task given the ever-changing resistance pattern of this formidable organism. Today, virtually all strains of S. aureus found in lower extremity infections produce beta-lactamase. Beta-lactamase (also known as penicillinase) is an enzyme that cleaves t... continue reading