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  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
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  • September 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 9
    By Gerard V. Yu, DPM, Andrew Vincent, DPM, and Wissam Khoury, DPM
    17,905 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/03
    Over the years, a multitude of techniques have been described and employed for digital arthrodesis, ranging from arthroplasty and arthrodesis to flexor tendon transfer and lesser digital implants. Each procedure has a place in surgical correction of digital deformities. Digital arthrodesis, in particular, provides permanent and reliable correction of deformities and is considered by the senior author to be a favored technique, especially when it comes to managing digital deformities of a biomechanical etiology. Two fundamental techniques, the end-to-end arthrodesis and the peg-in-hole arthro ... continue reading
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM
    16,139 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/03
    Keck first described tarsal tunnel syndrome in the literature back in 1962 and it remains a controversial topic today.1 While tarsal tunnel syndrome is a prevalent and common condition, lower extremity peripheral nerve entrapments and other nerve pathology can be clinically difficult to appreciate and understand. Needless to say, making a decision to proceed with surgical intervention for this condition can also be difficult. Experienced practitioners with a high degree of neurological understanding and appreciation for peripheral nerve pathology are more likely to focus on these p ... continue reading
    By James Q. Del Rosso, DO, FAOCD
    5,633 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/03
    Cutaneous malignancies and benign neoplasms simulating malignancy commonly affect the distal lower extremity, including the foot. One may see a variety of malignancy categories such as epithelial tumors, adnexal neoplasms, melanoytic neoplasms, vascular neoplasms and soft tissue tumors. Histologic confirmation of diagnosis is essentially mandatory, warranting the need to send all tissue specimens, including biopsy, incisional and excisional specimens, for pathology examination. In some cases, the pathologist may incorporate immunohistochemical stains to differentiate specific tumor types. D ... continue reading