Editorial Staff

  • Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects:
    Jeff Hall
  • Senior Editor
    Brian McCurdy
  • Circulation and Subscriptions
    Bonnie Shannon
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    Alana Balboni
  • Editorial Correspondence

  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
  • HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Blvd
    Suite 100, Malvern PA 19355
  • Telephone: (800) 237-7285, ext. 214
    Fax: (610) 560-0501
  • Email: jhall@hmpcommunications.com
  • September 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 9
    By Mark Hofbauer, DPM, and Steven Kravitz, DPM
    33,834 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/03
    Yes, Mark Hofbauer, DPM, cites the limited indications of the procedure. He says the first MPJ fusion is a better option for hallux abductovalgus patients as it provides enhanced stability and biomechanical effects. For the past 10 to 15 years, there has been a great debate over whether the Keller bunionectomy has become an outdated procedure. Proponents on both sides have been able to make solid arguments. The Keller bunionectomy began to get a black eye years ago when surgeons stretched the indications for its use. This was due in part because it was an easy, quick procedure to perform. A ... continue reading
    By John McCord, DPM
    2,722 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/03
    I ran into a young family physician in the hospital last week. He is one of the sharpest new doctors in our community and refers to podiatrists often. He looked terrible and seemed almost in shock. He let me know his job had just been terminated at the clinic where he was employed. He had one day to discharge his patients from the hospital or turn them over to other physicians. He was being replaced by a physician’s assistant. The bad stuff that our profession dealt with in the 1990s because of health care reform is still happening to our MD friends. We often complained during the ‘70s an ... continue reading
    By Neal Frankel, DPM
    7,225 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/03
    Who would have thought that when we finally went into practice after years of podiatry school and residency, we would be more dependent on third party payers for our existence than our patients? In fact, recent studies have indicated that, on the average, we spend one-half to one full hour per patient on paperwork and insurance matters. For many podiatrists to whom I have spoken, the “hassle factor” of trying to get paid from insurance companies seems to be the primary reason many of them are not happy with private practice. Keep in mind this is a game of sorts. The insurers want to keep ... continue reading