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  • Jeff Hall, Executive Editor/VP-Special Projects, Podiatry Today
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  • September 2003 | Volume 16 - Issue 9
    This is the proper way to separate tissues, ensuring that neural structures are not damaged in accessing the tarsal tunnel.
    By Stephen L. Barrett, DPM
    15,848 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Keck first described tarsal tunnel syndrome in the literature back in 1962 and it remains a controversial topic today.1 While tarsal tunnel syndrome is a prevalent and common condition, lower extremity peripheral nerve entrapments and other nerve pathology can be clinically difficult to appreciate and understand. Needless to say, making a decision to proceed with surgical intervention for this condition can also be difficult. Experienced practitioners with a high degree of neurological understanding and appreciation for peripheral nerve pathology are more likely to focus on these p... continue reading
    Be aware that superficial basal cell carcinoma may present with a very similar clinical appearance to squamous cell carcinoma in situ as seen above.
    By James Q. Del Rosso, DO, FAOCD
    5,502 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    Cutaneous malignancies and benign neoplasms simulating malignancy commonly affect the distal lower extremity, including the foot. One may see a variety of malignancy categories such as epithelial tumors, adnexal neoplasms, melanoytic neoplasms, vascular neoplasms and soft tissue tumors. Histologic confirmation of diagnosis is essentially mandatory, warranting the need to send all tissue specimens, including biopsy, incisional and excisional specimens, for pathology examination. In some cases, the pathologist may incorporate immunohistochemical stains to differentiate specific tumor types. D... continue reading
    Here you can see a post-op view of the patient’s left foot and a pre-op view of her right foot.
    By Babak Baravarian, DPM
    6,906 reads | 0 comments | 09/03/08
    A very difficult patient for me to treat is a young patient who has rheumatoid arthritis with severe deformity of the foot and ankle. This is typically a patient whose age may range from the late 20s to late 50s and is active except for his or her foot pain. With this in mind, let’s consider the following case study. A 27-year-old female presented with a 12-year history of rheumatoid arthritis and extreme pain and deformity of the forefoot. While both feet are painful, she says the left foot is more severe than the right. The patient says the pain is in the region of the lateral fourth and ... continue reading